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Hill climbing training gym exercises - please help

Girlonbike999Girlonbike999 Posts: 4
edited August 2016 in Training, fitness and health
I'd welcome help on my gym routine for building strrength for hill climbing.
Ditchling Beacon ate me alive today and so I figure I need to add to it.

So here's what I'm doing:
squats with a 5kg weight sets of 30, 40 and 60 seconds (up to 5mins)
Reverse lunges with 3kg weight 15 x 3 reps per leg
Presses - 40KG 10 x 6 reps
Steps x 100 with 3 KG weights in each hand

I do this 3 times a week

Is there anything else in the gym that I should be doing?
I'm also getting out and riding as much as possible too

Help appreciated and thank you!!!
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Posts

  • I'd get on the exercise bike instead and do some hard aerobic efforts of several minutes each. Strength isn't the limiter for hill climbs. Your aerobic condition is.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    A decent spin class or two would help.
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,983
    Ditch the weights for cycling
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  • OnTheRopesOnTheRopes Posts: 460
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Ditch the weights for cycling
    +1 Just ride in the hills more. Or find one hill and do hill repeats. Work hard

    Also think about losing weight if you have some to spare
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,605
    your squats are pretty pointless in the way you are doing them.

    doing forty reps with 5kg is less work than cycling a 8kg bike up a hill for 10 mins ..... Squats can really help with your power, but you need to lift heavy to initiate any response .. think more body weight on your back for 5-10 reps at a time.

    So either, lift heavy, or don't bother and use the time on the bike instead
  • AK_jnrAK_jnr Posts: 717
    Guess I'm the only person that does weights to compliment cycling then. :|
    But then I do it for power so 3-6 reps of a super heavy (for me) weight.
    I train for peak power though so different to hill climbing.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,385
    Whatever you do in the gym is not going to benefit you more than the equivalent amount of cycling. If you want to climb better - less gym, more bike.
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,605
    AK_jnr wrote:
    Guess I'm the only person that does weights to compliment cycling then. :|

    Nope, I also do weights as a compliment, but like you I do them to increase power for sprinting and shortburst fast twitch stuff

    so we are talking Squats 5 x 5 at 1.2x body weight (100kg), deadlifts 3 x 5 @ 1.6 x body weight (140kg), Bench 5 x 5 at 1x body weight (80kg), Over head press 5 x 5 @ 0.5 times body weight (40kg) ... and I cant be arsed with rows so stick to Weighted chin-ups and dips 10kg until I cant move any more.

    And yes it doesn't help with spending hours in the saddle, but it works wonders for explosive movements off the lights or overtaking busses
  • supermurph09supermurph09 Posts: 2,471
    Personally think you would be better honing your skills on the bike going uphill than in the gym. You won't develop feel and technique on the squat rack.
  • smudgeriismudgerii Posts: 125
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Ditch the weights for cycling


    You base this statement on what knowledge?
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Track cyclists use weights for explosive power.

    OP wants to be a hill climber - not a sprinter.

    Cycling more will help. Weights won't.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,385
    Smudgerii wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Ditch the weights for cycling


    You base this statement on what knowledge?

    Probably on the knowledge of the several hundred other threads which have all discussed the same topic, is my guess. Do a search and see for yourself.
  • smudgeriismudgerii Posts: 125
    Imposter wrote:
    Smudgerii wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Ditch the weights for cycling


    You base this statement on what knowledge?

    Probably on the knowledge of the several hundred other threads which have all discussed the same topic, is my guess. Do a search and see for yourself.

    No problem with searching. But, where is the validation in all of these threads? I've seen lots of opinions from both sides but who is correct?
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,385
    My suggestion would be to read the threads and make your own mind up. The fact that people are answering in the way they are should give you a clue though...
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    There's only one way to find out.... FIiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhttttt !
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Actually Smudgerii - if you read this thread carefully - you'll see everyone saying the same thing.

    Weights aren't needed for the OP's hillclimbing.

    The people on the thread that do use weights aren't doing that to get better at hillclimbing.

    So there you go.
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,605
    I suppose I could use the benefit of heavy lifting and fast twitch growth to sprint up hills ...... hills cant be longer than 45 seconds though ... actually make that 30seconds ... or 20 if they are really steep
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Yeah Ditchling is a bit longer than that I seem to recall....
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I do have a friend who's build is that of a sprinter. He dies on the hills but always attacks the short hills at speed.

    Inevitably he'll get a gap on me and grind to a halt 2/3 of the way up the hill. It doesn't seem to be working out this tactic.
  • OnTheRopesOnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Smudgerii wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Ditch the weights for cycling


    You base this statement on what knowledge?

    Probably based on all the decent climbers and the miles they put in compared with time in the gym
  • I would go with the general consensus that weight training for hill climbs is not going to make much difference unless you are looking to put the hammer down for 20-30 seconds, which does not appear to be the case for the OP.

    As previously highlighted by others, having a good aerobic base is a useful starting point. From there I have always found working on my anaerobic capacity to be good for shorter/steep climbs (looking at the profile of DB I am guessing you are out of the saddle a fair bit and struggling for breath?).

    A few of the crude (i.e. not scientifically based!) sessions I use are:

    - 20- 30 second sprints up a hill (something with at least a 4% gradient). Go as hard as possible in the biggest gear you can manage. I try and do 8-10 in a 2 hour ride but start off with a lower number if this is building too much lactic in your legs.
    - 3 minute efforts at anaerobic capacity. I have a 1km long hill at 5% gradient I use. I basically ride this at the top end of AC (about 320-340 watts for me) back to back until I am knackered which is usually 6-7 times.
    -5-10 minute efforts at Threshold (more aerobic than anaerobic, I know). I use a 3.5km hill at 2-3% average gradient and ride it around FTP, usually a big gear effort at about 30kmh. Again, I repeat until I can't maintain the same pace/wattage.

    Might be some things in there you could use, but as most have said just get out there and ride more hills as often as you can, that's the best way to adapt to the demands of climbing.

    Good luck.
  • smudgeriismudgerii Posts: 125
    still only seeing opinions but no validation on the opinions being given...

    How is a person to learn if all they are given is opinions? The OP isn't exactly 'hitting' the weights, his workout is basically a cardio / core strength program with the exception of the presses, which at that weight are adding nothing.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,385
    Smudgerii wrote:
    still only seeing opinions but no validation on the opinions being given...

    I don't know where you have been looking, but these two links are generally useful:

    http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/fitness/ ... engthstern
    viewtopic.php?f=40011&t=12753875
    Smudgerii wrote:
    How is a person to learn if all they are given is opinions? The OP isn't exactly 'hitting' the weights, his workout is basically a cardio / core strength program with the exception of the presses, which at that weight are adding nothing.

    This is an advice forum - and it's only as good as the advice which is given. Which means it is only as good as the people giving the advice. There have been, over the years, several contributions from cycling coaches and sports scientists on this topic, but I don't recall any of them ever advocating weights to improve climbing.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Smudgerii wrote:
    still only seeing opinions but no validation on the opinions being given...

    How is a person to learn if all they are given is opinions? The OP isn't exactly 'hitting' the weights, his workout is basically a cardio / core strength program with the exception of the presses, which at that weight are adding nothing.

    Pay attention at the back - the OP is called 'girlonbike999' - I deduce from this she's a girl...

    I guess most of us aren't sports scientists or have studied this in any detail - but I bet a fair few of us are pretty decent at climbing.

    What goes first for you smudgerii when you're climbing flat out - your legs or your cardio system ? So what would you work on most ?
  • frisbeefrisbee Posts: 691
    I got very generally fit when I was going to a gym and using a personal trainer a few years ago. Core work, interval training, lots of circuits, some heavy weights but even then compound sets.

    The few times I cycled during that period I found my strength and recovery from sharp efforts was good but I couldn't keep a constant pace. Not much use for any sort of hill much bigger than a bridge over a motorway.
  • fat daddy wrote:
    Squats can really help with your power,
    Just a general comment when I see statements like this.

    One needs to qualify such statements by specifying over what duration it will help with your power. There may be benefit for neuromuscular power and to some extent anaerobic capacity which are very short duration energy supply capabilities (measured in seconds), but for dominantly aerobic efforts over longer durations, i.e. much more than about a minute or so, then what really matters most is aerobic condition - maximal aerobic power and sustainable aerobic power or threshold power.

    The influence of such training on maximal aerobic and sustainable aerobic power is weak at best, and counterproductive at worst (the body of evidence on this is fairly equivocal) but more importantly, it's not nearly as effective as doing some decent on the bike training.

    That's not to say one shouldn't do such training, there may well be good reasons for it, however gaining improvement in sustainable aerobic power isn't one of them.
  • AK_jnrAK_jnr Posts: 717
    Out of interest what gains do you think can be made from heavy lifting for peak power? Not worried about aerobic durations, just 5 seconds as an example.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    The things that helped me most with hill climbing were:

    Lots of hill climbing - not as easy round here as it is in the Pennines, but I still found it possible to plot some routes with lots of smaller climbs...

    Losing 18 pounds.

    That second one helped quite a lot. To think I was carrying the equivalent of 8 bags of sugar around with me all the time. How in God's name did I let that happen??
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,385
    keef66 wrote:
    That second one helped quite a lot. To think I was carrying the equivalent of 8 bags of sugar around with me all the time. How in God's name did I let that happen??

    It's also the rough equivalent of carrying another complete bike...
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,605
    or a 3 y/o child
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