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Saddle pain

scott5scott5 Posts: 83
Hi there, first ever question. I'm looking for a way to reduce saddle pain. As the original seat on my bike snapped in half after about 3000km or so I got a replacement. Although the new saddle was the same as the old saddle it never felt right and became quite uncomfortable. So I replaced it with a prologo saddle. Still the same sort of problem keeps happening. On my body, there is a point between the 2 seat bones and the pressure build up after about 20km it quite immense. It feels like im putting so much weight there. Could this be as simple as raising the saddle up a bit to put more weight on the feet? :
Thanks
Scott

Posts

  • fudgeyfudgey Posts: 859
    Is it level? It could be that as you have changed it you have raised the nose up etc.
    Have you tried adjusting it at all?
    My winter bike is exactly the same as my summer bike,,, but dirty...
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    You could try one of these saddles with the cut-out in the middle, like this one:
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/sell ... lsrc=aw.ds
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    If you go to a proper Specialized dealer (and maybe some other brands) they'll measure your sit bones and recommend a saddle width based upon that. Some shops also offer saddles to try before you buy. Saddles are very personal things so what works for one person may very well not work for the next.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    Ι was also getting pain (within 30mins of riding) until I lowered the saddle.

    Seems like I was using the wrong height by quite a few cm's.
    So I used Lemond's formula (inseam x 0.883cm) which based on my height/inseam recommends a 71.5cm top of saddle to bottom bracket. From there I experimented and ended up with 73cm. Also I use my handlebars on the top position which is less aero but more relaxed which could have also helped.
  • scott5 wrote:
    Hi there, first ever question. I'm looking for a way to reduce saddle pain. As the original seat on my bike snapped in half after about 3000km or so I got a replacement. Although the new saddle was the same as the old saddle it never felt right and became quite uncomfortable. So I replaced it with a prologo saddle. Still the same sort of problem keeps happening. On my body, there is a point between the 2 seat bones and the pressure build up after about 20km it quite immense. It feels like im putting so much weight there. Could this be as simple as raising the saddle up a bit to put more weight on the feet? :
    Thanks
    Scott

    To simply answer your question, will raising the saddle up a bit put more weight on the feet? No. Increasing saddle height will make it worse.

    New saddles even when exactly the same as the old, are not quite the same in terms of comfort and in my experience do need a week or so to 'break in. My first question to you is, are you mistaking saddle pain for saddle sores? Those small lesions that look a bit like a zit on your undercarriage. We all suffer these at some stage and this website advice is as good as any...

    http://cyclinguphill.com/saddle-sore/

    To add, throw away bibtights / shorts if saddle sores keep re-occuring. Chamois do wear out quite discretely, even expensive ones. Don't suffer like I did, because I was to mean / stupid to admit my two pair of shorts were worn out.

    Let's assume it is not saddle soreness, then the second question is, how did you get the new saddle went back on your bike in exactly the same place in terms of height and forward / aft position? Even +/-2.5mm difference will make a big change in body angles and comfort. If you did take measurements before removing your broken saddle, then maybe your new saddle is simply not suited to you.

    Ultimately, where this is all heading is, bike-fit. Whether you work out how to get bck to being comfortable yourself or get professional help is your choice. There's plenty of advice here on who to go for bike fits here on the BR forums. But here is a starter for £11.04 to help give you some knowledge as regards to what a good bike-fit is. It may even provide you with the solution.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bike-Fit-Optimise-performance-avoidance/dp/1408190303

    My best advice would be to go for a bike fit, rather than trying to do it yourself. Aside from knowledge, it is skill and experience that counts. It is a combination of all three elements that you pay for with a bike-fit. £150-£250+ for a 2hr - 4hr consultation is a lot of money, and maybe even more if your saddle, bar width, stem length and ultimately bike are wrong. But, blingy bits, big watts and the right nutrition are of no value if you are not comfortable riding your bike,

    Hope this helps.
    Live to ski
    Ski to live
  • KajjalKajjal Posts: 3,404
    If you go to a proper Specialized dealer (and maybe some other brands) they'll measure your sit bones and recommend a saddle width based upon that. Some shops also offer saddles to try before you buy. Saddles are very personal things so what works for one person may very well not work for the next.

    This is good advice, i had a saddle that was too narrow and it was very painful. Plenty of guides on the web how to measure sit bones.
  • scott5scott5 Posts: 83
    Hi all,

    Thanks for the replies and advice. I moved the seat forward about 1-1.5cm and after a 2 hour ride no pain.
    However new problem arose with losing feeling in my fingers and thumb. I bought a copy of Bike Fit: Optimise your bike and that has given a few insights. So I think as soon as I can afford it a bike fit is on the cards.

    Thanks for the help

    Scott
  • Alex99Alex99 Posts: 1,436
    scott5 wrote:
    Hi all,

    Thanks for the replies and advice. I moved the seat forward about 1-1.5cm and after a 2 hour ride no pain.
    However new problem arose with losing feeling in my fingers and thumb. I bought a copy of Bike Fit: Optimise your bike and that has given a few insights. So I think as soon as I can afford it a bike fit is on the cards.

    Thanks for the help

    Scott

    That makes sense. You're probably sitting a little further back on your saddle, so effectively a bit wider. But, also a little further forward possibly with more weight on your hands. It if was me, I'd consider saddle angle... maybe nose up just a fraction.
  • kingrollokingrollo Posts: 3,147
    Slightly different circumstances - but after cycling for around 25 years without a problem - Suddenly I couldn't even sit on saddle or any hard surface. I had damaged the insertion point of my hamstring and was off the bike for 3 years.

    What really helped me was

    A brooks leather saddle - which looks a bit strange on a carbon bike - but I couldn't get comfy on anything else

    Chamois cream

    From what you have said yours sounds more like a fitting issue. But just thought I d pass the above on in case it helps
  • relkrelk Posts: 21
    A saddle has to be bought according to your body. Go to a store that measures the distance between the bones in your glutes. Basically you sit on two bones, one under each glute. The saddle width has to mach that. If the saddle is narrower, you will be sitting on the soft tissue and that will be painful. Some specialized stores have the matts where you sit on for 10 seconds and when you stand up the pressure points are clearly visible and the distance can be measured to choose the right saddle.
  • kingrollokingrollo Posts: 3,147
    relk wrote:
    A saddle has to be bought according to your body. Go to a store that measures the distance between the bones in your glutes. Basically you sit on two bones, one under each glute. The saddle width has to mach that. If the saddle is narrower, you will be sitting on the soft tissue and that will be painful. Some specialized stores have the matts where you sit on for 10 seconds and when you stand up the pressure points are clearly visible and the distance can be measured to choose the right saddle.

    On problem with that (and I have had it done) - is that some of the guys in the shops ....and elsewhere - is matching the measurement to the saddle - although you may measure 143 - I've heard it said you need the next saddle up. IT didn't work for me - a much, much wider brooks saddle did !!!!
  • scott5scott5 Posts: 83
    Just a quick update, had a bike fit, dropped the seat down by 1cm back by 1.5cm. flipped the handle bar stem upside down. The following day day did an 85km ride with no pain..happy days. should have done it a long time ago
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    scott5 wrote:
    Just a quick update, had a bike fit, dropped the seat down by 1cm back by 1.5cm. flipped the handle bar stem upside down. The following day day did an 85km ride with no pain..happy days. should have done it a long time ago
    Glad it's sorted, but just wondering how much was the bike fit? Experimenting by dropping the seat post a bit, getting the fore and aft position right and flipping the stem are things I've been doing myself to try and get the best position, so I'm not convinced the expense of a bit fit would be worth it for me.
  • KajjalKajjal Posts: 3,404
    Most bike fits are a compromise of sorts. Once you take the time to experiment you soon get the hang of the effect the changes have. Always start with the saddle and once you get that right the rest is a lot easier. Just remember that moving one part can sometimes mean you need to readjust another and don't make too many changes at once or you can't tell what is happening.
  • scott5scott5 Posts: 83
    scott5 wrote:
    Just a quick update, had a bike fit, dropped the seat down by 1cm back by 1.5cm. flipped the handle bar stem upside down. The following day day did an 85km ride with no pain..happy days. should have done it a long time ago
    Glad it's sorted, but just wondering how much was the bike fit? Experimenting by dropping the seat post a bit, getting the fore and aft position right and flipping the stem are things I've been doing myself to try and get the best position, so I'm not convinced the expense of a bit fit would be worth it for me.
    It cost me €50 in "the edge" here on Cork, Ireland. Looked after by Jerry who was extremely good and explained everything and why the change should help. Best cycling money I've spent in a long time.
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