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Winter Cycling Shoes - Do they work ?

galatzogalatzo Posts: 1,295
edited December 2015 in Road buying advice
http://www.wheelies.co.uk/p86408/Mavic-Ksyrium-Pro-Thermo-Road-Cycling-Shoes-2016.aspx?sku=290610&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=AdwordsProductAds&utm_campaign=Adwords&gclid=CjwKEAiAmqayBRDLgsfGiMmkxT0SJADHFUhPVxF4bFI6zCMm8HLm8QzW0B6Uxa7crBQ9y42U4wtK6hoCFB_w_wcB

Do these kind of things work any better than overshoes ? (which most people seem unhappy with)
Water always finds a way in eventually (as per that Dr Who episode... ok just me then) but wondered if anyone uses these and how they get on with them.
I was thinking of something like the above but hopefully gore-tex but cheaper to encourage me to commute a bit more in the winter, it's only 30 mins each way and thought surely they would keep me dry for that long in all but worst days in which case I'd drive.
Its not having to faff with overshoes on top of all the other wet weather gear that's appealing or would you recommend overshoes too ?
I like the look of the Mavics above so if they would keep me dry for an hour and a half to 2 hours they I may stretch to them and use them at weekends.

Cheers
25th August 2013 12hrs 37mins 52.3 seconds 238km 5500mtrs FYRM Never again.
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  • As a regular user of winter boots, here's my assessment.

    I've used North Wave Celcius Arctic goretex boots with woolie boolie socks for three winters now.

    1. Biggest benefit over overshoes is convenience. Just far less hassle especially if you commute.

    2. Wear and tear when walking: the model I use are SPD so for snow/slush/mud or just commuting where you want to walk here and there, they're far better than shoes + overshoes as you can walk on them without damage. Had I not had them, I'd have damaged a few pairs of overshoes before now, or had the hassle of having to remove/fit them for any walking sections.

    3. Weight and stiffness: same weight as my S-Works carbon shoes + neoprene overshoes and so stiff as to be indistinguishable.

    4. Waterproofness: similar to shoes + neo overshoes, biblical rain eventually gets in the top but feet stay warm in either case. My commute is 35-40 minutes each way and they always keep my feet dry even in rain at that duration.

    5. For very cold (subzero) I do add thin overshoes to the boots which does make a difference.

    In summary, if you're a regular winter rider then they're well worth it for the reduced hassle and wear vs overshoes, while offering similar warmth/water resistance as the overshoe option. Hope that helps.
  • galatzogalatzo Posts: 1,295
    Boradersrodie - thanks for the great reply.
    I was expecting people to say water still gets in through the top and not to bother but your journey time sounds similar to mine so I think the convenience is well worth the price to me, that said I'll have a look for something a bit cheaper, the Mavics look great but they're just winter shoes aren't they at the end of the day.
    I was expecting to pay circa £30 for a good pair of overshoes so they're getting cheaper all the time !
    25th August 2013 12hrs 37mins 52.3 seconds 238km 5500mtrs FYRM Never again.
  • trek_dantrek_dan Posts: 1,366
    Its a no from me.

    From a waterproofing point of view the major design flaw is unless your willing to wear full baggy plastic waterproof over trousers (not ideal for road biking) the rain just runs down your leg and into the shoes anyway. Then as their waterproof they fill up and you end with a puddle in the bottom.
  • w00dsterw00dster Posts: 880
    I'll echo a lot of what Bordersroadie says, I have the older version of the Northwave Fahrenheit GTX boots.
    They're a very good winter boot for keeping warm. On a dry, very cold day no problems, feet will stay warm.
    On a wet day though the water comes in at the top. They are on sale at the moment and can be picked up for less than £70.
    For this winter when it gets wet and bitter cold I'll be trying different options, carrier bags over socks and also looking at trying to divert the water away from the top of the boot area, maybe using part of a rubber glove. The only time it was really noticable was in cold downpours when we stopped for the obligatory coffee.
    Also, if I was buying them again I would go for the MTB Boots. Like any road shoe they are slippery when walking on wet concrete or even worst still, wet tiled areas.
    I personally find them more convenient and warmer than the cheaper overshoes I have used in the past. But I'm still searching for that holy grail method of keeping my toes warm in the real wet cold conditions.

    On Saturday it was very wet, I did a short ride, about 1 hour 15, socks were damp but feet felt fine.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Do you have full guards and flaps ?

    30 mins riding should be fine for overshoes. I'd not even bother with £30 pairs - get some cheap Planet X ones. You destroy even the expensive ones if you have to walk.

    Its not often that its actually raining - but the roads are wet for a lot longer than it rains.
  • I wear Shimano RW80s (No longer available) with Merino walking socks from Brasher. Buy socks first then try boots with them. You need biblongs without loops at the bottom so you can put them over the top of the boot. Also using mudguards helps to reduce the water dripping down your legs.

    They are brilliant, keep you dry and warm and are breathable enough (with the socks) not to overheat in warmer weather. I could never go back to overshoes.

    The Sidi Avast appeal to me as a replacement, but after four years of regular use the RW80s are showing no sign of ever wearing out.
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,363
    Its a no from me.

    From a waterproofing point of view the major design flaw is unless your willing to wear full baggy plastic waterproof over trousers (not ideal for road biking) the rain just runs down your leg and into the shoes anyway. Then as their waterproof they fill up and you end with a puddle in the bottom.

    I disagree, but mainly because I use some thin neoprene "gaiters" that effectively seal the top of my Northwave Celsius boots (the neoprene in tight but not uncomfortably so). I bought them from Edinburgh Bicycle Collective in their Xmas sale a few years back and they've have been brilliant. They look just like dry suit cuffs, which I think you can buy separately from good chandlers?
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • I've got a 40 minute commute and bought a pair of Northwave Celcius GTX last year as I was fed up of shredding overshoes. I used to get through at least 2 pairs a winter- I'm sure its the short walk to the office from the bike park that does it. Tried cheap Planet X & Decathlon ones, expensive BBB ones, all got shredded. The only ones with any durability were Endura MT500 but at £25 a pop, thought it wouldn't take too long for winter boots to pay for themselves.
    And for commute, solved that problem nicely, plus they are very warm.
    However I use mudguards with a front flap yet still I find loads of water gets in the top when its raining heavily. And once water gets in, its stays there, they take a long time to dry out. I had a particularly wet club ride recently and I could tip water out of them at the cafe stop. I have piles of newspaper in my locker at work to help dry them out.
    Would still recommend for commuting because they are so much less hassle but looking at other solutions for longer rides e.g Velotoze.
  • I'm another No - I used to use MW80s on my 50k round trip Highlands commute. The problem with them, like big heavy winter gloves, is that once they are wet they're impossible to get dry before it's time to go home. Give me layers every time. Woolley Boolie socks, regular shoes and a non-neoprene waterproof overshoe. The trick with overshoes is not to remove them fully unless you need to dry your shoes - just take them down far enough to undo your shoe. Non-neoprene (like BBB Waterflex) last much better. And, to keep your feet warm, wear long socks.

    Same goes with gloves - layer gloves with lobsters (with liners for really cold days). They dry much better too.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • Garry HGarry H Posts: 6,639
    I have the Shimano rw80 and prior to that an older spd version. I have found the the only way to keep dry is to wear them with overshoes. Even then i've had wet feet in very bad rain, however, i've never had cold feet in them despite only using thinnish merino socks. My biggest gripe with them is that once wet, they take a lot longer to dry out than regular shoes. I commute to work 4 days a week,40 mile round journey.
  • bsharp77bsharp77 Posts: 533
    Just ordered a pair of Velotoze to see how they perform in the wet - they look skin tight which should hopefully prevent the water getting in.
    Commute 30 mins each way and sick of putting wet shoes on again in the evening and sometimes even the next morning.
  • The gaiter idea works a treat for heavy rain to prevent boot-filling. You can buy dry suit ankle cuffs but I use cut-off sections of a pair of black Marigolds which work just fine.

    Riding in the wet, whatever you wear on your feet, it goes without saying that full mudguards and a flap make a colossal difference to the amount of water that can potentially run into the top of the boot, not to mention minimising all the shite that gets in your drivetrain, on your water bottle etc etc
  • galatzogalatzo Posts: 1,295
    This has gone how I thought it would now, should have locked it after the first reply as really don't know what to do now !
    I think for the length of my commute and how extreme the weather will ever be that I'll ride in then its worth a try.
    Cheers
    25th August 2013 12hrs 37mins 52.3 seconds 238km 5500mtrs FYRM Never again.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 24,089
    I only ever used MTB boots off road but I have to echo the others, Water found it's way in with ease - usually from puddles rather than actual rain. This was on short - usually about 2 hr - MTB rides so I can't seem them being much better on longer (3-4hr) road rides. The only way I found to keep water out was to wear waterproof trousers but in most cases then I'd boil in the bag and I wouldnt want to wear them on road

    Sealskin socks and a cheap pair of shoes a size up so they fit inside are better. The socks dry a lot better and are cheaper (so you can buy 2 pairs) too
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Just ordered a pair of Velotoze to see how they perform in the wet - they look skin tight which should hopefully prevent the water getting in.
    Commute 30 mins each way and sick of putting wet shoes on again in the evening and sometimes even the next morning.

    Velotoze work well, but your feet will sweat in them and thus still be "wet". They will however be warm and wet.

    They are a bit of a pig to get on n off, and make sure you don't fling them somewhere while wet- they'll shrivel and dry up like a used nodder :D get some cheap talc and dust them in it after use. Makes getting them on n off a lot easier too.

    I've got Spesh Defrosters for MTB. Fantastic, but as per other brands, water can find its way in thru the top. I am considering experimenting with some cut off Marigolds to make a cuff to try prevent this.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I still maintain that guards and flaps are your first line of defence.
  • I still maintain that guards and flaps are your first line of defence.

    They definitely are.

    But after riding for a week in some new Crono Artica's, I'm a convert to the winter boot/shoe concept.

    One less item to put on, one less item to keep washing. And surprisingly my boots have stood up to the dirt well, only needing a light brush down when they've dried out.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 24,089
    ^ You have a point about not ruining your summer shoes there...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    I still maintain that guards and flaps are your first line of defence.

    They definitely are.

    But after riding for a week in some new Crono Artica's, I'm a convert to the winter boot/shoe concept.

    One less item to put on, one less item to keep washing. And surprisingly my boots have stood up to the dirt well, only needing a light brush down when they've dried out.

    oooh - I am liking the look of those Cronos, is there anywhere in the UK to try them on/buy them?
  • ^ You have a point about not ruining your summer shoes there...

    That's one of the main reasons I got them. Most cycling shoes are designed for Summer, with vents, mesh panels etc. All of which you don't need in the Winter!
  • hypsterhypster Posts: 1,210
    I've never understood why the vast majority of cycling shoes have vents all over them. Apart from the three days of Summer we usually get it's either cold or raining in this country. Even climbing up l'Alpe d'Huez in 40 degree heat I've never thought "Blimey, my feet are hot! I wish I had more vents in my shoes".

    The only choice you seem to have is the extremes of vented Summer shoes or waterproof booties with nothing in between.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 24,089
    I've never understood why the vast majority of cycling shoes have vents all over them. Apart from the three days of Summer we usually get it's either cold or raining in this country. Even climbing up l'Alpe d'Huez in 40 degree heat I've never thought "Blimey, my feet are hot! I wish I had more vents in my shoes".

    The only choice you seem to have is the extremes of vented Summer shoes or waterproof booties with nothing in between.

    Becasue people want to believe that they re buying the perfect shoe for that day when they attack the peloton on Alpe d'huez, forgetting that they actually commute through Ealing at 10kph...

    This applied to 99% of all road cycling equipment.
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • trek_dantrek_dan Posts: 1,366
    I get hot feet terrible during the summer and my road shoes are Fizik R3s which are basically just one giant vent.
  • andyrrandyrr Posts: 1,665
    I bought a pair of Diadora Chili winter boots about 3 or 4 years ago - thoroughly recommended.
    My commute was (no longer able to cycle commute) around 70 minutes each way, 18 miles and I'd do this in all weathers, rain, snow etc
    I added a pair of overshoes - overkill maybe but combined with a bike that had full 'guards plus extended mudflap and the boots with overshoes meant I never again suffered from cold feet nor from much more than slightly damp socks. Helped keep all of the crud off the shoes too.
    With just ordinary shoes + overshoes I'd frequently have soaking feet by the journey's end and I ended up storing a pair of spare socks at work for this situation.
    The soles of the Diadoras were stiff, I'd bought with plenty of space around my foot (went up 3 euro shoe sizes in the end) and they, IMO, were one of the best bike-related purchases I'd made.
    I got these when they were around £45 I think and to me were worth every penny.
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    I've never understood why the vast majority of cycling shoes have vents all over them. Apart from the three days of Summer we usually get it's either cold or raining in this country. Even climbing up l'Alpe d'Huez in 40 degree heat I've never thought "Blimey, my feet are hot! I wish I had more vents in my shoes".

    The only choice you seem to have is the extremes of vented Summer shoes or waterproof booties with nothing in between.

    Thats why I use Shimano XC50N in all but extreme wet/cold - my feet never get hot in them despite riding in extreme heat. Dont need vents and therefore dont want them as this way my feet stay drier if/when it rains or when I put my foot in a puddle, bog or mud.
  • hypsterhypster Posts: 1,210
    I've never understood why the vast majority of cycling shoes have vents all over them. Apart from the three days of Summer we usually get it's either cold or raining in this country. Even climbing up l'Alpe d'Huez in 40 degree heat I've never thought "Blimey, my feet are hot! I wish I had more vents in my shoes".

    The only choice you seem to have is the extremes of vented Summer shoes or waterproof booties with nothing in between.

    Thats why I use Shimano XC50N in all but extreme wet/cold - my feet never get hot in them despite riding in extreme heat. Dont need vents and therefore dont want them as this way my feet stay drier if/when it rains or when I put my foot in a puddle, bog or mud.

    I wasn't familiar with those shoes so looked them up on the internet. What are the two webbed areas at the front of the shoe if they are not vents? Don't they let water in?
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    I've never understood why the vast majority of cycling shoes have vents all over them. Apart from the three days of Summer we usually get it's either cold or raining in this country. Even climbing up l'Alpe d'Huez in 40 degree heat I've never thought "Blimey, my feet are hot! I wish I had more vents in my shoes".

    The only choice you seem to have is the extremes of vented Summer shoes or waterproof booties with nothing in between.

    Thats why I use Shimano XC50N in all but extreme wet/cold - my feet never get hot in them despite riding in extreme heat. Dont need vents and therefore dont want them as this way my feet stay drier if/when it rains or when I put my foot in a puddle, bog or mud.

    I wasn't familiar with those shoes so looked them up on the internet. What are the two webbed areas at the front of the shoe if they are not vents? Don't they let water in?

    Are you looking at the XC50 or the XC50N?

    "Off-road shoes with sealed uppers for race-level performance all year round. The XC50N adds all weather protection to the superb XC50 feature set, giving you the same comfortable and dependable riding experience in all conditions."

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/clothing/shoes/product/review-shimano-xc50n-45666/
    I have wide feet, so it fits me just right!
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I've always gone for 'stouter' cycling shoes than the lighweight ones. I can count on one hand the number of hot days I got to ride this year.

    Crappy dull cool chilly cold days - about a hundred times more.....
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    I should say that my winter boots (Shimano MW81) can NOT be worn if its at all warm - makes your ankles sweat like crazy under the neoprene and not very pleasant.
  • hypsterhypster Posts: 1,210

    Are you looking at the XC50 or the XC50N?

    "Off-road shoes with sealed uppers for race-level performance all year round. The XC50N adds all weather protection to the superb XC50 feature set, giving you the same comfortable and dependable riding experience in all conditions."

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/clothing/shoes/product/review-shimano-xc50n-45666/
    I have wide feet, so it fits me just right!

    I was looking at the XC50N but the two panels at the front looked like they might be mesh which is why I asked. Presumably they are not and are just filled in? If so, I might consider a pair of these.
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