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Spinning advice?

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  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    As for the second statement. Its basically riding a static bike not root canal :roll: How many long term health implications can you think of?

    A stroke is pretty long term, as is knee ligerment damage. But I was talking in general about fitness classes
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330


    I very much doubt that first statement. I know someone who became a spin class instructor and he had to complete courses ?

    Well ive completed a 4 hour course in being a weight training instructor. But go on, what qualifications has your spin instructed got ? you dont know do you ?
  • JodyPJodyP Posts: 193
    brianbee wrote:
    But go on, what qualifications has your spin instructed got ? you dont know do you ?

    Quite a childish response. :roll: I don't need to justify myself to you so believe what you want to believe.
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    brianbee wrote:
    But go on, what qualifications has your spin instructed got ? you dont know do you ?

    Quite a childish response. :roll: I don't need to justify myself to you so believe what you want to believe.

    Your putting your anecdote forward to try and disprove my statement on the industry not being regulated

    When it comes down to it, you cant produce any actual detail of the qualifications you claim are necessary to run a spin class. All you can do is say a friend told you, so it must be true ?. Now that is childish
  • JodyPJodyP Posts: 193
    My anecdote was a real situation with someone I worked with for a decade. He had to have qualifications to instruct the spin class. I am not saying it is the case for every single gym (as you didn't) in the country .
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    My anecdote was a real situation with someone I worked with for a decade. He had to have qualifications to instruct the spin class. I am not saying it is the case for every single gym (as you didn't) in the country .

    And what are these qualifications then ? or who are the awarding body or what level NVQ are they ?

    Any information at all really other than someone told you they had them
  • JodyPJodyP Posts: 193
    My anecdote was a real situation with someone I worked with for a decade. He had to have qualifications to instruct the spin class. I am not saying it is the case for every single gym (as you didn't) in the country .

    And what are these qualifications then ? or who are the awarding body or what level NVQ are they ?

    Any information at all really other than someone told you they had them

    Again, wether you believe me or not is up to you. I can't offer proof other than trying to track him down and asking him what courses he took before being allowed the job.
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    My anecdote was a real situation with someone I worked with for a decade. He had to have qualifications to instruct the spin class. I am not saying it is the case for every single gym (as you didn't) in the country .

    And what are these qualifications then ? or who are the awarding body or what level NVQ are they ?

    Any information at all really other than someone told you they had them

    Again, wether you believe me or not is up to you. .
    Im sure you believed it true ! but you seem to have changed your mind in later posts about if they are a requirement of being put in charge of a spin class.

    If they are not, its a moot point anyway about if they exist or what they teach, because there is nothing that requires a spin coach to have them
  • JodyPJodyP Posts: 193
    This is going no where and I haven't changed my mind. Fact is SOME gyms, including the one my colleague was going to teach at require specific qualifications in order to obtain employment. At no point did I say all gyms have requirements and only expressed doubt at your statement that anyone can waltz into a trainers job.

    1st search for jobs as a spin instructor.
    http://www.indeed.co.uk/cmp/LEAR-Fitness/jobs/Indoor-Cycle-ffdcedb9190dafec?q=Spinning+Instructor

    The desired instructor must:
    Have a full Level 2 certificate in indoor cycle/ Spinning or equivalent

    http://www.envisagetraining.co.uk/course/level-2-certificate-in-instructing-group-indoor-cycling
    If successful in all the assessment elements, students will be awarded a Central YMCA Qualifications Level 2 Award in Group Indoor Cycling. This qualification allows entry to the Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs) at Level 2 & carries 16 REPs CPD points.
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    As for the second statement. Its basically riding a static bike not root canal :roll: How many long term health implications can you think of?

    A stroke is pretty long term, as is knee ligerment damage. But I was talking in general about fitness classes

    Are you immune from this if you ride outside? I would dispute that it's as clear as "riding outside is better". If you did the same session on a real bike then maybe. But the benefits to one's cycling will be more marked from doing spin classes (or intervals on the turbo) than a short spin down to the shops or a lap of the local trail centre where you stop at the top of every climb to discuss how awesome you are.

    You seem to be talking about risk anyway. The risk of dying from an exercise induced stroke or knee ligament damage is significantly less than being killed whilst riding on the road. So actually you're a madman to risk riding outside. In fact you probably shouldn't leave your bed. More people die falling down stairs than do having strokes in spinning classes.
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    This is going no where and I haven't changed my mind. Fact is SOME gyms, including the one my colleague was going to teach at require specific qualifications in order to obtain employment. At no point did I say all gyms have requirements and only expressed doubt at your statement that anyone can waltz into a trainers job.

    1st search for jobs as a spin instructor.
    http://www.indeed.co.uk/cmp/LEAR-Fitness/jobs/Indoor-Cycle-ffdcedb9190dafec?q=Spinning+Instructor

    The desired instructor must:
    Have a full Level 2 certificate in indoor cycle/ Spinning or equivalent

    http://www.envisagetraining.co.uk/course/level-2-certificate-in-instructing-group-indoor-cycling
    If successful in all the assessment elements, students will be awarded a Central YMCA Qualifications Level 2 Award in Group Indoor Cycling. This qualification allows entry to the Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs) at Level 2 & carries 16 REPs CPD points.

    OK so that's a level two NVQ. A level two NVQ isnt sufficient to allow you to work unsupervised as a plumber or an electrician, but is apparently enough for you to be trusted with the well being of 20 or so people doing very strenuous exercise.
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,535
    njee touches on a relevant point - its all very well arguing that spinning with a poor instructor could be bad for you, but we all go training outside on our own with no instructor and no qualifications - how is that any better???

    If we can be trusted to train ourselves then we should be able to recognise what instruction the intstructor gives us should be followed and what shouldnt.
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    njee touches on a relevant point - its all very well arguing that spinning with a poor instructor could be bad for you, but we all go training outside on our own with no instructor and no qualifications - how is that any better???

    If we can be trusted to train ourselves then we should be able to recognise what instruction the intstructor gives us should be followed and what shouldnt.

    When you say ''we all go training outside'' I assume you are limiting it to fellow forum members/ MTBers you know ? rather than it being a general statement applicable to all those who attend spinning classes

    Clearly WE might be more clued in and not in too bad a shape, That is hardly true of the public in general who might pop down to a class as their only exercise, believing they are getting expert supervision from someone who has a good understanding of the requirements of fitness. rather than someone who has little knowledge but looks good in a pair of shorts
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    You . The risk of dying from an exercise induced stroke is significantly less than being killed whilst riding on the road. .

    That wasn't the point I was making, But seem as you state as a fact, what are the comparative number of deaths from road cycling compared with exercise induced stroke, you clearly have these too hand in order to make such a statement

    NB i accept the number of deaths from knee damage is very low
  • One will be single figures, the other not.
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    One will be single figures, the other not.
    ?? you think the number of people who die3 from strokes brought on by exertion is only in single figures

    Really ?

    There seems to be a lot of wild guessing going on
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    One will be single figures, the other not.
    ?? you think the number of people who die3 from strokes brought on by exertion is only in single figures

    Really ?

    There seems to be a lot of wild guessing going on

    Here You are. I have done half the job for you.

    Cycling kills circa 120 people a year, or two and a bit a week. strokes kill circa one person every 13 minuets, 4 an hour getting on for 40,000 deaths a year

    I am beginning to think the risk of a cycling road death is very small compared to the risk of death by stroke ?
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,535
    One will be single figures, the other not.
    ?? you think the number of people who die3 from strokes brought on by exertion is only in single figures

    Really ?

    There seems to be a lot of wild guessing going on

    Here You are. I have done half the job for you.

    Cycling kills circa 120 people a year, or two and a bit a week. strokes kill circa one person every 13 minuets, 4 an hour getting on for 40,000 deaths a year

    I am beginning to think the risk of a cycling road death is very small compared to the risk of death by stroke ?

    You are missing the statistic of how many of those stroke victims attended a spin class within 12 months of the stroke?
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,535
    njee touches on a relevant point - its all very well arguing that spinning with a poor instructor could be bad for you, but we all go training outside on our own with no instructor and no qualifications - how is that any better???

    If we can be trusted to train ourselves then we should be able to recognise what instruction the intstructor gives us should be followed and what shouldnt.

    When you say ''we all go training outside'' I assume you are limiting it to fellow forum members/ MTBers you know ? rather than it being a general statement applicable to all those who attend spinning classes

    Clearly WE might be more clued in and not in too bad a shape, That is hardly true of the public in general who might pop down to a class as their only exercise, believing they are getting expert supervision from someone who has a good understanding of the requirements of fitness. rather than someone who has little knowledge but looks good in a pair of shorts


    Yes WE as in the people here on this forum - likely all cyclists. I dont think someone who just pops down to a class as their only exercise would be on this forum, it certainly doesnt apply to the OP or anyone worth dicsussing here. The question is can spinning be useful for cyclists as an addition to cycling (or an alternative over the winter). Advising people here not to go spinning because it is fraught with danger and you might die is nonsensical.

    If we were on the gymclassradar.com forum having this discussion, your points might make more sense but they are ridiculous to aim at the people on bikeradar. (in my opinion)
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    Yes WE as in the people here on this forum - likely all cyclists. I dont think someone who just pops down to a class as their only exercise would be on this forum, it certainly doesnt apply to the OP or anyone worth discussing here.

    Not worth discussing ? there are many new cyclist seeking advice about getting fitter. You cant just dismiss the dangers spinning might cause them as '' not worth discussing''

    If you read the OP, he went to his FIRST spin class and found he was pushing well beyond his comfort zone. That is indeed the danger zone for anyone new at any exercise. AND that's what a good instructor should be controlling

    Im sure the OP will be chuffed to find his problem is not Worth discussing
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    edit
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    One will be single figures, the other not.
    ?? you think the number of people who die3 from strokes brought on by exertion is only in single figures

    Really ?

    There seems to be a lot of wild guessing going on

    Here You are. I have done half the job for you.

    Cycling kills circa 120 people a year, or two and a bit a week. strokes kill circa one person every 13 minuets, 4 an hour getting on for 40,000 deaths a year

    I am beginning to think the risk of a cycling road death is very small compared to the risk of death by stroke ?

    You are missing the statistic of how many of those stroke victims attended a spin class within 12 months of the stroke?
    IM not missing anything !, its the other guy who needs to support his claim that exercise( not spinning) only cause upto nine deaths from strokes a year.
  • JodyPJodyP Posts: 193
    "You cant just dismiss the dangers spinning might cause"

    Be honest, how dangerous do you think spinning is?
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    "You cant just dismiss the dangers spinning might cause"

    Be honest, how dangerous do you think spinning is?

    if your 35 plus, overweight and unfit, I would say trying to spin at a high rate for 45 mins or so, was extremely dangerous. If your 25 and super fit, then hardly at all. But then gym membership has a significant proportion of middle aged fat people who cant walk 2 miles with out stopping for a rest, trying to lose weight and they may well end up in a spinning class or similar high heart rate activity
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,535
    Yes WE as in the people here on this forum - likely all cyclists. I dont think someone who just pops down to a class as their only exercise would be on this forum, it certainly doesnt apply to the OP or anyone worth discussing here.

    Not worth discussing ? there are many new cyclist seeking advice about getting fitter. You cant just dismiss the dangers spinning might cause them as '' not worth discussing''

    If you read the OP, he went to his FIRST spin class and found he was pushing well beyond his comfort zone. That is indeed the danger zone for anyone new at any exercise. AND that's what a good instructor should be controlling

    Im sure the OP will be chuffed to find his problem is not Worth discussing

    But those same new cyclist you refer to are actually out on the road trying to get fitter too - quick get out there and tell them all to stop, get back in the car and only go cycling if properly supervised by a super-qualified instructor.

    Anyone who cycles in the real world AND does spin classes needs to be able to assess in their own mind what is sensible exercise and what isnt. If they cant do that then the same problems exist in either scenario.

    You are just talking rubbish and digging a deeper and deeper hole...
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    But those same new cyclist you refer to are actually out on the road trying to get fitter too - quick get out there and tell them all to stop, ..

    And if a new cyclist came on the forum and said, Im 42, 4 stone over weight and haven't excised for 10 years.

    would you recommend that he finds a very long road with no traffic lights and cycles up it as fast as he can for an hour OR to the point he go no more and collapses. Be cause that the equivalent of him going to a spin class

    I suspect you would tell him to go easy and slowly build up his effort/distance/time over a long period of weeks or months
  • JodyPJodyP Posts: 193
    "if your 35 plus, overweight and unfit, I would say trying to spin at a high rate for 45 mins or so, was extremely dangerous."

    Hahahahahaha. Care to quantify extremely dangerous?
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,535
    But those same new cyclist you refer to are actually out on the road trying to get fitter too - quick get out there and tell them all to stop, ..

    And if a new cyclist came on the forum and said, Im 42, 4 stone over weight and haven't excised for 10 years.

    would you recommend that he finds a very long road with no traffic lights and cycles up it as fast as he can for an hour OR to the point he go no more and collapses. Be cause that the equivalent of him going to a spin class

    I suspect you would tell him to go easy and slowly build up his effort/distance/time over a long period of weeks or months

    I suspect that even unqualified trainers would tell him to go easy and build up at his own pace (any of the 6 instructors I have seen at my run down council leisure centre spin sessions do this).

    But then, if they told him to push that hard in lesson 1 and he listened and pushed beyond the limits of his body then he is probably stupid enough to do it on the road for himself if he has no advice or if he asks a mate that says "yeah, do hill intervals till you drop".

    You are just being stupid here and making stuff up to troll and/or be difficult. As such, I will post no more on the matter - looks like other people have started to give up feeding the troll already as traffic on this post has died down...
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330
    "if your 35 plus, overweight and unfit, I would say trying to spin at a high rate for 45 mins or so, was extremely dangerous."

    Hahahahahaha. Care to quantify extremely dangerous?


    I think a stroke is pretty much up there on the spectrum of danger, Not as dangerous as being shot in the head, but far more so than a broken leg

    the only thing more likely to bring on a stoke in unfit middle aged than no exercise, is to suddenly start doing vigorous exercise
  • brianbeebrianbee Posts: 330

    I

    But then, if they told him to push that hard in lesson 1 and he listened and pushed beyond the limits of his body then he is probably stupid ..

    Its not at all easy to go flat out on the road for an hour, unless they have closed the road, But anyway, you seem to have shifted from spinning is SAFE. to only stupid people die
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