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Nottingham

PepPep Posts: 501
edited September 2015 in The cake stop
a Job hunter is asking me if I want to apply for a Job in Nottingham.

What Kind of place is Nottingham?
In term of family life, schools, outdoor opportunity cycling running hiking, quality life....?

Thanks,
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Posts

  • PepPep Posts: 501
    for the record, I am 41 married with a young child. We love outdoor. Restaurants bar cinema theatre shops no thanks it's not our thing.
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 3,872
    Nottingham is my home town and I have to declare I do like the place in general despite leaving 11 years ago.

    However, if you're ignoring everything about the City life then the outdoors access all depends on how accessible you expect terrain to be.

    Great for Kayaking, rowing, rolling countryside. Accessibility to Peak district (1Hr). Rutland etc, 45 mins.

    If you want great bike riding on your doorstep with big climbs then no. Coast is 2 hrs away and it's Skegness.

    Prefer Lancs myself but miss the waterpsorts accessibility of Notts and also main roads where you can ride more than 300 yds without traffic lights.
  • ChoggerChogger Posts: 62
    Depends where about's in Nottingham you are looking I like it. There's also plenty to do for outdoor stuff you have the national watersports centre, your only 30 mins to an hour away from the peak district, in the north of the county you've got Sherwood forest and Sherwood pines, where I live I'm a twenty minute journey from the city centre and five minute journey into countryside villages. As above Cycling wise not really a place for monster climbs etc. but easy enough to ride/drive into the peak district
    P.s may be bias as born and bred in Nottingham lol
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 6,327
    I'm from Derby so I know Nottm pretty well. First thing is the official boundaries do not include many areas you'd consider as being Nottm suburbs so it's a bigger city that you might imagine, as these suburbs tend to be the wealthier ones the city's educational attainment and deprivation is not as bad as official stats might suggest. There are plenty of areas you probably wouldn't want to live in but there are plenty of nice ones.

    Cycling wise there are loads of clubs and a new outdoor circuit in Nottm plus a velodrome 15 miles away in Derby. Leicestershire is good countryside for cycling, Derbyshire is great, Notts itself not so much. I doubt anyone would move there for access to the great outdoors, it's not the worst place for that it's just not on your doorstep as it would be in say Sheffield. It's a big city though so you'd find a nice area with access to some decent riding and like minded people.
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  • Philly8mtPhilly8mt Posts: 552
    I "officially" live in Chesterfield, Derbyshire ... In reality I'm practically moved in with my partner who lives on the edge of Hucknall, close to Linby and fifteen minutes by car to the City centre. The cycling from here is pretty decent, getting out towards Southwell and the Vale of Belvoir.

    I like the city centre, it's easily accessible via the tram system, has a good social scene, shops etc etc.
    The roads around the city centre tend to be a little over congested for my liking, but where isn't these days?

    I travel around a bit with work and visit a lot of the larger towns and cites around the midlands and north of England, Nottingham is one of the nicer ones in my opinion.

    You just need to do ya research re "nice areas" :D
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
  • PepPep Posts: 501
    Thanks
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,689
    It would be helpful to know where you live now, to draw a comparison...
  • priorypriory Posts: 743
    look at Alfreton ctc website. They ride all over peak district but half the time they are to the east in nottinghamshire/lincs. Today I went with the wife to Newark area because it is flatter and there are a lot of lightly trafficked lanes.
    I seem to recall a well publicised survey in the nineties picking it as the best place to live in uk. It has as much reason to claim that title as many other places I would say.
    house prices have aways been low in the area as a whole
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  • Live outside Nottingham and cycle in.
    East/North Notts are good for cycling and the Vale of Belvoir is excellent cycling terrain.
    As others have said if you want lumpier terrain, Peak district not too far.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Youngest son was at Nottingham Uni for 3 years and loved it so much he stayed for a 4th, funding it by doing 3 jobs. He made the most of the nightlife though.

    The city centre seemed decent to me, plenty of eating / drinking options, and the leafier suburbs are quite pleasant. Surrounding countryside looks like decent cycling too.

    Some of his 2nd and 3rd year student housing was pretty dubious though...My wife wouldn't get out of the car!
  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 18,857
    I like Nottingham, access to countryside, whilst a great night out.

    For the record..................... I used to stay with a mate in St Ann's - so I know the downsides too!
  • Philly8mtPhilly8mt Posts: 552
    I like Nottingham, access to countryside, whilst a great night out.

    For the record..................... I used to stay with a mate in St Ann's - so I know the downsides too!


    I spent a night in St Ann's once .... Never again!

    The rest of Nottingham is absolutely fine :)
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,195
    Lived in Nottingham almost all my life, with a brief hiatus spent in Derby and Bolton. I can't imagine I'll ever look to live anywhere else in the UK, unless my hand is forced. We'll always be nearby. Mrs Mouth had a rather serious career option in Birmingham, and after her spending a year there (I stayed here and spent a lot of time in Brum) neither of us could convince ourselves to part-exchange our lives from her for one there.

    I personally think it's a great place to live, as long as you get the right part. Spend a lot of time looking before you commit to an area, the last thing you need is to live in mini Poland. For the record I live about 3 miles out of the city centre and my 3-bed end terrace with views over the Vale of Belvoir and the rest of the eastern landscape cost me 85k four years ago.

    There are several very good schools, especially if you're prepared to pay to live in certain catchment areas. Nottingham City schools (as opposed to Nottinghamshire County) are getting money chucked at them left, right, front and centre but expect a lot of EAL kids (English additional language) What age are yours?

    Secondary schools: West Bridgford and George Spencer effectively offer private school progress with the state footing the bill. East Leake Academy is reportedly quite good, as are the three church schools - Becket, Emmanuel and Blue Coat. If I were moving here, this is where I'd start. Slightly further afield is the Minster School in Southwell, where friends have kids and they rave highly. The friend in question is a secondary teacher (not at that school) - convenient to the tune of about 6 miles for Burton Joyce.

    Can't speak for the cycling because I don't get out on dedicated rides enough, but easy access to the peaks, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire all beckon. National Water Sports Centre is great, Wollaton Park is massive, Clumber park and Sherwood Forest just up the road, Goose Fair,

    If you're looking for a bite to eat, the city centre has several suitable establishments, as does the suburb of West Bridgford.

    Given a good budget, I reckon I'd be looking to buy in either Radcliffe on Trent or Burton Joyce. They're both very good compromises on living close enough but far enough away from the city centre. With less money in the pot, Colwick, Carlton and some of Arnold speaks to me. I also have several friends in the Eastwood area but for some reason I can't put my finger on I don't feel entirely comfortable there. Looked at several properties in that area before buying in Gedling. I'm generally biased towards the North-East of the city but have relatives in Chilwell and Beeston, who are all comfortable in their surroundings too.

    Avoid Clifton, Aspley, Broxtowe, Bulwell, Rise Park, Top Valley, Basford, St. Anns, Radford, Lenton, Hyson Green, Sneinton (Bakersfield is OK).

    I'm reasonably well travelled in Nottingham, having lived in many areas, and with relatives in the others.
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • Frank the tankFrank the tank Posts: 6,806
    edited August 2015
    I "officially" live in Chesterfield, Derbyshire ... In reality I'm practically moved in with my partner who lives on the edge of Hucknall, close to Linby and fifteen minutes by car to the City centre. The cycling from here is pretty decent, getting out towards Southwell and the Vale of Belvoir.

    I like the city centre, it's easily accessible via the tram system, has a good social scene, shops etc etc.
    The roads around the city centre tend to be a little over congested for my liking, but where isn't these days?

    I travel around a bit with work and visit a lot of the larger towns and cites around the midlands and north of England, Nottingham is one of the nicer ones in my opinion.

    You just need to do ya research re "nice areas" :D
    I live five minutes from you then Philly8mt.

    Obviously the best thing about Nottingham is it's only seven miles from the republic of Tankistan :lol:
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,689
    Spend a lot of time looking before you commit to an area, the last thing you need is to live in mini Poland.

    .. and here's the St. George's prize for the xenophobic comment of the month...

    Speechless... :roll:

    I suggest you take a trip to Krakow or Warsaw or Gdansk any other city in Poland... you might realise they are much nicer, cleaner and civilized places than the majority of British towns and cities...
    Seriously, get a grip!
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,195
    Spend a lot of time looking before you commit to an area, the last thing you need is to live in mini Poland.

    .. and here's the St. George's prize for the xenophobic comment of the month...

    Speechless... :roll:

    I suggest you take a trip to Krakow or Warsaw or Gdansk any other city in Poland... you might realise they are much nicer, cleaner and civilized places than the majority of British towns and cities...
    Seriously, get a grip!

    I understand that these places might all be nicer and cleaner than the average British city, but if they were so good, surely the locals would have stayed just that?

    What I refer to in picking your area is that I have friends who have been driven from their own communities by new people who have moved into them. One example is a fella at work whose kid couldn't make friends with any of the other kids in their street because none of them were prepared to speak English outside of the school gates. Oh and when you go to the corner shop and the attendant doesn't actually understand English? With Point of Sale materials in other languages? One doesn't even bother to stock English language (but plenty of others) newspapers or magazines any more. As for the looks I was getting when I went to the local Asian food market the other week, I felt like the visitor. IN MY HOME TOWN. Enough to make me not want to bother supporting some local businesses where possible any more.

    I'm not xenophobic, and indeed have no fear of foreigners. I sincerely hope you weren't implying that I have.
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,689
    By 21st century standards, no doubt you are a xenophobe, your words are those of the typical local UKIP charlatan,

    However, by 1960s standards, you are OK, if that's of any consolation... but the world has changed...

    PS: try the food at your local Asian food, it's better than Fray Bentos and mushy peas, honestly
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 3,872
    Spend a lot of time looking before you commit to an area, the last thing you need is to live in mini Poland.

    .. and here's the St. George's prize for the xenophobic comment of the month...

    Speechless... :roll:

    I suggest you take a trip to Krakow or Warsaw or Gdansk any other city in Poland... you might realise they are much nicer, cleaner and civilized places than the majority of British towns and cities...
    Seriously, get a grip!

    I understand that these places might all be nicer and cleaner than the average British city, but if they were so good, surely the locals would have stayed just that?

    What I refer to in picking your area is that I have friends who have been driven from their own communities by new people who have moved into them. One example is a fella at work whose kid couldn't make friends with any of the other kids in their street because none of them were prepared to speak English outside of the school gates. Oh and when you go to the corner shop and the attendant doesn't actually understand English? With Point of Sale materials in other languages? One doesn't even bother to stock English language (but plenty of others) newspapers or magazines any more. As for the looks I was getting when I went to the local Asian food market the other week, I felt like the visitor. IN MY HOME TOWN. Enough to make me not want to bother supporting some local businesses where possible any more.

    I'm not xenophobic, and indeed have no fear of foreigners. I sincerely hope you weren't implying that I have.[/quote]
    With the exception of your digression into ukip land, you gave a really good summary of Nottingham for a newcomer.
    As for your ukip bit. Kids make friends with kids regardless of language so that's nonsense. I grew up in Bridgford but when leaving the parental home, I spent a good few years in Sneinton. Whilst living in a heavily Asian area may not appeal to many, we never experienced any problems with race and my son made plenty of friends. It wasn't an area I'd choose to live in but the only significant problem we ever experienced was when we got white trash neighbours who just nicked anything not bolted down.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,689
    With the exception of your digression into ukip land, you gave a really good summary of Nottingham for a newcomer.
    As for your ukip bit. Kids make friends with kids regardless of language so that's nonsense. I grew up in Bridgford but when leaving the parental home, I spent a good few years in Sneinton. Whilst living in a heavily Asian area may not appeal to many, we never experienced any problems with race and my son made plenty of friends. It wasn't an area I'd choose to live in but the only significant problem we ever experienced was when we got white trash neighbours who just nicked anything not bolted down.

    Thank God a bit of fresh air...

    I think this appropriately named "mouth" guy fails to understand that the world is no longer the same place where birthplace gives you right and privileges...

    Retired Brits live in the South coast of France and Spain weighing heavily on the local healthcare system, whilst brining very little if anything to the local economy, other than properties speculations and immigrants from the EU come over here in search of better jobs and occasionally even take advantage of the benefits system if they apply... it's all well and good.

    What is not good is when social-nationalists like "mouth" ignore the fact that there are literally millions of immigrants who have paid taxes for many years in this country and yet they are not allowed to have a say in which privileged Eton educated muppet is going to run the country. That is a privilege that still comes with birth, or one that you can buy, but not everybody can afford to.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 14,745
    With the exception of your digression into ukip land, you gave a really good summary of Nottingham for a newcomer.
    As for your ukip bit. Kids make friends with kids regardless of language so that's nonsense. I grew up in Bridgford but when leaving the parental home, I spent a good few years in Sneinton. Whilst living in a heavily Asian area may not appeal to many, we never experienced any problems with race and my son made plenty of friends. It wasn't an area I'd choose to live in but the only significant problem we ever experienced was when we got white trash neighbours who just nicked anything not bolted down.

    Thank God a bit of fresh air...

    I think this appropriately named "mouth" guy fails to understand that the world is no longer the same place where birthplace gives you right and privileges...

    Retired Brits live in the South coast of France and Spain weighing heavily on the local healthcare system, whilst brining very little if anything to the local economy, other than properties speculations and immigrants from the EU come over here in search of better jobs and occasionally even take advantage of the benefits system if they apply... it's all well and good.

    What is not good is when social-nationalists like "mouth" ignore the fact that there are literally millions of immigrants who have paid taxes for many years in this country and yet they are not allowed to have a say in which privileged Eton educated muppet is going to run the country. That is a privilege that still comes with birth, or one that you can buy, but not everybody can afford to.

    Bit of an overlap with the Corbyn thread Ugo. If I were to go work abroad, I would not expect to be entitled to vote if I weren't a citizen of that country. Same applies here.
    As regards the 'Little Poland' and the the expats in France/Spain, I'm sure the expat communities with their English shops and pubs are not attractive to the French/Spanish as areas of some cities in the UK are seen as undesirable by the Brits in the same way, as Mouth quite clumsily stated.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 14,129
    I will never understand the premise of an English pub abroad.
    If you like England so much, why leave?
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Kieran_BurnsKieran_Burns Posts: 10,052
    Dragging this back... :)

    One thing I like about Nottingham for cycling is the large number of cycling routes in and around the City (plus the obvious support for cycling that goes on).

    If you have inexperienced cyclist friends / family and so on there are lots of the off-road routes (the big track) that are available and pottering around Attenborough is sublime in the Summer - I commute this way when the mood takes. Cycling to the Peaks is also perfectly viable as there quiet routes from Nottingham out past Derby, and as said: go the other way to enjoy the Vale of Belvoir, although the ride up the ridge the Castle sits on is a right pain in the bum :)

    You can live around Nottingham and commute in by bike, there are lots of available options and by and large the drivers are pretty good around here.
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
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  • andcpandcp Posts: 645
    If you're into closed circuit road racing a new circuit has been developed at Harvey Haddon stadium:
    "A 1.5km closed road cycling circuit is part of the redeveloped Harvey Hadden Sports Village, funded through Sport England’s Iconic Facilities fund plus a financial contribution from British Cycling. The track will be open to all levels of cyclists from beginners to elite riders.
    British Cycling carried out their final inspection for the Cycle Circuit last week and even took the opportunity to be the first to go round and test the facility. The inspection was well received and British Cycling were very positive about the track and the impact it can have on cycling in the city."


    Newsletter: http://www.nottinghamcity.gov.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=56009&p=0
    Map: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Nottingham,+Nottinghamshire+NG8+4PB/@52.9657387,-1.2188512,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x4879ea1129002b87:0x59f7ef60cbf0ca15
    "It must be true, it's on the internet" - Winston Churchill
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,195
    By 21st century standards, no doubt you are a xenophobe, your words are those of the typical local UKIP charlatan,

    However, by 1960s standards, you are OK, if that's of any consolation... but the world has changed...

    PS: try the food at your local Asian food, it's better than Fray Bentos and mushy peas, honestly


    Fray bentos? Didn't even know they were still going, and I never liked mushy peas anyway. The local curry houses (2 or 3 I prefer to use) generally see far more of my disposable income than the large multi-national pizza chains we have here.

    Anyway, I'm off to prepare the barricades for when my sister (who is now an Australian citizen, paid for her own further education there too before she naturalised and is now a foreigner in my house) visits later this month. Since I have a fear of her I won't bother seeing her. :lol:
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • [
    As for your ukip bit. Kids make friends with kids regardless of language so that's nonsense. I grew up in Bridgford but when leaving the parental home, I spent a good few years in Sneinton. Whilst living in a heavily Asian area may not appeal to many, we never experienced any problems with race and my son made plenty of friends. It wasn't an area I'd choose to live in but the only significant problem we ever experienced was when we got white trash neighbours who just nicked anything not bolted down.

    "White trash"? I think there's a thread in there discusing the use of that kind of generalisation in the context of pulling someone up for xenophobia.
    AFC Mercia women - sign for us
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 3,872
    [
    As for your ukip bit. Kids make friends with kids regardless of language so that's nonsense. I grew up in Bridgford but when leaving the parental home, I spent a good few years in Sneinton. Whilst living in a heavily Asian area may not appeal to many, we never experienced any problems with race and my son made plenty of friends. It wasn't an area I'd choose to live in but the only significant problem we ever experienced was when we got white trash neighbours who just nicked anything not bolted down.

    "White trash"? I think there's a thread in there discusing the use of that kind of generalisation in the context of pulling someone up for xenophobia.

    I'm not generalising. The specific neighbours that moved in next to us were specifically white trash. The mother was a prostitute and the two early twentys sons were both on the dole and habitual thieves. There were lots of other white families/residents around us. Some we liked, some we didn't, but none of the others would fit a generalisation of white trash. Our next door neighbours for the last few months of living in Sneinton were white trash and I stand by that. Very different from generalising about a group.

    The laughable fact was that we moved into a deprived area where we didn't feel threatened for a number of years. During the late 90's, buy to let became the norm route for housing purchases and the area declined heavily during that time. However, with house prices rising the area was then referred to as an up and coming area and even featured as such on a tv property programme. Talk about the sheen not matching the reality. But that's a whole different thread.
  • "White trash" implies a sub-section of white society, it is generalising, whether it's a justified generalisation is another matter but it does play on a stereotype of race and class.
    AFC Mercia women - sign for us
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 3,872
    "White trash" implies a sub-section of white society, it is generalising, whether it's a justified generalisation is another matter but it does play on a stereotype of race and class.

    OK, we run the risk of arguing semantics here.

    Muslim Jihadi terrorists exhibit a certain type of behaviour. Labeling an Asian person as a Jihadi, terrorist etc. just because they are muslim or Asian is racist and xenophobic. Describing a Jihadi terrorist as a Jihadi terrorist is valid due to their behaviour fulfilling the criteria.

    White trash behaviour is a certain type of behaviour for which I don't have the dictionary definition but I think plenty on here will get what I refer to. Calling people white trash simply due to their skin colour and social circumstances would validate your argument. I didn't though. I called out some people who were white and lived out trash lifestyles as white trash. Their actions earned them the distinction in my eyes.

    Yes, it's a derogatory term. I'm happy to label people through their actions and deeds. Not by accident of birth/circumstances.
  • I "officially" live in Chesterfield, Derbyshire ... In reality I'm practically moved in with my partner who lives on the edge of Hucknall, close to Linby and fifteen minutes by car to the City centre. The cycling from here is pretty decent, getting out towards Southwell and the Vale of Belvoir.

    I like the city centre, it's easily accessible via the tram system, has a good social scene, shops etc etc.
    The roads around the city centre tend to be a little over congested for my liking, but where isn't these days?

    I travel around a bit with work and visit a lot of the larger towns and cites around the midlands and north of England, Nottingham is one of the nicer ones in my opinion.

    You just need to do ya research re "nice areas" :D
    I live five minutes from you then Philly8mt.

    Obviously the best thing about Nottingham is it's only seven miles from the republic of Tankistan :lol:


    Yes, I noticed you were a Hucknall resident. We have the broken Collarbone in common also lol ... I'm now allowed back on the bike after 14/15 weeks! How's yours?
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
  • I "officially" live in Chesterfield, Derbyshire ... In reality I'm practically moved in with my partner who lives on the edge of Hucknall, close to Linby and fifteen minutes by car to the City centre. The cycling from here is pretty decent, getting out towards Southwell and the Vale of Belvoir.

    I like the city centre, it's easily accessible via the tram system, has a good social scene, shops etc etc.
    The roads around the city centre tend to be a little over congested for my liking, but where isn't these days?

    I travel around a bit with work and visit a lot of the larger towns and cites around the midlands and north of England, Nottingham is one of the nicer ones in my opinion.

    You just need to do ya research re "nice areas" :D
    I live five minutes from you then Philly8mt.

    Obviously the best thing about Nottingham is it's only seven miles from the republic of Tankistan :lol:


    Yes, I noticed you were a Hucknall resident. We have the broken Collarbone in common also lol ... I'm now allowed back on the bike after 14/15 weeks! How's yours?
    I've been turboing and had a couple of short rides out, but it's still sore. I'm no Tyler Hamilton. :lol:
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
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