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HR vs max during 10TT or similar?

bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
While doing a 10 mile TT or similar long hard threshold+ effort how does your HR look?

e.g. how does the average compare to LT HR above/same/below? How does it compare to max you have ever seen e.g during ramp test? Any difference between HR you see while riding "aero" on a TT setup vs otherwise?
Martin S. Newbury RC

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  • HRResponseAPITTI.png

    A 10-mile TT will have a HR trace that likely rises further than doing threshold training efforts such as the above but paced well it should have about the same shape. I'd expect that you'd get close to a state of VO2max in the closing stages and may also get somewhat closer to HRmax as a result.

    In a MAP test my HR would climb up to near HRmax, some days I'd hit it, other days not.

    Differences based on position are quite individual. I had no difference, some do. I ditched the strap nearly a decade ago. Provided no actionable intelligence given I had power data.

    Have a professional quality bike fitter do their stuff, with someone that knows their stuff. It was one the best cycling investments I ever made.
  • BeaconRuthBeaconRuth Posts: 2,086
    bahzob wrote:
    While doing a 10 mile TT or similar long hard threshold+ effort how does your HR look?

    e.g. how does the average compare to LT HR above/same/below? How does it compare to max you have ever seen e.g during ramp test? Any difference between HR you see while riding "aero" on a TT setup vs otherwise?
    Having just finished explaining to someone that I find the idea of 'LT HR' extremely unhelpful I feel I should reply.

    I can't emphasise enough that pacing intensive training efforts - or TTs - is better done by perceived effort and/or an accurate, reliable, objective measure such as speed on a turbo, or power, than by paying any attention at all to HR.

    HR is good and useful for some things but not for pacing at TT. It is so much more important to know the 'feel' of being on your limit than it is to look at your HRM and conclude anything at all from it. It could read anything at all and what it reads could give you a totally misleading impression.

    Ruth
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    Mine gets pretty close to max hr on a 10 (182bpm is the most I've ever seen on a MAP test or anything else).

    You can see the progression here: https://www.strava.com/activities/194801379/analysis
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • BeaconRuth wrote:
    bahzob wrote:
    While doing a 10 mile TT or similar long hard threshold+ effort how does your HR look?

    e.g. how does the average compare to LT HR above/same/below? How does it compare to max you have ever seen e.g during ramp test? Any difference between HR you see while riding "aero" on a TT setup vs otherwise?
    Having just finished explaining to someone that I find the idea of 'LT HR' extremely unhelpful I feel I should reply.

    I can't emphasise enough that pacing intensive training efforts - or TTs - is better done by perceived effort and/or an accurate, reliable, objective measure such as speed on a turbo, or power, than by paying any attention at all to HR.

    HR is good and useful for some things but not for pacing at TT. It is so much more important to know the 'feel' of being on your limit than it is to look at your HRM and conclude anything at all from it. It could read anything at all and what it reads could give you a totally misleading impression.

    Ruth
    That's pretty much the point of the chart I posted. HR response means its use for anything other than as a guide during quasi steady state sub-threshold riding is problematic.
  • bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
    Thanks for the replies.

    The reason for asking was that during weekly self assessed ramp tests I will regularly see a finishing HR in the range 172-174. If I had someone yelling in my ear I'd imagine it would be a bit higher (last "real" test was 16 months ago when it hit 180)

    In 10s HR never gets into the 170s. I thought this may be an issue but from what you say this could be expected.
    Martin S. Newbury RC
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    BeaconRuth wrote:
    HR is good and useful for some things but not for pacing at TT. It is so much more important to know the 'feel' of being on your limit than it is to look at your HRM and conclude anything at all from it.
    As a newbie to TTing I used HR to look at and see I've backed off ... then give myself a kick up the backside :D
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