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Turbo training - Speed or resistance?

funkygfunkyg Posts: 68
Treated myself to a turbo trainer at Christmas while the weather is pants, and the masochist in me is enjoying it.
I'm currently doing intervals on it for about 45 minutes. 10 minutes warm up and then intervals of between 45-90 seconds. (Using a CTXC video from youtube) For the hard bit I'm doing as fast as I can at a fair resistance and then reducing the resistance for the recovery bit.

Long term I'd like to increase my endurance/be able to ride for longer as well as increase my speeds.

Am I better doing higher cadence at a fair resistance or a lower cadence at a high resistance, or a bit of both?

Cheers.
GT Avalanche 3.0 Hydro
Ridley R6 EL

Posts

  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    Lots and lots of both
    ...................................................................................................

    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
  • Both as mentioned. Suggest you look at doing a training plan like Cyclo 90. That way you won't end up doing lots of junk miles.
  • Tom DeanTom Dean Posts: 1,723
    Both... Or neither. It's worth being comfortable over a range of cadence to allow for changes of gradient etc on the road. Aside from that, unless you have a specific reason, use a normal cadence and focus on intensity vs duration.
  • birdy247birdy247 Posts: 454
    Turbo trainers are fantastic tools for developing power over a range of durations. Keep in mind what you are training for. Are you targeting an event? If so, how long is it? Is it undulating, flat or hilly? As mentioned, the turbo is a great tool to add power, even more so if you use it in a way which emulates how you intend to ride on the road.
  • bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
    As above.Both, turbos are a great way of experimenting with different approaches and finding what works for you, much easier/safer than trying to do so on the road. If you go outside your comfort zone it's quite possible you may surprise yourself and find it actually produces better results.
    Martin S. Newbury RC
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