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One piece of advice...

dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
edited February 2015 in Road beginners
OK, I'm about to get my first ever road bike (whenever my Cyclescheme certificate ever comes through!) and I was wondering, having never ridden a road bike before, what would the one single piece of advice be from those of you that are a bit more experienced?
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Posts

  • lostboysaintlostboysaint Posts: 4,252
    Don't get killed.
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    Don't get killed.

    Thanks for that - I'll translate that in to "Take your time" :)
  • QubeQube Posts: 1,899
    Wear a helmet.

    Wave at other roadies.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Seriously?

    Pick the one that fits best and you like the look of, as that will make you enjoy it and want to ride it more.
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    coriordan wrote:
    Seriously?

    Pick the one that fits best and you like the look of, as that will make you enjoy it and want to ride it more.

    I'm not looking for advice on what bike to get, I know which bike I'm getting (you can't get a Cyclescheme certificate without choosing your bike first). I am simply asking what is the one piece of advice an experienced rider would give to a newcomer.
  • enjoy your cycling
  • Kieran_BurnsKieran_Burns Posts: 10,052
    It's all about the bike.

    http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/

    Nothing else need be said.
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • ben16vben16v Posts: 296
    be self sufficient - carry your own tubes, tools etc and know how to use them, no-one will mind helping if you have given it a go yourself
    i need more bikes
  • BLWBLW Posts: 96
    Buy a good seat bag to keep your puni kit n spare inner tube in and a good set of lights.

    Basically, kit yourself out right n enjoy the ride!
  • norvernrobnorvernrob Posts: 1,410
    Don't for one moment be lured into living your cycling life by a set of made up rules.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Never assume any driver has seen you, knows where you are going, how fast you are going, that they know where you are when turning left. Treat them all as idiots and expect at least one to do something stupid.
  • Pump your tires before every ride, and track your progress with Strava if you can.
  • ashtecashtec Posts: 13
    Never leave home without a basic brake down kit ie pump- inner tube - puncher repair kit- phone- drinks bottle- and £20 for just incase you never know when you need a rehydration stop even if the pub is the only place you can find lol

    Also my misses used to interrogate me to where I was going how long did I think it was going to take just in case I get run over lol I just brought a garmin edge 810 and use live track now she's happy knowing I'm safe and on the plus side I got a sh*t hot computer justified by safty
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    never stop worrying
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Get a decent track pump and nice tyres.
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    Before you go anywhere, take the wheels off the bike and put them back on again. Very easy to do, front wheel is trivial and rear just involves looping the chain onto the cassette. A couple of minutes and you'll know you know how to do it. Then take one of the wheels and remove the tyre, pull out the tube and then re-assemble. If you can do that then you know how to repair a puncture. Put a saddle bag on your bike, a small one will do, and stick in a spare tube, a multi-tool, a couple of tyre levers and a puncture repair kit. Fit a mini-pump to the bike - most come with a bracket to allow you mount it on a bottle mount along side the bottle cage. None of these are particularly expensive and all are essential.
    Also get a set of lights unless you never intend to be out except in full daylight.

    After that, you have the essentials, go ride and enjoy yourself.

    P.S.
    A track pump is pretty much essential too. It makes it trivial to get the right pressure in your tyres at home. The mini-pump will get you out of trouble on the road but it's hard work to get tyres up to decent pressure.
  • CHRISNOIRCHRISNOIR Posts: 1,400
    Make sure you have a good poo before you set off. Cycling always gets me, er, moving. I used to think that the blokes outside the cafe stop were waddling because of the cleated cycling shoes. Now I know better.
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    Thanks for all the advice, particularly the one from CHRISNOIR :D

    As the tyres that are coming on my bike (Btwin Alur 700) aren't that great I've already purchased some Michelin Pro4 Endurance tyres and I intent to fit these before I do a single metre on my bike so it will give me good practice for changing an inner tube.

    On a side note, I've just discovered I may not be getting my new bike for a few weeks yet. I checked my payslip and noticed my first Cyclescheme payment has gone out, so not being too happy at it going out before I actually have the bike I called them to be told that the application had only just begun today and it may be another 30 days before it gets completed! Potentially I could have had 2 payments gone out before I have the bike. Considering the application originally got approved on the 29th December I'm not too happy at all!
  • Lycra is your friend- that's one I took a while to learn at my cost.
  • Invest in a good pair of cycling shorts

    Its always a bit of a dilemma when you start with no cycling clothing. How much do I spend? What if I don't end up cycling as much as I thought I would? So, its natural to buy at the lower end first, and there is plenty of good quality affordable stuff around, you just have to research and decide what is important for you. The one thing that can make the biggest difference to your enjoyment (or otherwise) of time in the saddle is your cycling shorts. I use Pearl Izumi Attack shorts. Not the cheapest, certainly not the most expensive, and there will be better (and more expensive) out there - its just an example of spending a little more in an important (and sensitive) area.
  • lostboysaintlostboysaint Posts: 4,252
    dstev55 wrote:
    Don't get killed.

    Thanks for that - I'll translate that in to "Take your time" :)

    That's not a bad translation actually. What it really meant wasn't "take your time" but just "be aware". Don't ride around with blinkers on, take a good look at what's going on around you and sharpen the anticipation up. It'll make your ride both more enjoyable (actually taking in the environment you're cycling through) as well as safer.
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris
  • Schoie81Schoie81 Posts: 749
    Not a direct response to your thread, but re. the cyclescheme - I'd contact the cyclescheme directly and get some advice - it doesn't seem right to me that you've made your first payment out of your salary before you've got the certificate from them. I've bought three bikes now through the cyclescheme and on each occasion, the 'hire contract' started on the date the certificate was issued by them and then the first payment came out of my next payslip at the end of the month. The longest I've to had to wait between sending a quote to the cyclescheme and collecting the bike was 10days - I suspect the delays are coming from your employer/payroll department rather then the cyclescheme.
    "I look pretty young, but I'm just back-dated"
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    Schoie81 wrote:
    Not a direct response to your thread, but re. the cyclescheme - I'd contact the cyclescheme directly and get some advice - it doesn't seem right to me that you've made your first payment out of your salary before you've got the certificate from them. I've bought three bikes now through the cyclescheme and on each occasion, the 'hire contract' started on the date the certificate was issued by them and then the first payment came out of my next payslip at the end of the month. The longest I've to had to wait between sending a quote to the cyclescheme and collecting the bike was 10days - I suspect the delays are coming from your employer/payroll department rather then the cyclescheme.

    Well it seems it only takes a quick e-mail to the right people to start the ball rolling!

    I managed to find a contact who deals with the Cyclescheme at my company, and after e-mailing her this morning I have received my certificate this afternoon. Result!
  • stevie63stevie63 Posts: 481
    Never assume any driver has seen you, knows where you are going, how fast you are going, that they know where you are when turning left. Treat them all as idiots and expect at least one to do something stupid.
    Absolutely spot on, as the most vulnerable on the road this is the best way to make your rides safe.
  • Put your hands into the drops when going downhill! I didn't when I got my first road bike...result- broken shoulder.
  • Never assume any driver has seen you, knows where you are going, how fast you are going, that they know where you are when turning left. Treat them all as idiots and expect at least one to do something stupid.

    I think this is excellent advice. Self preservation before anything else on the list! Be predictable and consistent in your actions and learn how best to be assertive while not being overly aggressive.
    Cannondale caad7 ultegra
    S-works Tarmac sl5 etap
    Colnago c64 etap wifli
    Brother Swift
  • Don't forget to check out your reflection in shop windows
  • Never assume any driver has seen you, knows where you are going, how fast you are going, that they know where you are when turning left. Treat them all as idiots and expect at least one to do something stupid.

    Amen!
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    Again, thank you to everyone for the advice. I would like to think I am quite safety conscious anyway but I do worry about the amount of riding I will be doing on the road compared to what I have done so it will be very much on my mind.

    Got my bike and absolutely love it on first impressions. Just had a go with the clipless pedals in our living room and I am absolutely crapping myself for my first ride tomorrow! Getting out of them is easy, clipping in not so much!
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,111
    Assume you are invisible. This works several ways:

    1. You will ride more cautiously around traffic and learn to expect the unexpected;
    2. You will ride and wear whatever kit you want and won't care what others think;
    3. You won't take offence when other cyclists don't wave at you.

    Can't believe someone described a saddle bag as "essential" - I rode over 8,000 miles last year without, at no point did I miss having one.
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