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Shimano Dura Ace 9000 C24 Wheelset and Sora groupset

dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
edited January 2015 in Road beginners
Hi Everyone!

Newbie here, though i have been fairly new to cycling, Id like to ask to a Dura Ace 9000 C24 wheelset clincher would fit a Sora groupset which i have currently on my Scott CR1 30? ( I do have plans in investing to a better groupset later on as my skill and technique progress.


Thanks,

Marvin

Posts

  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Yes. Only caveat is the freehub being compatible with the sora 9 speed which i would be surprised if it isnt with the use of a spacer
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    If you are fairly new to cycling, what are you hoping to gain by sticking such an expensive wheelset on your bike? Common sense would say that, if your current wheels are ok, then ride your bike until springtime and then buy some wheels that help you in some way relevant then, although just some summer tyres can bring excellent improvements for a fraction of the price if your stock wheels are ok.

    The best gains at this time of year are usually achieved through steady training (with decent winter wear for when it is safe or turbo/rollers for when it isn't).
  • dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
    Thanks for the reply guys, though yes im fairly new to cycling , i plan to purchase the dura ace wheelset to get the bike ready in the future for an 11 speed groupset, Im running on a Syncros 27 Aero profile, working great dont get me wrong, but its only limited to a 10 speed .
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    I am all for the concept of more gears but dropping a large amount of cash on some wheels just in readiness to drop another huge amount on cash on a groupset to achieve...going from 9 to 11 gears may just be spending a lot for not a lot. Some folks are happy to do that, as with most things in life.

    My humble advice would remain unaltered though, ride your bike, fret ye not. In the springtime, have a think about what you want to achieve and the best way to spend to achieve that.
  • dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
    Thanks guys! Ill just keep riding for now.
  • TjgoodhewTjgoodhew Posts: 628
    I might be missing something but usually any bike with Sora will be towards the budget end when it comes to frames.

    Buying a £600 set of wheels and then an 11 speed group means you are likely to be putting £1100 into a frame that is worth a fraction of that.

    Best bet - Rider the hell out of the bike as is and save the £1100, sell the bike you have and then put it all together and buy a new bike circa £1500.

    A much cheaper way to improve your current bike would be to spend £50 on new tyres and tubes. Stock tyres and tubes are usually awful so you will notice a difference
    Cannondale Caad8
    Canyon Aeroad 8.0

    http://www.strava.com/athletes/goodhewt
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Tjgoodhew wrote:
    I might be missing something but usually any bike with Sora will be towards the budget end when it comes to frames.

    Not necessarily. You can get a Specialized Tarmac with Sora. That is the same frame throughout the range except the S-Works or SL4 version. A few brands put sora on to make their top end frames available to the masses.
  • dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
    I Have a Scott CR1 30 carbon frame. got the Bike for a great deal too.
  • dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
    For the winter ill start training hard and smart , yeah and perhaps start with tires first before lashing out a big amount of cash . Im running on 23mm tires , ill wear them out then perhaps upgrade from there , any suggestions though? Vittoria, continental?
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    dmax26 wrote:
    For the winter ill start training hard and smart , yeah and perhaps start with tires first before lashing out a big amount of cash . Im running on 23mm tires , ill wear them out then perhaps upgrade from there , any suggestions though? Vittoria, continental?
    Depends what you want to use them for and what your priorities are.
    You can spend a lot on Continental 4 Seasons and get good durability while retaining reasonable weight and speed and good grip in cold conditions. The Michelin Pro4 Endurance is also a likely a very good contender for similar purposes. If speed is the priority and you don't have much issue with punctures then the Continental Grand Prix or Michelin Pro4 Serivce Course are the slightly lighter and faster options from the same two manufacturers. There are lots of other options. These are some of the most popular.
  • I got the same bike and am working on the same theory that the frame is good enough to make it worth upgrading the wheels and groupset rather than buying a new bike. Come Spring I reckon I could get Ultegra 6800 and a pair of Zondas for a total of £750
  • dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
    its just the noise of the zonda though , other than that its lightweight 1550g a set
  • dmax26dmax26 Posts: 35
    How much of a difference does riding on a carbon wheel differ from a aluminum one? Is there really a noticable difference?
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    dmax26 wrote:
    How much of a difference does riding on a carbon wheel differ from a aluminum one? Is there really a noticable difference?

    They look cool and make a fantastic noise. Plus you get the aerodynamic benefit from having a much thinner wallet.
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