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Which air for my tyres

fleshtuxedofleshtuxedo Posts: 1,840
edited January 2014 in The bottom bracket
Currently running Michelin Pro 4 Race Endurance tyres, but wondering which air to inflate them with? Should I pump them up now (low pressure, somewhat moist air), or wait until a settled mass of high pressure air with low humidity has come across northern UK next week?

I understand that pumping up my tyres will increase the pressure but recognise it matters what your raw ingredients are.

I ride in groups mostly and am better on flats than hills. Just standard butyl tubes.

Thanks
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Posts

  • northpolenorthpole Posts: 1,499
    I find that nitrous oxide can be good for a laugh...

    Peter
  • djhermerdjhermer Posts: 328
    Currently running Michelin Pro 4 Race Endurance tyres, but wondering which air to inflate them with? Should I pump them up now (low pressure, somewhat moist air), or wait until a settled mass of high pressure air with low humidity has come across northern UK next week?

    I understand that pumping up my tyres will increase the pressure but recognise it matters what your raw ingredients are.

    I ride in groups mostly and am better on flats than hills. Just standard butyl tubes.

    Thanks

    Hot air. Loads of it about.
  • Helium. Makes your wheels much lighter.
  • Really?

    First "racing socks" and now this?

    Team Sky would be proud of the "marginal gains" approach you take I'm sure :D
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    I believe that Zipp are selling cannisters of low molecular weight gas specifically for this purpose - $50 for two tyres - bargain ;-)
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,422
    Helium for less rolling resistance. :)
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    northpole wrote:
    I find that nitrous oxide can be good for a laugh...

    That one certainly made me smile :)
  • Rapha, sorry Crapha 'censored ' is the only stuff to use.

    This used to be on the secrets of the peloton site:

    Crapha 2007 City Boy Collection


    Gimpboy Insert.

    Sourced from no lower than 2500m, there are only 45 known breeding pairs of the little photographed Haute Savoie Chamois and after we've got our 2007 stocks there'll only be few left. Each insert is hand moulded to the exact dimensions of Eddy Merckx's scrotum and stitched with thread strong enough to withstand forces of up to 5000 newtons or something. With discrete, understated comfort, the inserts will be hung up to cure for 10 years so reserve yours early.

    £850.00


    censored Oxygen.

    Bottled at source from at the worlds greatest archeological sites, the air contained is around 1000 x purer than today's polluted atmosphere. Ready to be used to insert your favorite tyres, Crapha censored Oxygen provides a ride quality that lends itself to a feel not dissimilar to cycling during its belle epoque.

    £200 per 120psi.



    Creme de Knackers.

    For episodes of heightened soreness, Rapha creme de Knackers with its patented blend of 3000 herbs and minerals will gently sooth the derrieres of even the softest City Boy. The carbon fibre cap of the tube provide unparrelled security whilst the bladed spout gives precision application.

    100ml - £75.00


    Turtles Head Toilet Roll.

    Produced from 2,000 year old Egyptian papyrus, this bathroom accessory gives unsurpassed wiping power reminiscent of a time when all our stools were more solid. Guaranteed not to smear yet gentle enough not to cause any unnecessary bleeding.

    £200 per roll


    Recycled Jeresy Pad.

    A throwback to a simpler age, place this up your jersey for warmth and style on those long down to the shop mountain descents. All pages contain hand written material by award winning authors and is printed using the ink from the sought after North Atlantic squid.

    £50 per sheet
    "an original thinker… the intellectual heir of Galileo and Einstein… suspicious of orthodoxy - any orthodoxy… He relishes all forms of ontological argument": jane90.
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    Interestingly enough, when I worked for Penske it was policy to use nitrogen to inflate the tyres of all the highline cars. In fact there are quite a lot of places in the US that charge extra for the privilege.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • mfinmfin Posts: 6,726
    Grill wrote:
    Interestingly enough, when I worked for Penske it was policy to use nitrogen to inflate the tyres of all the highline cars. In fact there are quite a lot of places in the US that charge extra for the privilege.

    I wouldn't go that far.
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    If you ask around on the site, someone may be able to get you some knocked off high quality air.

    Looking around there seem to be plenty of oxygen thieves!
  • bigpiklebigpikle Posts: 1,690
    Just watch out for cheap re-branded Chinese air - it just isnt as good as the real thing. Some say its lighter but it just doesnt last as long....
    Your Past is Not Your Potential...
  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,164
    Bigpikle wrote:
    Just watch out for cheap re-branded Chinese air - it just isnt as good as the real thing. Some say its lighter but it just doesnt last as long....

    And don't even try breathing with it, take one breath and within only a couple of minutes you will find yourself gasping for another.
  • mfin wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    Interestingly enough, when I worked for Penske it was policy to use nitrogen to inflate the tyres of all the highline cars. In fact there are quite a lot of places in the US that charge extra for the privilege.

    I wouldn't go that far.

    indeed you don't have to......

    http://www.atseuromaster.co.uk/nitrogen-inflation.htm
  • random manrandom man Posts: 1,518
    I could get you some Scotch mist, only £100 :wink:
  • peatpeat Posts: 1,242
    Grill wrote:
    Interestingly enough, when I worked for Penske it was policy to use nitrogen to inflate the tyres of all the highline cars. In fact there are quite a lot of places in the US that charge extra for the privilege.

    Yep, Nitrogen is the most stable gas to inflate tyres with.

    Working for Penske, did you ever get to meet 'The Captain', Roger?
  • bucklesbuckles Posts: 694
    Use helium as it's lighter than standard air. The weight you'll save will make climbing and accelerating much easier.
    25% off your first MyProtein order: sign up via https://www.myprotein.com/referrals.lis ... EE-R29Y&li or use my referral code LEE-R29Y
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    Marginal gains is what it's about ...
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    Peat wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    Interestingly enough, when I worked for Penske it was policy to use nitrogen to inflate the tyres of all the highline cars. In fact there are quite a lot of places in the US that charge extra for the privilege.

    Yep, Nitrogen is the most stable gas to inflate tyres with.

    Working for Penske, did you ever get to meet 'The Captain', Roger?

    Indeed, several times. Really nice guy. Problem is that you can only work for Penske twice (I left and came back) and after that you're done. The man doesn't give third chances.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • FatTedFatTed Posts: 1,205
    I use Nitrogen in my car tyres, maintains correct pressure for much longer than air, and therefore prolongs the life of the tyre. I guess if you checked the pressure in your tyres every week then it would be the same.
  • arran77arran77 Posts: 9,260
    djhermer wrote:
    Currently running Michelin Pro 4 Race Endurance tyres, but wondering which air to inflate them with? Should I pump them up now (low pressure, somewhat moist air), or wait until a settled mass of high pressure air with low humidity has come across northern UK next week?

    I understand that pumping up my tyres will increase the pressure but recognise it matters what your raw ingredients are.

    I ride in groups mostly and am better on flats than hills. Just standard butyl tubes.

    Thanks

    Hot air. Loads of it about.

    PM VTech, he's full of it :wink:
    "Arran, you are like the Tony Benn of smut. You have never diluted your depravity and always stand by your beliefs. You have my respect sir and your wife my pity" :lol:

    seanoconn
  • SproolSprool Posts: 1,022
    FatTed wrote:
    I use Nitrogen in my car tyres, maintains correct pressure for much longer than air, and therefore prolongs the life of the tyre. I guess if you checked the pressure in your tyres every week then it would be the same.
    Are you sure about this? The report I read carried out by a university in Canada (sorry can't recall which one now) found no significant difference in the rate of diffusion through automobile tyres for nitrogen or compressed air which is about 78% nitrogen anyway. I looked into this last year as Quickfit were charging more for N2 saying it was more stable and safe, gave you better fuel consumption and they used it in F1 and aerospace so it must be better. I think its bad science personally. Good reasons for using it in F1 and aerospace, thats the lower flammability if punctured and the slightly lower coefficient of expansion at temperature extremes. None of which is really significant for the average motorist (or cyclist). Maths modelling showing lower diffusion rates of N2 in truck tyres were based on a flawed model of assuming far more leakage than normally occurs. The conclusion is that if you keep your tyre pressures correct then your rule consumption and your grip is optimised. It makes no difference if its 99.9% N2 in there or compressed air with 78% N2.
  • Wirral_paulWirral_paul Posts: 2,476
    Costco's tyre depots claim the same pressure retention.

    http://tires2.costco.com/CostcoAdvantage.aspx

    I think it is used in racing as it gives very tight control over the tyre pressures - crucial in sports like F1 and Indy Car etc where they are looking at fractions of a lb making a difference.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,903
    Wish I'd thought of a business model flogging nitrogen to punters, who could use air for free to do the same job.
  • joelsimjoelsim Posts: 7,552
    Ballysmate wrote:
    Wish I'd thought of a business model flogging nitrogen to punters, who could use air for free to do the same job.

    That be loike bottled water then
  • FatTedFatTed Posts: 1,205
    Sprool wrote:
    FatTed wrote:
    I use Nitrogen in my car tyres, maintains correct pressure for much longer than air, and therefore prolongs the life of the tyre. I guess if you checked the pressure in your tyres every week then it would be the same.
    Are you sure about this? The report I read carried out by a university in Canada (sorry can't recall which one now) found no significant difference in the rate of diffusion through automobile tyres for nitrogen or compressed air which is about 78% nitrogen anyway. I looked into this last year as Quickfit were charging more for N2 saying it was more stable and safe, gave you better fuel consumption and they used it in F1 and aerospace so it must be better. I think its bad science personally. Good reasons for using it in F1 and aerospace, thats the lower flammability if punctured and the slightly lower coefficient of expansion at temperature extremes. None of which is really significant for the average motorist (or cyclist). Maths modelling showing lower diffusion rates of N2 in truck tyres were based on a flawed model of assuming far more leakage than normally occurs. The conclusion is that if you keep your tyre pressures correct then your rule consumption and your grip is optimised. It makes no difference if its 99.9% N2 in there or compressed air with 78% N2.
    No I'm not sure, but the tyre pressures are stable over months, perhaps they would be with Air, It only cost the same as a couple of bottles of water
  • peatpeat Posts: 1,242
    The stability it provides is only based on temperature expansion. In race cars, tyre pressures are pretty critical so they want to be able to accurate predict how much cold pressure they need. Same with aerospace, when landing the tyres are subjected to sudden massive temperature gain.

    I don't think it will make a noticeable difference in cars or bikes tbh. In a high pressure bike tyre, you might see some benefit i guess. If you pump your tyres in say, an air conditioned office in the height of summer and then go out onto hot roads, you would probably see a rise in pressure.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    arran77 wrote:
    djhermer wrote:

    Hot air. Loads of it about.

    PM VTech, he's full of it :wink:

    Nope, it's not hot air he's full of :wink:
  • Waitrose has some organic Heston Blumenthal air in biodegrable canisters darling.
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