Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

Pedals cleats and shoes

craigus89craigus89 Posts: 884
edited December 2013 in Road beginners
Hi all

I'm going to be getting a Giant Defy 4 or 5 in the very near future, but have got a couple of questions as I'm new to the road.

I would like to get some proper pedals/shoes/cleats but I'm a little confused. The pedals on the Defy are "Wellgo with toe-clip" which I assume aren't much cop. I can't figure out what comes with what, do cleats come with the pedals or shoes? D you get cleat specific shoes?

If I bought these pedals: http://www.bicyclechain.co.uk/product/s ... -blk/04228 will most shoes be usable with them?

Despite being a bit bewildered I'm mega excited about getting out on the road.

Cheers

Posts

  • majormantramajormantra Posts: 2,094
    Cleats normally come with pedals. Occasionally (e.g. in the case of some cut price ebay shops) they are omitted, but they should say if they are.

    Any 3 bolt road shoe will be compatible with those. (Not a 2 bolt mtb shoe.)
  • craigus89 wrote:
    Hi all

    I'm going to be getting a Giant Defy 4 or 5 in the very near future, but have got a couple of questions as I'm new to the road.

    I would like to get some proper pedals/shoes/cleats but I'm a little confused. The pedals on the Defy are "Wellgo with toe-clip" which I assume aren't much cop. I can't figure out what comes with what, do cleats come with the pedals or shoes? D you get cleat specific shoes?

    If I bought these pedals: http://www.bicyclechain.co.uk/product/s ... -blk/04228 will most shoes be usable with them?

    Despite being a bit bewildered I'm mega excited about getting out on the road.

    Cheers
    Clipless pedals are great. You can get R540s much cheaper at Merlin: http://www.merlincycles.com/bike-shop/r ... dals.html; they also stock the next level up (R550s) at only £32.50.

    I'd recommend buying shoes from a shop where you can try them on first, or buying a few pairs online and returning all except the best fitting. When changing the pedals, remember the left-hand crank has a left-hand thread. Make sure the cleats are fitted tight but be prepared to make small adjustments until they're in the right position for you; it's very personal and may not even be the same for both feet. Practise clipping in and out while stationary, then on quiet roads. And don't be ashamed when you fall off because you can't unclip in time: everyone does it at least once. 8)

    Have fun.
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    Hi Craigus89, the pedals that you have shown are road pedals (SPD-SL) which may sound like what you need, but may not be the best bet for a beginner. I have two road bikes but still use MTB (mountain bike) SPD pedals, as they are double-sided and very easy to use with MTB SPD shoes, which you can also walk in much easier than pure road shoes. I hear that one-sided SPD-SLs can be difficult to clip into when setting-off at traffic lights, roundabouts etc. so I've never felt the need to move to SPD-SLs as at my level there would be negligible performance improvement.

    Accordingly it may be worth you considering SPD pedals and shoes to start with.
  • The pedals that come with your bike probably won't be all that amazing, but they should be basically adequate. Clips and straps (even cheap ones) are a great place to start - loosen them all the way, and get used to having to do something with your foot at junctions.

    But if you do want to upgrade, the SPD and SPD-SL systems are a good place to start. I prefer the former, personally - better cleat life, double-sided platforms, ease of walking...
  • elderoneelderone Posts: 1,410
    I have a defy4 and have spd sl peddles and shimano shoes. Never had a problem.
    Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori
  • elderone wrote:
    I have a defy4 and have spd sl peddles and shimano shoes. Never had a problem.

    There's nothing wrong with single-sided pedals - double-sided are just more practical, particularly in busy traffic - but how often do you have to replace your cleats?
  • Thanks for all the replies everyone.

    I picked up the bike today and also some shimano R078 shoes which were the comfiest I tried. They threw in the pedals I linked to for free with the purchase, so I'll try out those and if I struggle I can switch to SPD pedals I suppose.

    I'm fully expecting to stack it a few times though!

    Going out for a proper ride Sunday but can't wait so I'm also going out tomorrow for a short blast.
  • There really isn't anything wrong with SPD-SL pedals - it's just that there are a few advantages to the SPD system that they don't have. The most important thing is that you get the most comfortable pair of shoes; worry about pedals later.
  • mabbomabbo Posts: 117
    I went back to clipless when I got my Defy in 2010. I took advice from some freinds whom do Ironman comps. They reckoned the Shimano SPD's were easiest for getting in and out of as they can be adjusted. I bought a pair of the 540's and they have been great. An hours practice on a borrowed turbo trainer and I was sorted. If you dont want to spend a fortune on shoes, try Wiggle DHB's own to start. I went with them for my first pair and got three years out of them.
    Oh, and as others say...............you will fall off. Mostly at junctions.

    Enjoy the Giant.........................they are brilliant bikes.
  • +1 For shoes that are comfortable being most important.

    Different cleat systems have different pros & cons, but having shoes that fit just right make a bigger difference (IMHO). For me, that's my pair of Northwave Evo SBS that I happened across in my LBS on sale last summer. And, they're even better now for adding some insoles with extra arch support.

    Not saying the above set up is right for everyone, just that my switch from one cleat system to another (Look to Speedplay) made little difference to comfort compared to a change of shoes.
    Weekend: Orbea Orca SLi2, Shimano Dura Ace C50s & Conti GP4000s
    Week: Boardman CX Team, Shimano RX31s & Conti Gatorskin Hardshells
    Twitter: @pete8uk, Strava: 1277229
  • You can pick up some SPD shoes for < £50 (£20 if there is an Aldi sale but there isn't another due until May). Then some M520 pedals for £17 at Evans. That's probably one of the cheapest ways to get a clipless solution.

    As ever with most things cycling you can spend as much as you like.
  • I've got the Defy5 and have just changed the pedals to Shimano M324 with Shimano MT23 shoes and Shimano SM-SH56 cleats. I have never ridden with cleats before so I thought I'd play safe.
    Mike
  • I guess it depends on how you will be riding. If it involves riding through towns with lots of stops and starts then maybe SPD are a better choice. If its mainly country roads then probably the spd-sl set up will be better.

    I started cycling last year and just went straight for clip-less and spd-sl. I bought the cheapest shimano pedals and found a pair of shoes from sports direct for £20 After half hour of stationary practice and a couple of rides it felt totally natural. After a few months i went and bought a much better pair of Shimano shoes and sold the others on ebay for £10.

    My advice would be to just jump in at the deep end and you wont regret it whichever system you choose
    Cannondale Caad8
    Canyon Aeroad 8.0

    http://www.strava.com/athletes/goodhewt
  • How did you find the Shimano shoes (presumably still SPD?) as opposed to the Aldi ones? As I'm planning to ugprade my Aldi shoes soon.
  • As the very proud owner of The Bicycle Chain so I thought I had better follow the link and read the posts.

    For some back ground I started the business 21 years ago with the aim to provide my family with an income and long term employment if they were interested in cycling. Over 21 people currently have full time employment which I believe they really enjoy and I hope that I will be able to continue providing them with work for many years to come.

    Much has changed in those 21 years, not least that branded products like Shimano are available to retail customers buying single products, post free, at less than I can buy them for from official channels. In fact the official channel requires me to purchase £150 of goods before VAT to receive free carriage!

    We still offer free advice on what products will enhance your cycling and you are able to take that advice and purchase elsewhere. Like most independent bicycle dealers we are struggling to come up with effective solutions to the current trading conditions that were not of our making. Until we do come up with a worthwhile solution please visit your local IBD, ask his advice, ask for his best price and don't be heartless if you have to spend a little bit more.

    If you don't want to spend a bit more don't visit as talking to you may lose him a real sale.
  • I've been riding with MTB type spd M520's for years on my road bikes and I also have a pair of welgo m520 clones.

    I just upgraded to spd-sl r550 which I got for £31 and I think it's been well worth the change.

    My foot rolls a lot less so it feels like more power is getting into the drivetrain and I find them much easier to get into when setting off.

    I also find them far easier to walk in on my racing shoes as they have rubbery corners and are wider than the metal MTB cleats, although not as easy as my old shimano mt23 touring shoes.

    Whatever you choose to buy, the transition to clip less is a steep learning curve but you will wonder why you didn't do it years ago.
Sign In or Register to comment.