Do you cycle to work most days of the week? (survey)

camilg
camilg Posts: 5
edited December 2013 in Commuting chat
Hi fellow cyclists,

If you cycle to work most days of the week and whatever the weather then your opinion matters a lot to me!

I am a cyclist/ entrepreneur with an idea of an innovative sportswear that will improve the journey of commuter cyclists on rainy days. Apologies for not unveiling any features of the product in this thread, I would like first to take the time to research on the trends/ habits of commuters.

In order to do so, I have published a survey on Quicksurvey that you can find here: https://www.quicksurveys.com/s/e5Q3K

Thanks a lot for your help, any questions, suggestions are welcome.

Cami
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Comments

  • I did try to fill the survey in but it sucked and I gave up when I got stuck on the third page (yes or no answers but there was no question).
    First love - Genesis Equilibrium 20
    Dirty - Forme Calver CX Sport
    Quickie - Scott CR1 SL HMX
    Notable ex's - Kinesis Crosslight, Specialized Tricross
  • tgotb
    tgotb Posts: 4,714
    First time I've seen reflective vests described as professional cycling equipment.

    Not sure what you're planning, but I suspect it may be a solution looking for a problem...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 28,503
    Done. Would be good to have more details of the proposal, albeit in due course.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • @PorlyWorly: pb fixed, @TGOTB: fair point but not every cyclists invest in a reflective vest.
    @both: thanks for completing the survey.
  • t4tomo
    t4tomo Posts: 2,643
    camilg wrote:
    I am a cyclist/ entrepreneur with an idea of an innovative sportswear that will improve the journey of commuter cyclists on rainy days. Cami

    waterproof clothing has already been invented
    Bianchi Infinito CV
    Bianchi Via Nirone 7 Ultegra
    Brompton S Type
    Carrera Vengeance Ultimate Ltd
    Gary Fisher Aquila '98
    Front half of a Viking Saratoga Tandem
  • tgotb
    tgotb Posts: 4,714
    camilg wrote:
    @TGOTB: fair point but not every cyclists invest in a reflective vest.
    My point was that more serious cyclists are significantly *less* likely to wear a reflective vest. On my commute there's a very strong negative correlation between speed and wearing of reflective vests.
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • daviesee
    daviesee Posts: 6,386
    Done but with major flaws.

    1. I will cycle in heavy rain, but only going home. Putting on gear that was soaked through from cycling to work after a days shift does not appeal.

    2. You cannot put a reflective vest in the Professional Equipment section. It simply isnt.

    3. There is no accounting for the fact that my gear already has reflective strips.
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 28,503
    daviesee wrote:
    Done but with major flaws.

    1. I will cycle in heavy rain, but only going home. Putting on gear that was soaked through from cycling to work after a days shift does not appeal.

    2. You cannot put a reflective vest in the Professional Equipment section. It simply isnt.

    3. There is no accounting for the fact that my gear already has reflective strips.

    WRT point 1, the OP may want to consider how easy to dry the garment (?) is. I'm lucky in that even after a soaking in the morning, I can hang my kit out at work and have (near enough) dry clothes to ride home. Socks and shoes are the difficult ones.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • daviesee
    daviesee Posts: 6,386
    rjsterry wrote:
    WRT point 1, the OP may want to consider how easy to dry the garment (?) is. I'm lucky in that even after a soaking in the morning, I can hang my kit out at work and have (near enough) dry clothes to ride home. Socks and shoes are the difficult ones.
    For clarity, I cannot hang my clothes up to dry. H&S gone mad.
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • daviesee wrote:
    rjsterry wrote:
    WRT point 1, the OP may want to consider how easy to dry the garment (?) is. I'm lucky in that even after a soaking in the morning, I can hang my kit out at work and have (near enough) dry clothes to ride home. Socks and shoes are the difficult ones.
    For clarity, I cannot hang my clothes up to dry. H&S gone mad.
    Can you not dry it on your bike? That assumes you got a safe&private parking facilities
    I keep dry sock at work and try to protect my shoes as much as possible: I found the worst is having wet feet, I'm not bothered too much about the rest.
  • tgotb
    tgotb Posts: 4,714
    daviesee wrote:
    For clarity, I cannot hang my clothes up to dry. H&S gone mad.
    Depends; some people's cycling kit is as much in danger of breaching the Geneva Convention as it is of breaching mere H&S guidelines...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • daviesee
    daviesee Posts: 6,386
    hegyestomi wrote:
    Can you not dry it on your bike? That assumes you got a safe&private parking facilities .
    I have secure parking, but dry your clothes outside?
    In Scotland?

    And I dont fancy having to chain up my clothes. :wink:
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • TGOTB wrote:
    camilg wrote:
    @TGOTB: fair point but not every cyclists invest in a reflective vest.
    My point was that more serious cyclists are significantly *less* likely to wear a reflective vest. On my commute there's a very strong negative correlation between speed and wearing of reflective vests.

    I now agree with your point. I took the reflective vest off specialist cycling equipment. Thanks for pointing this out.
  • OK, done, but please change the icon for the 45-55 age group from someone that looks about 70 ...
    Shut up, knees!

    Various Boardmans, a Focus, a Cannondale and an ancient Trek.
  • I don't see how those question can result in an innovative useful product that well equipped cyclists would want to spend more money on.
  • The Rookie
    The Rookie Posts: 27,812
    What is the difference between professional parts and normal bike parts?
    Currently riding a Whyte T130C, X0 drivetrain, Magura Trail brakes converted to mixed wheel size (homebuilt wheels) with 140mm Fox 34 Rhythm and RP23 suspension. 12.2Kg.
  • I was quite offended by the icon of the man in his 40s..
  • rubertoe
    rubertoe Posts: 3,994
    It crashed so I didnt bother.
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • tgotb
    tgotb Posts: 4,714
    fatsmoker wrote:
    I was quite offended by the icon of the man in his 40s..
    That's how the yoof of today sees us, innit.

    Now, if I could only remember where I left my pipe and slippers...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • sswiss
    sswiss Posts: 354
    TGOTB wrote:
    fatsmoker wrote:
    I was quite offended by the icon of the man in his 40s..
    That's how the yoof of today sees us, innit.

    Now, if I could only remember where I left my pipe and slippers...

    I am that icon!
  • Headhuunter
    Headhuunter Posts: 6,494
    fatsmoker wrote:
    I was quite offended by the icon of the man in his 40s..
    Yeah that peed me off too! Some grey haired OAP wearing a tank top? Is this the 1950s?!
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • rubertoe
    rubertoe Posts: 3,994
    fatsmoker wrote:
    I was quite offended by the icon of the man in his 40s..
    Yeah that peed me off too! Some grey haired OAP wearing a tank top? Is this the 1950s?!


    *****Wanders off to remove tank top********
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • bigmonka
    bigmonka Posts: 361
    I did the survey but wasn't too sure about the questions on 'what do you normally wear' - as this depends on time of year, weather etc
  • vermin
    vermin Posts: 1,739
    Why do you like to get changed after cycling to work? LOL.
  • asprilla
    asprilla Posts: 8,440
    vermin wrote:
    Why do you like to get changed after cycling to work? LOL.

    Yeah, that raised an eyebrow.
    Mud - Genesis Vapour CCX
    Race - Fuji Norcom Straight
    Sun - Cervelo R3
    Winter / Commute - Dolan ADX
  • Lets hope he's better at clothing than he is at questionaires :roll:
  • wandsworth wrote:
    OK, done, but please change the icon for the 45-55 age group from someone that looks about 70 ...
    Sorry guys I can't change this icons... There are the default icons for this demographic question..
  • tgotb
    tgotb Posts: 4,714
    camilg wrote:
    wandsworth wrote:
    OK, done, but please change the icon for the 45-55 age group from someone that looks about 70 ...
    Sorry guys I can't change this icons... There are the default icons for this demographic question..
    You know, when I was your age, icons hadn't even been invented! Now, who fancies a Werther's Original?
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • kieranb
    kieranb Posts: 1,674
    I did the survey, must admit I can't think what this new gear could offer. As some one else said drying gear at the office can be a problem - also for me next jacket I would buy is one where the sleeves can come off to turn into a gillet. How about a jacket glove combo where the gloves zip or velco to the end of the sleeves to stop the winf and rain getting in?
  • wgwarburton
    wgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    Asprilla wrote:
    vermin wrote:
    Why do you like to get changed after cycling to work? LOL.

    Yeah, that raised an eyebrow.

    Why?

    If you pootle to work and don't need to wear a suit then it's pretty likely that you'll only need to change if the weather's grotty and you have got wet... which is what the OP is trying to address, IIUC...

    Cheers,
    W.