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Northwave winter boots

mattgeezermattgeezer Posts: 1,805
edited November 2013 in Road buying advice
Looking at getting a pair of these for the road bike,
Has anyone used the fahrenheit and the arctic are the latter much warmer/worth the extra 30£?

Cheers
Allez 2013
Pitch 2011
GT Moto 2003
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Posts

  • Sent mine back, as went for one ride and filled with water, mybe it was running down my leg, but not risking it for £120, I am hoping they refund them but if they send a new pair then I will give them another go as although wet, they were still warm.
  • GGBikerGGBiker Posts: 450
    I have the Fahrenheit, they are great with a pair of warm socks. I wore them all of last autumn/winter/spring with no problems.

    They are much better than overshoes at keeping feet dry (road spray water gets in around the cleat hole on overshoes)
    but if it's lashing down then water will run down your legs and nothing will keep you dry. As mentioned the water will warm up like a wetsuit with these so you'll stay comfortable. I found this to be more of a problem with overshoes than with these.

    In summary money well spent for me. Can't imagine you would need the arctic as our winters are mild compared to continental Europe, certainly not arctic or even Alpine!
  • I have the Northwave Celcius Arctic. Very warm (as long as you get a size to allow thick socks + wiggle room) and completely waterproof apart from (obviously) the big 'ole on the top where your foot goes in.

    If you know you're heading for a deluge you can seal the top opening (eg with a section of dry suit rubber ankle seal or just tape to your skin) and then fit your winter tights over the top of this. Having said that, they work like wetsuit boots when wet anyway so you should not get evaporation-induced chill.

    Having tried many multi layered solutions (food bags, double overshoes etc etc) which are good, but a royal pain, these Northwave boots are superb whether it's cold and wet or just cold - I've had mine down to around 3 degrees so far but plan plenty of sub-zero days this winter.

    The "Artic" (as they spell it!) have a fleece lining but to be honest a pair of thin merino socks would do the same thing at a guess. Again, it's all about hassle-saving foot warmth for me, so the Arctic are the best solution in this respect.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Any winter boot cannot prevent water running down your leg - fit some mudguards to prevent the spray.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • maddog 2maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    I have the Artics and they are excellent. The top opening is an issue, as mentioned, but I use the drysuit gaiter approach as bordersroadie says.

    Wouldn't go back to overshoes.
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    I got pursuaded to go for the standard ones by Evans and have always regretted it. Even with overshoes my feet are still cold. I suspect the Artics (Northwave - learn to spell!) would make little difference but it is irritating not to know. And I'm too tight to replace them til they wear out and that will probably be sometime around 2019!

    Not really sure what MicktheMove was expecting - these are good boots but they don't have an anti gravity field. A combination of the boots, good thick overshoes and tights over longish calf sealskin socks should keep your feet dry for a good while (if not the boot inner) but even there, eventually enough water soaks through the tights to get inside the socks. Mudguards, as said, help.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Rolf F wrote:
    I got pursuaded to go for the standard ones by Evans and have always regretted it. Even with overshoes my feet are still cold. I suspect the Artics (Northwave - learn to spell!) would make little difference but it is irritating not to know. And I'm too tight to replace them til they wear out and that will probably be sometime around 2019!

    Not really sure what MicktheMove was expecting - these are good boots but they don't have an anti gravity field. A combination of the boots, good thick overshoes and tights over longish calf sealskin socks should keep your feet dry for a good while (if not the boot inner) but even there, eventually enough water soaks through the tights to get inside the socks. Mudguards, as said, help.

    it was the case that one shoe was a lot worse than the other that made me return them, thats all, I would have also expected a tighter seal round the top of the boot. As i said they are warm and i have brought a pair of overboots with what looks like a tight seal around the top so when they are replaced i think i will be sorted.
  • I have used the Northwave Farenhiets for the last two winters and can highly recommend them for the cold however the waterproof qualities are questionable as water will eventually just run down inside but I bought them for warmth as I only wear them when it's freezing cold and for this they do a sterling job
    Zesty 514 Scott Scale 20 GT Expert HalfwayupMTB
  • jordan_217jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    The neoprene cuff on the boots would be better if it was 3 or 4 inches longer, so it acted more like a gaiter.
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,367
    I also use the Northwave Fahrenheit GTX and have found them to be warm enough (I use overshoes as well when really cold). I managed to solve the water ingress problem by getting some tight neoprene gaiters by Protective in the Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative sale last year. They form an effective seal over the top of the boot, and water runs off it. Had a quick look on their website though and they don't seem to stock them anymore...
    Titus Silk Road Ti rigid 29er - Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose singlespeed - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • 2 degrees C (12 mile) ride home this evening, pair of thin cycling socks plus normal cotton work socks (ie not the ideal combo) and feet stayed warm although toes a bit cold (Celcius Arctic boots). I needed the wool socks today really but this is the boots' lowest temp test to date.
  • DrLexDrLex Posts: 2,142
    If you do buy, remember to check the tightness of the studs at the toe end; I didn't and lost one in the first week's use. :oops: A replacement set of four is £3.99 + p&p from i-ride or a cheaper pack of rugger boot studs from a decent sports shop (a dozen cost me £3.50)
    Location: ciderspace
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    DrLex wrote:
    If you do buy, remember to check the tightness of the studs at the toe end; I didn't and lost one in the first week's use. :oops: A replacement set of four is £3.99 + p&p from i-ride or a cheaper pack of rugger boot studs from a decent sports shop (a dozen cost me £3.50)

    Or just do the sensible thing and take them off. They are only of any use if you need them for off road walking. They making putting overshoes on awkward anyway.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Tom DeanTom Dean Posts: 1,723
    Sent mine back, as went for one ride and filled with water, mybe it was running down my leg, but not risking it for £120, I am hoping they refund them but if they send a new pair then I will give them another go as although wet, they were still warm.
    HOpefully they will send you a new pair without those holes that let the water in :roll:
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    Just buy a pair of normal shoes a size up from normal, neoprene overshoes and good socks and save the money. I've tried a few pairs of winter boots and hated them all - heavy, restrictive, not waterproof in real rain (even with mudguards) and not actually much warmer. I think folk tend to compare them to their summer shoes which are probably too tight if you wear thick socks and most have loads of vents which need taping over.
    More problems but still living....
  • jordan_217jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    amaferanga wrote:
    Just buy a pair of normal shoes a size up from normal, neoprene overshoes and good socks and save the money. I've tried a few pairs of winter boots and hated them all - heavy, restrictive, not waterproof in real rain (even with mudguards) and not actually much warmer. I think folk tend to compare them to their summer shoes which are probably too tight if you wear thick socks and most have loads of vents which need taping over.

    My usual road shoes are Northwave Extreme techs - a nice feature of these shoes is that they're supplied with two types of insole - a thicker one for when you wear Summer weight socks and a thinner one for when you're wearing Winter weight socks. Simple but effective as my shoes fit exactly the same when using the Winter/Summer sock/insole combo.

    It would make life much easier if more manufacturers done this.
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • DrLexDrLex Posts: 2,142
    amaferanga wrote:
    Just buy a pair of normal shoes a size up from normal, neoprene overshoes and good socks and save the money. [...]
    Which is about the price of a pair of boots. Personally, I love mine after a fortnight's use - warmer, drier & quicker than shoes & overshoes. If you've decided you want a pair, the next decisions are budget & brand/fit.
    Location: ciderspace
  • DrLex wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    Just buy a pair of normal shoes a size up from normal, neoprene overshoes and good socks and save the money. [...]
    Which is about the price of a pair of boots. Personally, I love mine after a fortnight's use - warmer, drier & quicker than shoes & overshoes. If you've decided you want a pair, the next decisions are budget & brand/fit.

    I think some miss the point of these boots, it's not that they are much warmer/drier than alternatives, just massively less hassle.

    The alternative option for me (summer shoes (with wiggle room of course) + foodbags + thin overshoes + neoprene overshoes) keep your feet just as warm/dry but the convenience of the Northwave boots when commuting (or when not too) is worth the money imho.

    Getting the MTB version (Celcius) adds another advantage, that you can clump about in snow/ice/mud etc without worrying about ruining your neoprene overshoes. I love the fact that I don't have to do my daily hopping ritual when I arrive at work/home to remove all the overshoes etc before trying to walk.
  • bigpiklebigpikle Posts: 1,690
    I bought the Fahrenheits a few years ago in the bargain summer sales. They are a huge improvement over shoes and overshoes etc although not perfect as some have said.

    I bought larger but still find wearing thick merino socks makes them tight, and tight shoes reduce circulation and make your feet colder. I now have some great Prendas mid-weight socks that fit well and are warm. The boot is much much warmer and when the temps get close to 0 degs I put on a neoprene overshoe for a little extra protection.

    I have also found that layering some neoprene toe-things, oversocks and then overshoes over standard road shoes can also make for a fairly warm foot, and for those that dont suffer the cold quite as much its probably a good solution, but I always get cold feet after a few hours on long rides and the winter boots are a much better option for me. First ride in them today as it was 2 degs when I left and had comfy toasty feet all the way!
    Your Past is Not Your Potential...
  • mattgeezermattgeezer Posts: 1,805
    Just seen you can pick the farenheits up for just over100 but think ill go with the artics for extra warmth and colour!

    I take a 43 in normal shoes, 44 in my lg road shoes should i go 44 in these? Are they small anyway or do they fit similar to normal footwear? Thanks
    Allez 2013
    Pitch 2011
    GT Moto 2003
  • nevmannevman Posts: 1,611
    I usually go one size up but they are generous so you should be ok with normal size.
    Whats the solution? Just pedal faster you baby.

    Summer B,man Team Carbon LE#222
    Winter Alan Top Cross
    All rounder Spec. Allez.
  • carefulcareful Posts: 720
    I take a 43 in normal shoes, 44 in my lg road shoes should i go 44 in these? Are they small anyway or do they fit similar to normal footwear?

    Just got a pair of artics today, so I cant comment on warmth etc. yet. As for size, I would definitely size up. Size 46 fit me snuggly with wooly bullies (not tight or loose), a tiny bit shorter & wider than my Shimano shoes and winter boots which are also 46. In non-cycling shoes I am usually 45 or 45.5.
  • jordan_217jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    mattgeezer wrote:
    Just seen you can pick the farenheits up for just over100 but think ill go with the artics for extra warmth and colour!

    I take a 43 in normal shoes, 44 in my lg road shoes should i go 44 in these? Are they small anyway or do they fit similar to normal footwear? Thanks

    For NW's they do come up small. I take a full size larger in theses than I do with my other NW shoes. You could always get from Wiggle or CRC and use Collect+ to return free of charge. They should price match too.
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • vs4bvs4b Posts: 257
    My first ride in new north waves today. They are nice and warm and the most comfy cycling shoes I've tried. I got a 48 as the 47 seemed just a tiny bit snug, the 48 s are tiny bit big but with woolie socks they're fine. So far, we'll impressed. Shout for winstanleys too for their impeccable service whilst I dithered over which size I needed and broke their returns policy. They could not have been more helpful and thy we're only 120 quid too, if that can fe described as only!
  • I bought some Northwave Fahrenheit GTX boots this week. I take a 46 in Shimano & Spesh shoes which are a snug fit on me. I went 47 on Sidi's after web research said they come up a small fit. Again these for me a good snug fit. I did some searching on the NW's & after seeimg guys reporting a roomy fit I resisted the temptation to go 47 & stuck with a 46. Even with 46s my toes always touch the endof the shoes & wear holes inmy cycling socks! :cry:

    Anyway got the 46's delivered bought online 10% extra off so £109.34 tried them on they seemed very roomy in the toe box area with no way of pulling them in like normal road shoes.I put my Look Keos cleats on & placet he cleat to keep my shoes as far away from the cranks as they will go to avoid scuff marks on my cranks.

    I went for a 24 mile test ride. Dam these things are heavy in like cycling in diving boots or Doc Martins! My feet were toasty warm & there was no rain so I can't comment on the water proof side of things.

    When I got home the first thing I always do is clean my bike before I put it away. To my horror there was a huge scuff mark on the drive side crank arm near the centre of the chainrings which looks like it caused by the new boots. All the black paint was scuffed away in a 1"long arc as the ankle area of the boots scuffed by with every pedal stroke. when I checked the boots there was quite a bulge on the ankle area of the boots but worse on the right boot which had been contacing the crank arm & there was evidence of them rubbing away my paint as the right one was marked. The left was not marked & the ankle bulge was not as bad as the right one.

    None of my previuos 3 pairs of road shoes have ever contacted the crank arms in 12,000 miles and 2 years of riding. There is no way of pulling this area of the boots in by doing them up any tighter. The quick lace system is junk your left with 6" of lace to tuck done in the top of your boots. On the whole the worst cycling purchase I made in 2 years I going back to summer shoes and overshoes.

    I contact the seller a large cycling online retailer & they said send them back as awarranty claim so they went back this afternoon & I asked for a full refund.

    I am most disappointed in these Northwave Fahrenheit GTX boots they are a sloppy fit by road shoe standards and mine had a fault on them which causes them to bulge out at the ankles. Hopefully I will get my money back. All the negative stuff I saw in my web research proved to be right and some in my case. You may think why did you buy them if there was negative feedback on them. The answer is there was lots more positive feedback so I just took into account the sizing thing.

    Another observation I will make is they feel OK walking out to the garage to get the bike but when you start to ride boy do they feel heavy then!

    Think very long & hard before you waste over £100 on these winter boots! :evil:
  • bigpiklebigpikle Posts: 1,690
    sounds like a poor experience but I know loads of people with them, myself included, who've never had any issues. They are heavy the first time out but after a few miles you forget. I'd rather have heavier warm boots than lightweight freezing feet!
    Your Past is Not Your Potential...
  • I Dam these things are heavy in like cycling in diving boots or Doc Martins!

    No they are not, it's in your head because of their visual bulk. I just weighed them - and believe it or not they are lighter than the equivalent shoe/overshoe combo!

    Option 1: Northwave Celcius Arctic size 43, bone dry, with metal SPD cleat. Average weight per boot: 503g

    Option 2: Specialized S-Works MTB shoe, size 43, bone dry, with metal SPD cleat + Plastic food bag + lightweight stretch overshoe + BBB Hardwear neoprene overshoe. Average weight per foot: 547g

    Option 3: as above but no lightweight overshoe but an additional thin pair of socks instead. Average weight per foot: 519g

    The S-Works is one of the lightest shoes available and the set up listed gives approximately the same waterproofness/warmth as the Northwaves, but with a whole load more hassle obviously.

    So, proof that despite the apparent bulk of the Northwaves, they are, in fact, a lighter option for deep winter riding. When you get them out of the box, they do surprise you how light they are, and you get the same impression when you walk in them (as ineedalager noted). The "bulk" of them is invisible once I'm riding, I just forget about them and revel in the smug feeling of having such warm feet!
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    I Dam these things are heavy in like cycling in diving boots or Doc Martins!

    No they are not, it's in your head because of their visual bulk. I just weighed them - and believe it or not they are lighter than the equivalent shoe/overshoe combo!

    Option 1: Northwave Celcius Arctic size 43, bone dry, with metal SPD cleat. Average weight per boot: 503g

    Option 2: Specialized S-Works MTB shoe, size 43, bone dry, with metal SPD cleat + Plastic food bag + lightweight stretch overshoe + BBB Hardwear neoprene overshoe. Average weight per foot: 547g

    Option 3: as above but no lightweight overshoe but an additional thin pair of socks instead. Average weight per foot: 519g

    The S-Works is one of the lightest shoes available and the set up listed gives approximately the same waterproofness/warmth as the Northwaves, but with a whole load more hassle obviously.

    So, proof that despite the apparent bulk of the Northwaves, they are, in fact, a lighter option for deep winter riding. When you get them out of the box, they do surprise you how light they are, and you get the same impression when you walk in them (as ineedalager noted). The "bulk" of them is invisible once I'm riding, I just forget about them and revel in the smug feeling of having such warm feet!

    They're bloody heavy compared to good carbon soled shoes and don't make me laugh by claiming they keep your feet dry on properly wet roads.
    More problems but still living....
  • amaferanga wrote:
    They're bloody heavy compared to good carbon soled shoes and don't make me laugh by claiming they keep your feet dry on properly wet roads.

    I think you've missed the point and are comparing apples with oranges - the point being that lightweight carbon sole shoes (like my S-Works) don't keep you warm and dry in deep winter unless you add a whole load of weight in the form of overshoes etc. which ends up a heavier option, as I describe so beautifully above. :D

    And giggle away, the Goretex Northwaves keep your feet dry* in the most torrential rain and on Scottish roads which I can assure you get "properly" wet.

    * apart from that big hole in the top where you put your foot in (although a drysuit ankle seal can be used to effectively seal that for long wet rides).
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,367

    And giggle away, the Goretex Northwaves keep your feet dry* in the most torrential rain and on Scottish roads which I can assure you get "properly" wet.

    * apart from that big hole in the top where you put your foot in (although a drysuit ankle seal can be used to effectively seal that for long wet rides).

    +1, well said. Especially with the caveat that, in persistent rain, an extra neoprene seal between boot top and leg is best. That would apply to all boots though (and overshoes to an extent?). Looks like a gap in the market for these seeings as I can't find the Protective jobbies I use on the web anymore. Will keep looking and if I find them will post a link :wink:
    Titus Silk Road Ti rigid 29er - Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose singlespeed - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
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