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Paulus Quiros bikes

skinnyTskinnyT Posts: 73
edited January 2016 in Road buying advice
I am thinking of getting a custom bike, one option being Paulus Quiros. Does anyone have any experiences of them good or bad?

http://www.paulusquiros.co.uk/

thanks
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Posts

  • stevevwstevevw Posts: 84
    I do

    b123726e-a0ac-4ec6-83a4-29f944a06043_zpsa8fa4484.jpg

    They are a fantastic company to work with. I got exactly what I wanted and more, the whole experience was something very special that will be with me forever as will my bike. I say my bike, Jose likes to think that all his bikes are only on loan to the people that commission them.

    DSCF6391-2_zps58316cbc.jpg

    DSCF6395.jpg

    DSCF6615_zps351d35a3.jpg

    If you want to know anything more just ask and I will be glad to give you any information you need.

    Steve
  • bmxboy10bmxboy10 Posts: 1,917
    Steve that looks amazing and is the sort of bike I am after. Looks like it will be out of my price range especially in 953. Do they make frames and forks in 853?
  • stevevwstevevw Posts: 84
    Paulus Quiros can make you a frame out of any tubing you desire, they may draw the line at 15mm plumbers copper though. :0)

    Just give Jose or Jonathan a ring they will be able to discuss with you what you need. All you have to do is have a firm idea what the bike will be used for. They will then do all the hard work of calculating what tubing to use where and the geometry best suited to you and the application.

    I was lucky that I knew exactly what I wanted down to the last washer. I had a MTB crash which broke my shoulder so I was off the bike for a few months that gave me time and something to keep me occupied while I recovered. The first contact I had with Paulus Quiros was an email that I sent out to 7 frame builders, where I gave a rough outline of what I wanted and asking for a idea of cost. Jonathan was 1 of only 3 replies that came back, His email was by far the most informative and sounded like they really wanted to build me a bike. From here we swapped emails about my size weight and expectations. We then arranged for me to go down for a face to face chat and bike fit, Jonathan even picked me up from the station. This was the first time that I met Jose, as I walked in and Jonathan introduced me Jose looked me up and down, he said hello we shook hands and he was off fetling a bike. I thought this a bit odd but had things to discuss with Jonathan and a look round the workshop to distract me. Before the bike fit it was decided that Jonathan and I would go on a short ride so they could see what sort of rider I am, it was then that it clicked what Jose had been doing to the bike. I sat on it and it was a near perfect fit only needing the seat raising no more than 5mm. After the ride I remember thinking that this bike was near perfect for me, Jose said my bike would be much better. I was skeptical but he was right the bike is the best I have ever ridden and ridden it has been 4000+ miles so far.

    Price for me was very reasonable and what you have to take in to account, this will be a once in a lifetime purchase a bike for life. Made from steel it will be repairable and will be easily modified for the advances in groupsets. I will be waiting for Campagnolo to bring out their electronic, triple, 12 speed, hydro disc group before mine gets changed.
  • A stunning looking bike.

    Stevevw sent you a PM
  • As another Paulus Quiros owner, I have to second everything that stevevw says above.

    Here's mine http://www.flickr.com/photos/mike-531/

    It's a much simpler bike than stevevw, which I saw at this years Bristol Bespoked show as well as in, if I remember right, a several page article in Cycling Active. An absolutely stunning bike that Jose and Jonathan refer to as a joint project with steve. Mine is Reynolds 525 with stainless stel polished dropouts, more of a european 80's style road bike - just enough clearnce for 28mm tyres if I ever get over to Flanders, no mudguard eyelets. It rides faultlessly - sure footed, predictable, 'flickable' if I want to, doesn't under or over steer going downhill into tight corners. Lovely. And I didn't expect the celtic knotwork on the seatstay wrapover extension but I love the fact that it's there. I was an 'early adopter' (they're the most local of all the custom builders to me..) and I've had the bike about three years and several thousand miles now.
    Jon & Jose are approachable and knowledgable, friendly but not pushy. They listen to what you are looking for and go on from there. I can't recommend them highly enough.
    I think there's a good reason that they won one of the Peer to Peer awards at the Bristol show, that's the one that the exhibitors themselves vote for during the show and is awarded a few weeks later - it doesn't garner the publicity that the other awards do but it shows how highly they must be thought of. If the TdF ever gets to Wales I expect to see Jose and Jon in the promo video!
  • I do like the Celtic motif and its good to get a long term view of an owner thanks. Like Stevevw I have sent a few emails out and didnt get many replies but Paulus Quiros was almost immediate with good info. I am proably sold on one.
  • I'm glad you like it, it's a great bike to ride and a very special part of it was being involved with the design and the making of it (I got to polish my own lugs...). As with Stevew if you have anything I can answer then send a direct message anytime and keep us up to date with how the build turns out.
    I need to phone Jose myself... it's time I asked him to make me a stem to go on his bike!
  • " it's time I asked him to make me a stem to go on his bike!" :0)

    "I think there's a good reason that they won one of the Peer to Peer awards at the Bristol show"
    The only reason they do not win ALL the awards is they ask not to be included in the voting. I do agree the Peer to Peer is the most prestigious award, given by the people that really know how good Paulus Quiros bikes are.

    If you are near North Herts and want to see my bike get in touch.
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    ynyswen24 wrote:
    I'm glad you like it, it's a great bike to ride and a very special part of it was being involved with the design and the making of it (I got to polish my own lugs...).

    You pay all that money and you have to do the work yourself?!?

    No - that's a beauty with some delightful detailing.

    Lovely!
  • marcusjb wrote:
    ynyswen24 wrote:
    I'm glad you like it, it's a great bike to ride and a very special part of it was being involved with the design and the making of it (I got to polish my own lugs...).

    You pay all that money and you have to do the work yourself?!?

    No - that's a beauty with some delightful detailing.

    Lovely!

    Polishing my own lugs is in no way a euphemism... and Jon did make me a cup of tea!

    stevew - I had a good look at your bike when Jon & Jose had it on display at Bespoked in Bristol this year. Between the three of you you made some good choices and came up with a stunner - that stem with the capacitors and electronics built in running off the dynamo front hub and charging your gps as well as powering the lights. My god...
  • "that stem with the capacitors and electronics built in running off the dynamo front hub and charging your gps as well as powering the lights."

    The electronics are in the steerer tube, the Stem only has the power take off. The rear light which is a 60's Miller has a capacitor and LED in it, My idea but Jose's execution.
  • Stevew:
    The electronics are in the steerer? That's even more impressive - it must be really tight for space in there, didn't realise that when I was talking to Jose in the show. I was there on the Saturday, don't know which day you were there but maybe we've already met without realising (though I guess they would have introduced us...)
    marcusjb:
    Yeah, it's a lovely bike (smiles to self).
    SkinnyT:
    you won't regret it if you commission one.
  • I went on the Sunday and took her home with me. She is currently living in the spare bedroom much to my wife's disgust.
    I have been told that the room is no longer spare as the new Granddaughter will be taking over soon. I may have to move out ;0)
  • ExmoormannExmoormann Posts: 2
    edited November 2013
    Paulus Quiros are a couple of gents who have a vast knowledge of not only the basics of bike building, but surpass many of their contemporary's with their unbelievable attention to not only you ( The Customer ) but also to their beautiful bikes and frames. If it is not spot on to them then they will tell you. Their products have to reach the quintessence of not only building your bike, but also the achievement of absolute perfection, otherwise you simply don't get it your frame or bike.

    Jonathan and Jose are the two partners so it is important that you know this as it is very satisfying to know that you can speak with the butcher and not his block!

    Jonathan delivered my beautiful Low Trail Randonneur on April the 31st this year and Jose delivered my 1971 W F Holdsworth Cyclone after a restoration, and it is a wonder that this bike bearing in mind its vintage has had the touch of true artisans, and brought her back, again.

    So not only are these two, brilliant engineers, they have a secret ingredient which is so hard to find.

    What is it I hear you say, OK when you buy a Paulus Quiros bike you firstly join an elite family, both Jose and Jonathan are simply like this, so look forward to a new experience, and a beautiful bike.

    Oh I nearly forgot want to see my bikes well just type the below and see for yourself.

    Go on I dare you.

    http://jeffdownes66.blogspot.co.uk

    http://jeffdownes6666.blogspot.co.uk
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,990
    Exmoormann wrote:
    Paulus Quiros are a couple of gents who have a vast knowledge of not only the basics of bike building, but surpass many of their contemporary's with their unbelievable attention to not only you ( The Customer ) but also to their beautiful bikes and frames. If it is not spot on to them then they will tell you. Their products have to reach the quintessence of not only building your bike, but also the achieving absolute perfection, otherwise you simply don't get it.

    7C754F7A-49B4-4A6C-B68D-063F358D1520_zpsdlm76e6t.gif
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • Hi,

    I am a bit late in joining this thread but in case all of those who have gone before me have not convinced you to give PQ a try I will throw in my 10 cents worth. I have just completed assembling my bike which Jose and Jonathan built for me, and I can say it is with out doubt the best bike I have ever ridden. Which is no mean feat considering I live in Australia and was unable to visit with them down in Wales. All of the design work was done over the phone and via sketches sent back and forth via email. Just to give some context I have 2 other custom built bikes one by Paul Villiers (Reynolds 853) and an Enigma Extensor (Columbus Xcr stainless) both of which are stunning and fantastic to ride, but my PQ is on another level both in looks and ride quality. This is one bike I don't think I will ever get tired of looking at or riding.

    Jose has managed to create at bike that has all day comfort like a good audax/touring bike, but is fast enough to race in anything but Cat 1 races. I have had this bike up to well over 80km/hr and not a hint of speed wobble or 'nervousness' about the handling. These guys really know their stuff, Jose even convinced me to try 160mm cranks which I was sceptical about at first, but absolutely love now (can spin much faster for longer).

    If you are serious about a custom build you will not be disappointed with these guys, I cannot recommend them enough.

    I have included a few pictures below of the finished bike, I had Jose make a steel fork and paint a carbon fork to match, for when I wanted to drop the weight of the bike as much as possible for long hill rides.
  • skinnyTskinnyT Posts: 73
    I ordered one. Very impressed so far, mainly dealt with Jose. I went to their workshop and spent about 5 hours there. Went for a ride and got measured. Jose set up the bike jig with the measurements for me to try and it felt much better than my current ride (too short seat tube, too long top tube). Spent a long time discussing how the bike would look as well. Its rare these days to find someone who wants to get things right for the customer.

    Now lots of other thing to decide. Disc brakes? Steel/carbon forks? Electronic shifting, Jose is thinking abut where to put the battery?

    So far so good, I will let you know how it turns out. :D
  • SkinnyT,

    I know you will not regret your decision, Jose borders on obsessive to get things right!

    I look forward to seeing your finished bike, I hope you don't have to wait too long.
  • stevevwstevevw Posts: 84
    I hope now you have pushed the button you will change this to a build thread. Looking forward to seeing another fine Paulus Quiros being born.

    For what it is worth I would go steel forks with disc brakes and electronic shifting with the battery in the seat tube.
  • +1 for the steel fork, but really depends on what you are primarily going to use the bike for. that said Jose can do some amazing things with steel forks to make the bike a truely personal build (something you just can't do with carbon). Hopefully by now reynolds will have thier stainless fork blades sorted or KVa have thier stainless blades EC certified, in which case you can get steel forks weighing in the same ball park as carbon forks (but never as low as carbon forks like enve or columbus minimal). I couldn't make my mind up so I got one of each, but I appreciate not everyone's budget can run to this, and if I had to choose one it would be steel. I am sure in 20 years time the steel fork will be the one I am still using.

    What material are you using for your build? 525, 753, 853, 953?

    I didn't go for disc brakes purely because my PQ will rarely see wet weather so not really required, but again if this was my only bike for year round use, then discs would definately be in the build. I love the Audax bike that PQ built and is shown earlier in this forum and would build something very similar if I was building an Audax bike for myself.

    I hope you enjoy speccing your bike as much as I did and keep us informed of which way you go.
  • stevevwstevevw Posts: 84
    My Audax bike is now used for winter club runs too. I love riding it so much that I use it as much as possible whatever the weather. It is a thing of beauty and a work of art but at the end of the day it is a bike and needs to be ridden to be fully appreciated. The only duty my Paulus Quiros does very rarely is the daily commute and that is only because I like to ride fixed.
  • bondurantbondurant Posts: 858
    Are these truly custom frames? The reason I ask is seeing the spacers on the bike posted on the previous page. Unless for some reason you would choose to have that many?
  • The spacers are there because I wanted a classic frame with a horizontal head tube, if the head tube was longer I would either have to have a sloping top tube, or risk my wedding tackle every time I stopped. I thought that the look would be more like the quill stems of old that typically had 25 - 30mm of rise from the head set (I did consider a quill stem but this would limit the fork choice). With the modern frames the idea is to have the top tube longer and the stem 'slammed' to the headset, which works with modern compact style frames with sloping top tubes.
  • stevevwstevevw Posts: 84
    Yes they are truly custom frames, forks and stems. I agree with Tbelcher72. My bike also has a few spacers for exactly the same reason. You only have to look at classic bikes with quill stems to see we are not doing anything different positioning the bars to suit the rider.
  • As suggested I will turn this into a build thread now. The bike will be 853 with steel forks with the option of carbon if I want later. It will have disc brakes and electronic shifting, Jose is figuring out the best place for the battery. I haven’t decided much yet, to many decisions.

    Groupset: Shimano seems to be the only ones with a working hydraulic brake system. Ultegra Di2 seems the best value for money. Should I go for the R785 non series brakes or go with the standard cable and something from e.g. TRP
    http://www.trpbrakes.com/category.php?p ... &catid=206
    http://www.trpbrakes.com/category.php?p ... &catid=206
    and wait till Shimano develop their hydro brakes further then upgrade?

    Wheels: Not many road disc hubs and less disc only rims. I was thinking of Chris King R45 hubs but they are expensive. Paulus Quiros say they have seen them fail but... White Industries maybe? Emailed several wheel builders but they all come up with something different.

    Seatpost: Thompson Elite silver

    Bars and stem: ??? Most come in black and I want some shinny bits. I might just get Paulus Quiros to make a custom stem.

    Bars, stem and groupset all seem to come in black these days which I would rather not have.

    Like the look of these Specialites TA cranks in silver but the price!!
    http://www.chickencycles.co.uk/search.php

    Opinions and suggestions welcome.
  • Skinny T

    If your budget can stretch would definately recommend getting Jose to make a custom stem, I think it really pulls the whole thing together aesthetically. That said I have used the richey classic stem and bars on one of my other bikes and they look really good too (available in silver). Another option I explored was a Nitto bar and Stem but these can get pricey, but they are beautifully made (I use thier bars on my PQ build).

    The TA cranks are bonkers money, but are beautifully made, and as they are modular can be changed to any configuration you like at a later date (triple, compact double, road double etc). coupled with a phil wood bottom bracket they must be among the smoothest spinning chainsets in the world.

    I hope you have as much fun as I did when I worked with Jose to build mine.
  • Garry HGarry H Posts: 6,639
    stevevw wrote:
    Yes they are truly custom frames, forks and stems. I agree with Tbelcher72. My bike also has a few spacers for exactly the same reason. You only have to look at classic bikes with quill stems to see we are not doing anything different positioning the bars to suit the rider.
    why noy just go for a quill stem set up then? Or even an extended head tube...
  • Would it be bad form to ask what these beauties cost ?
  • BR 1979BR 1979 Posts: 296
    Sexy bikes. Always good to hear of such first rate customer service too.
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