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Which option do I take to get fit from today - turbo use

mosamosa Posts: 754
edited November 2013 in Training, fitness and health
Hello all I am starting at the wrong time of year back on my bike. Missed about a year if truth be known apart from a couple of rides. I did 10 miles yesterday. 15.1mph 40mins windy though as usual. Body felt fine but lungs nearly burst at times. My questions are. I've just bought a cheap turbo this morning. I dont have a garmin etc & I'm looking for advice to get me back into fitness 1 that will help me when I'm out on bike probably weekends now 2 to lose a bit weight. I have been looking at the sufferfest downloadable options but is there a one I need to start with or is there a mid range one that I could use that would work so I don't have to keep buying them. I just don't want to get bored and need to have some sort if structure laid out in front of me otherwise I will get bored. Also of I need to fuel whilst on turbo ? I know I need water but what about gels or anything it do I just do it to fatigue stage. Also how many times a week and for how long. Cheers in advance for any replies. Ps need to start today!
My bikes

2018 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro

Posts

  • bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
    Check out this book. The author is a dope but the content is good and gives you a choice of 4 different 12 week training plans that don't require a lot of time and are perfect for turbo.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/193403083X

    You don't need to fuel while on a turbo, especially if your goals include losing weight. Just eat normally and schedule a workout an hour or so after a meal.

    What you do need to do is ensure that you keep cool (buy a good fan or two) and drink a sensible amount of water (roughly 1l per hour). If you overheat your performance will suffer.
    Martin S. Newbury RC
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,990
    Get yourself the revolver video at www.thesufferfest.com it's the easiest to judge without speed sensors etc as each interval is flat out!
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • mosamosa Posts: 754
    Would that not be too difficult to start with?
    My bikes

    2018 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,990
    No, it is what it is mate. It's always hard, as you get fitter you just use bigger gears. It really kick started my riding many moons ago.
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • inseineinseine Posts: 5,785
    Firstly, this is the perfect time of year to start training! You've got a good 5 months to get fit before next spring.
    Remember, training should be progressive so don't overdo it to start with. From your base any cycling will get you fitter and you don't want to launch into it and be bored by Christmas.
    Always do 10 mins warming up/down, and you really don't need to push hard for the first few weeks.
    Enjoy it, you'll come on loads if you take it steady and build up slowly. You should try to get at least one longer road ride in a week.
  • +1 for above, spend the next 8-10 weeks building steady base miles, maybe some tempo work too, but mainly base. You can add some strength/power/speed and threshold early 2014, get out on some club runs, plenty clubs round Bedlington area, Cramlington CC ride out every weekend from Manor Walks shopping centre and do training loops on Tue and Thur nights. Barnesbury also do weekend rides, as do Wansbeck CC, riding with the clubs will make time fly as the miles roll off, get some good tips and advice too.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I'd do some base work too. Nice steady work for 40 mins or so after a 5 mins warmup and put a 5 mins cooldown on after.
    Get a few of those in per week and then start to introduce the intervals. You can burn yourself out with too much intensity too soon.

    As to losing weight - cut down on what you're eating. What you can burn off exercising is a small amount compared to the extra calories you can take in over the course of a week.
  • I'm looking to using sufferfest so Revolver is recommended here but the site says: 3 Video Starter Kit - $31.99
    New to Sufferlandria and not sure where to start? Our Starter Pack includes three essential videos: 1. The Downward Spiral: Short, sharp and ultra-high-intensity intervals. 2. Angels: Long climbs with brutal attacks and 3. The Long Scream: A 30:00 time trial requiring maximum concentration. Save $4 off the regular price.

    Anyone else use the 3 above and are they best for us starters?
  • meesterbondmeesterbond Posts: 1,240
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Get yourself the revolver video at http://www.thesufferfest.com it's the easiest to judge without speed sensors etc as each interval is flat out!


    You evil man.

    In all seriousness, the Sufferfest vids are as tough as you want to make them, although at full tilt, Revolver is best done with a bucket next to you - it is savage.
    Personally, I'd start with Angels and then maybe Local Hero. Hell Hath No Fury is pretty good too if memory serves.

    TrainerRoad is also worth a look too - I've worked my way through 3 seasons of Breaking Bad accompanied with the TrainerRoad workouts - makes turbo training almost enjoyable. TR is a subscription service though, but well worth the investment if you ask me.
  • mosamosa Posts: 754
    Cheers gents. Just an update. I purchased revolver and tried it tonight for the 1st time. Didn't really push it although I possibly gave it 70% which is quite a bit at my current fitness level. I completed warm up then 5 stages with a 5 min cool down. My legs were tight when I finished but wasn't hot due to my fan. My question now is do I do it every night or have a night off. Do I keep trying to increase the interval numbers? Will I see a benefit when I'm out on road? Felt as if I should have pushed for more but don't want to sicken myself early into it. I feel like I'm missing out if I have a night off even if I am it managing 25-30 mins currently. Please advise frequency & next steps. Thanks again
    My bikes

    2018 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,990
    Don't do it every night. Have at least a day off between those sorts of interval sessions. Going out for a normal ride would be fine though.
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • kev77kev77 Posts: 433
    Intervals 2 to 3 times a week is enough, supplement it with a club run if you are a member
  • Not sure now what you are looking at from your original post, I get the fitness and weight loss, which should be steady progress to build up, not over stress you and last longer (I am no expert of course). As above at this time of year, I and most people I know, opt for the Winter Base training as posted up in the thread, build endurance and base fitness for the coming season, then intervals early in 2014 to build on this base, increasing power, strength, threshold and speed giving you a good all round level of fitness. The sufferfest vid's are pretty good for intervals, and keep things a bit interesting, but not sure why you what to start interval training in Oct/Nov, especially if you've had a long lay off, no doubt they will bring some quick gains, however, I take it you have no plans to ride at pace for any long period of time doing short interval session's. If you ride hard for 25-30 min interval sessions, that's what you'll be good at, if you what to perform over longer rides, you need to do longer rides, and maybe avoid becoming a Xmas Star that's fizzles out before spring. If you are going to do intervals, make sure you rest properly between, 2-3 days hard work followed by 1-2 rest days, normally rest on the bike with easy rides. Nutrition, drink plenty as the intervals will make you sweat plenty, don't need any food during intervals, they're too short, some riders on the forum will tell you they ride upto 3hrs before eating, but eating protein within 30mins of finishing your work out will help repair muscle and recovery, put your feet up.
  • NapoleonD wrote:
    Get yourself the revolver video at http://www.thesufferfest.com it's the easiest to judge without speed sensors etc as each interval is flat out!


    I've worked my way through 3 seasons of Breaking Bad accompanied with the TrainerRoad workouts - makes turbo training almost enjoyable.

    How bloody good is that programme ? watched all 46 episodes in just over a week......... friggin awesome! (and I bloody hate that word!)
  • richaricha Posts: 1,634
    I've worked my way through 3 seasons of Breaking Bad accompanied with the TrainerRoad workouts - makes turbo training almost enjoyable.
    +1. I'm on series 5 of The Wire. Breaking Bad is next.
    Rich
  • JackPozziJackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    How do you manage to watch decent TV while turboing?? I tried to watch the Sopranos and after about three episodes I didn't have a clue what was going on, too busy focussing on riding to be able to concentrate on the TV properly! Nowadays I stick to watching stuff that doesn't require full attention but still helps to pass the time...
  • RichA wrote:
    I've worked my way through 3 seasons of Breaking Bad accompanied with the TrainerRoad workouts - makes turbo training almost enjoyable.
    +1. I'm on series 5 of The Wire. Breaking Bad is next.

    Prepare yourself Rich, breaking bad is the best drama I've ever watched. Still to see series five but one to four are addictive. Bryan Cranston's performance is stunning as is Giancarlo Esposito's.
  • richaricha Posts: 1,634
    JackPozzi wrote:
    How do you manage to watch decent TV while turboing?? I tried to watch the Sopranos and after about three episodes I didn't have a clue what was going on, too busy focussing on riding to be able to concentrate on the TV properly! Nowadays I stick to watching stuff that doesn't require full attention but still helps to pass the time...
    It depends on what you are doing. If it is, say, 5 min intervals then once up to target power all you are doing is maintaining cadence. Trainerroad helps big time as all the stats you need are right there on the screen.
    Rich
  • meesterbondmeesterbond Posts: 1,240
    As above - Trainer Road makes it prettty easy to check you're on track and unless you're doing 30sec intervals, the only time you need to really focus on is when you're increasing or decreasing power. The rest of the time you're just checking you're on target. I tend to use headphones too as it blocks everything else out, although they do get a bit sweaty!

    Having something distracting to watch / listen to is an absolutely must for me - if I don't have something to take my mind of the effort then I have a bad habit of just climbing off and doing something more intersting / less unpleasant.

    90mins - 2 hours really is my limit though.
  • I'm probably going to get a turbo for Christmas, so I'm having a relative rest at the moment, before Christmas. But come Boxing Day I'm on my training plan - [ I have no idea at the moment what that plan consists of! ]. Working up to the Evans Leeds sportive on the 9th March where I intend to dish out a severe beating to my friend.
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