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Easy on folding tyre

Slo Mo JonesSlo Mo Jones Posts: 272
edited August 2013 in Road beginners
Thought it would be good idea to get some new tyres in preparation for my forst 100 miler at RL100 at the weekend. Got some boring Continental GP4000s. Problem was they were an unbelievable bummer to get on the wheel. I'm just a beginner and only ever had to put a tube+tyre on once and managed that (schwalbe lugano) pretty easily by the roadside. After two exploding Conti race innner tubes I gave up and let the LBS sort it out.

However I'm a bit worried that now, if I do get a puncture on Sunday, I'm going to be completely screwed as I'll be unable to get the thing onto the wheel. Which will ruin my day somewhat.

So, my cunning plan is to buy a folding tyre renowned for being dead easy to get onto the wheel, even if it is a bit rubbish performance wise, and carry that with me for emergencies.

Know you of any such tyre?

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Sounds like the problem is in your fitting ability - as opposed to an issue with the tyres themselves. In any case, taking a spare tyre on your ride seems excessive, IMO...
  • Slo Mo JonesSlo Mo Jones Posts: 272
    Imposter wrote:
    Sounds like the problem is in your fitting ability - as opposed to an issue with the tyres themselves. In any case, taking a spare tyre on your ride seems excessive, IMO...

    Thanks for that, you complete nugget. I'm fully aware that I'm pants at fitting tyres, a fact alluded to by my reference to the fact that I've fitted one tyre in my life.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Imposter wrote:
    Sounds like the problem is in your fitting ability - as opposed to an issue with the tyres themselves. In any case, taking a spare tyre on your ride seems excessive, IMO...

    Thanks for that, you complete nugget. I'm fully aware that I'm pants at fitting tyres, a fact alluded to by my reference to the fact that I've fitted one tyre in my life.

    You're welcome. Ironic, you calling me a nugget, when I'm not the one who can't perform basic maintenance tasks. Perhaps if you told people what rims you have, you might get some useful tyre/rim fit recommendations. The rim is the metal bit that the tyre sits on, by the way.
  • Slo Mo JonesSlo Mo Jones Posts: 272
    Imposter wrote:
    Thanks for that, you complete nugget. I'm fully aware that I'm pants at fitting tyres, a fact alluded to by my reference to the fact that I've fitted one tyre in my life.

    You're welcome. Ironic, you calling me a nugget, when I'm not the one who can't perform basic maintenance tasks.

    That's because I'm a beginner, thus posting in the beginner's forum.

    They're fulcrum racing 5s.
  • pastey_boypastey_boy Posts: 2,540
    It comes down to tyre/rim combinations, I have Conti 4000's which are are very easy to mount. Not all rims are the same though, you could have a bad combo. I fitted a 4000s the other day for a bloke who had wrecked 3 tubes trying but I managed using just my thumbs. You will only know if a certain tyre will fit by actually trying before you buy.
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  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,490
    I've got GP4Seasons on FR5's - they're a bum to get on from scratch - but if you just take one side out to repair/replace the tube then it's not so bad.

    TBH I think you'd be better off practising changing a tube rather than buying another tyre ...

    Put some talk in the tyre first (inside) as it'll stop the tube from sticking to it whilst fitting.
    Also, you want to put a little air in the tube too - not too much, but enough that it sits in the tyre whilst you re-seat it.
    GP4000s are good tyres puncture & speed wise - so I wouldn't loose a lot of sleep over it.
  • dnwhite88dnwhite88 Posts: 285
    There's a knack to it mate and the only way to perfect it is to practice. If its any consolation a tyre can be tricky the first time before its stretched a bit. Either take the tyre off and practice a few times before the weekend (it gets easier every time) or hope that the people you ride with will help if the worst happens. I don't think bringing a different tyre is the answer, as you will probably struggle with that too and it's a waste of pocket space.

    EDIT:slowbike beat me too it!
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster"
  • dee4life2005dee4life2005 Posts: 773
    Also, if it happens to rain on your ride and you had to use the new tyre then it could cause you problems, as new tyres can be pretty sketchy in the wet until they've been scrubbed in for up to 50 miles due to the release agents used during the manufacturing process.

    Can't comment on your rim/tyre combo question though as I run Mavic Aksiums with GP4000s, and they are tough to get on that rim roo - although it is manageable without resorting to levers, just. There is definitely a knack to it though, and that only comes with practice - I would suggest practicing on the back wheel as sods law that's the one that always gets punctured (at least in my experience). I certainly wouldn't want to be using up a jersey pocket and carrying a spare tyre around on a 100miler myself - much rather use that space for more snacks :wink:

    Edit: Hopefully all goes well on the day, and there will be no visits from the P fairy.
  • cyclingfurycyclingfury Posts: 676
    Slo Mo, have a look on YouTube. There are some very good videos devoted to tyre changing. Don't worry, it's a skill you'll soon pick up.
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  • edhornbyedhornby Posts: 1,780
    I have fulcrum 5s and fresh tyres aren't easy to get on the first time - my commuter bike with mavic openpros are easy - but after a couple of on/off they are much easier when the tyre stretches a little

    only obvious tips I can think of are
    use good quality tyre levers
    put a 2 pumps of air in the tube to avoid pinches
    push the bead out of the rim track and into the well of the rim to give yourself a bit of working room and shuffle round with your hands to create slack
    take your time
    "I get paid to make other people suffer on my wheel, how good is that"
    --Jens Voight
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    slowbike wrote:
    I've got GP4Seasons on FR5's - they're a bum to get on from scratch - but if you just take one side out to repair/replace the tube then it's not so bad.

    TBH I think you'd be better off practising changing a tube rather than buying another tyre ...

    Put some talk in the tyre first (inside) as it'll stop the tube from sticking to it whilst fitting.
    Also, you want to put a little air in the tube too - not too much, but enough that it sits in the tyre whilst you re-seat it.
    GP4000s are good tyres puncture & speed wise - so I wouldn't loose a lot of sleep over it.

    Yes, talc does the trick for me with difficult tyre/rim combos, although it's a pain to have to carry talc with you on rides!
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • crankycrankcrankycrank Posts: 1,830
    Along with the other suggestions it's a good idea to practice, practice, practice. Try mounting the tyre without the tube a couple of times just to get the hang of it. Then if you have an old worn out tube try mounting the tyre with this a couple more times. The tyre should also start to loosen up a bit by this time and then go to using a good tube. Also go out in the yard as if you're out on a ride and remove/replace the wheel and tyre from the bike with the kit you carry with you, it's different than being in a nice clean house. Yes, it's a lot of time and effort to spend but the next time you have a puncture you'll be glad you took the time. Having recently waited 30 min. for a someone I was riding with to change his tube I can tell you the people you're riding with will appreciate having someone who's quick at it as well.
  • cattytowncattytown Posts: 647
    GP4000s are OK - I put some new 25s on my wheels recently without levers. While a little air helps avoid pinches, don't put much in. Start opposite the valve and make sure you pus the tyre into the middle of the will - just gives a few extra mm which can make all the difference.
    Giant Defy 2
    Large bloke getting smaller :-)
  • pdwpdw Posts: 315
    Have a look at:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XUFVrl0UT4

    The toe strap tip is overkill in most cases, but it shows the basic technique: go the other side of the wheel, push the bead down into the centre of the rim, then work round the edge of the wheel to create some slack.
  • Schoie81Schoie81 Posts: 749
    I've somehow managed to avoid getting a puncture so far, and have to admit I've never changed a tube - I will get caught out one of these days and really should have a practice. That said, my boss has had three punctures since he bought his new bike and he's managed to change them himself without too much of a problem. He is easily the least mechanically or practically minded person i've ever met, so i'm sure if he can do it, anyone can. As others have said, get on YouTube and then practice at home - and i'm going to do the same!!

    To the OP - just a thought, but if you get a folding tyre to take with you for use in an emergency, when you've fitted that at the side of the road, what are you going to do with the GP4000 you've taken off?
    "I look pretty young, but I'm just back-dated"
  • Slo Mo JonesSlo Mo Jones Posts: 272
    Schoie81 wrote:
    I've somehow managed to avoid getting a puncture so far, and have to admit I've never changed a tube - I will get caught out one of these days and really should have a practice. That said, my boss has had three punctures since he bought his new bike and he's managed to change them himself without too much of a problem. He is easily the least mechanically or practically minded person i've ever met, so i'm sure if he can do it, anyone can. As others have said, get on YouTube and then practice at home - and i'm going to do the same!!

    To the OP - just a thought, but if you get a folding tyre to take with you for use in an emergency, when you've fitted that at the side of the road, what are you going to do with the GP4000 you've taken off?

    bin it.

    Think i'll just gamble. Must make sure to avoid the potholes on the descent of Leith Hill though. Not an easy task.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Schoie81 wrote:
    I've somehow managed to avoid getting a puncture so far, and have to admit I've never changed a tube - I will get caught out one of these days and really should have a practice. That said, my boss has had three punctures since he bought his new bike and he's managed to change them himself without too much of a problem. He is easily the least mechanically or practically minded person i've ever met, so i'm sure if he can do it, anyone can. As others have said, get on YouTube and then practice at home - and i'm going to do the same!!

    To the OP - just a thought, but if you get a folding tyre to take with you for use in an emergency, when you've fitted that at the side of the road, what are you going to do with the GP4000 you've taken off?

    bin it.

    Think i'll just gamble. Must make sure to avoid the potholes on the descent of Leith Hill though. Not an easy task.

    What? You are going to 'bin' a £40 tyre, just because you got a flat?
  • dnwhite88dnwhite88 Posts: 285
    No, thankfully he sounds like he has dropped the new tyre idea. You will be fine mate, and if you need to change a flat just don't rush it or let it frustrate you and you'll be fine
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster"
  • Slo Mo JonesSlo Mo Jones Posts: 272
    Imposter wrote:
    Schoie81 wrote:
    I've somehow managed to avoid getting a puncture so far, and have to admit I've never changed a tube - I will get caught out one of these days and really should have a practice. That said, my boss has had three punctures since he bought his new bike and he's managed to change them himself without too much of a problem. He is easily the least mechanically or practically minded person i've ever met, so i'm sure if he can do it, anyone can. As others have said, get on YouTube and then practice at home - and i'm going to do the same!!

    To the OP - just a thought, but if you get a folding tyre to take with you for use in an emergency, when you've fitted that at the side of the road, what are you going to do with the GP4000 you've taken off?

    bin it.

    Think i'll just gamble. Must make sure to avoid the potholes on the descent of Leith Hill though. Not an easy task.

    What? You are going to 'bin' a £40 tyre, just because you got a flat?

    Well yeah, that was the plan. £40 won't get you much these days.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Well yeah, that was the plan. £40 won't get you much these days.

    Whatever. As the old saying goes, 'a fool and his money are soon parted'..
  • cattytowncattytown Posts: 647
    Where do you ride? I'll follow waiting for the puncture :-)
    Giant Defy 2
    Large bloke getting smaller :-)
  • dnwhite88dnwhite88 Posts: 285
    If he's listened to any of the advice on this thread he will be a pro at changing a tube by the weekend
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster"
  • cattytown wrote:
    Where do you ride? I'll follow waiting for the puncture :-)

    And I'll go on ahead with the tacks. :wink:
  • Slo Mo JonesSlo Mo Jones Posts: 272
    dnwhite88 wrote:
    If he's listened to any of the advice on this thread he will be a pro at changing a tube by the weekend

    Going to have a little practise tomorrow night.

    Now, does anyone know of any folding wheels that I can take with me in case I lose a spoke?
  • cattytowncattytown Posts: 647
    Now, does anyone know of any folding wheels that I can take with me in case I lose a spoke?

    If a spoke breaks, either remove it, and carry on carefully, or if you can't unthread it tape it to an adjacent spoke to stop it flapping about. A little tape can be carried wrapped around a pump body or CO2 bulb.

    Paul.
    Giant Defy 2
    Large bloke getting smaller :-)
  • Besides practising changing a tube, I'd invest in some Slime Tubes 8)

    I used to suffer with punctures but since I've put these on all my bikes they've all but disappeared. My Road bike had a puncture on a training ride and instantly healed itself, totally amazing in my mind.

    I've also bought a CO2 inflater which again if I need to change a tube I wont blow a coronary pumping the ruddy thing up in the middle of nowhere. :wink:
  • alihisgreatalihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    I fitted a Conti GP4000s yesterday

    Trick is to get your technique right -> put a tiny bit of air in the tube, and make sure its pushed up into the tyre and away from the beads.

    Then two tyre levers and a bit of effort and it goes on fine.
  • gozzygozzy Posts: 640
    scoobaru11 wrote:
    Besides practising changing a tube, I'd invest in some Slime Tubes 8)

    I used to suffer with punctures but since I've put these on all my bikes they've all but disappeared. My Road bike had a puncture on a training ride and instantly healed itself, totally amazing in my mind.

    I've also bought a CO2 inflater which again if I need to change a tube I wont blow a coronary pumping the ruddy thing up in the middle of nowhere. :wink:

    I had a slime tube once, punctured and it didn't heal.
    Be VERY careful putting them back on. Were you to say, pinch the tube with your tyre while refitting and cause it explode the tyre off the rim, you might end up with slime all over your kitchen.
  • Seems as though the problem is confined to fitting new tyres only. After being on the bike for a few days, I tried taking them off and refitting, and it was a doddle.
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