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Homemade sports drinks

mcowan77mcowan77 Posts: 560
edited September 2013 in Training, fitness and health
Any recipes for a homemade sports drink?

Cheers

Posts

  • mikeneticmikenetic Posts: 486
    mcowan77 wrote:
    Any recipes for a homemade sports drink?

    Cheers

    Ribena, pinch of salt (you really can't taste it, oddly). Ice.
  • bucklesbuckles Posts: 694
    1.
    Ingredients :Water
    Method: Add water to bottle. Drink
    25% off your first MyProtein order: sign up via https://www.myprotein.com/referrals.lis ... EE-R29Y&li or use my referral code LEE-R29Y
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    Orange squash or juice/ or whatever you like- this gives you the glucose.
    Water- to rehydrate.
    Small pinch of salt (can I re-iterate- small!!!- to replace the salts lost in sweating.
    Shake!

    Don't buy the sports drinks or use the rubbish gels- full of absolute censored . In a randomised blind study the above recipe equalled the results of the best isotonic/sports drinks.
  • BigFatBlokeBigFatBloke Posts: 167
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Orange squash or juice/ or whatever you like- this gives you the glucose.
    Water- to rehydrate.
    Small pinch of salt (can I re-iterate- small!!!- to replace the salts lost in sweating.
    Shake!

    Don't buy the sports drinks or use the rubbish gels- full of absolute censored . In a randomised blind study the above recipe equalled the results of the best isotonic/sports drinks.

    I approve of randomised blind studies, something the sports drink manufacturers seem to avoid. Can you post the study?
  • guityguity Posts: 113
    When I run out of my usual stuff I use high juice with 1 1/2 tbsp of glucose powder and a couple of pinches of salt per 500ml water. I don't feel quite as good later in long rides on this as with my usual stuff but certainly better than just water and fills short gaps in supply.
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Orange squash or juice/ or whatever you like- this gives you the glucose.
    Water- to rehydrate.
    Small pinch of salt (can I re-iterate- small!!!- to replace the salts lost in sweating.
    Shake!

    Don't buy the sports drinks or use the rubbish gels- full of absolute censored . In a randomised blind study the above recipe equalled the results of the best isotonic/sports drinks.

    I approve of randomised blind studies, something the sports drink manufacturers seem to avoid. Can you post the study?

    This is one of the available papers that looks at the stats regarding this- only problem is I can't seem to access it on t'internet to check if this is the one or not-

    The influence of a commercially available maltodextrin-fructose beverage on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, fluid delivery and cycling time-trial performance
    JD Roberts, MD Tarpey, LS Kass, RJ Tarpey- 2011

    I talked to Lindsay Kass who did the study- she was the one who pointed me in the direction of the equivalent stats on isotonic drinks and the above recipe- I think this is the paper or its cited in it to another paper of Lindsay's.
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    In regard to the study- I now remember- she used an Isotonic drink at the MD, and the recipe as the MD + Fructose- and as you can see the MD+F slightly improved performance overall compared to the MD.
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,220
    Link to article I think:
    http://www.jissn.com/content/9/1/5

    Edit - sorrry wrong one - this is about protein drinks
  • tuktuktuktuk Posts: 179
    Not so much a sports drink but i mix bcaa powder with my water for any rides other than commuting.
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    tuktuk wrote:
    Not so much a sports drink but i mix bcaa powder with my water for any rides other than commuting.
    What on earth for?
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • tuktuktuktuk Posts: 179
    Have a google, plenty info out there regarding the benefits of bcaa.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Most commercially available energy powders are 90%+ maltodextrin and a little flavouring. As far as I am aware (don't have a link to a study), maltodextrin can be absorbed by the body more efficiently and in greater amounts than glucose or simple sugars which you find in Ribena etc so is far better for long duration endurance events than simple sugar and salt in a bottle of water.

    BCAA in theory helps by providing your body access to Branched Chained Amino Acids which, over a long duration endurance event, your body will otherwise seek to gain access to by breaking down muscle tissue. Apparently there's nothing you can do to stop this, over long endurance events, the body starts to break down muscle and protein in the body to access amino acids and in particular, BCAA. BCAA are among the amino acids (like glutamine and taurine etc) which make up protein which in turn, your body turns into muscle when you eat meat or whatever. However studies are inconclusive as to whether our bodies can actually absorb BCAA through the intestine in pure form.

    Personally I buy plain maltodextrin and BCAA powder from My Protein. If I'm doing a shortish ride (up to around 50 miles) I just mix Malto with water and that's it. Sometimes a bit of fruit juice for flavouring. If it's a longer ride I stick a bit of BCAA in but BCAA on it's own is not a source of energy. Some people like to add fructose powder. Fructose is fruit sugar and is slower burning than simple sugar and malto and may give you a longer fuel base for long rides although I've never tried it.

    I used to add electrolyte salts to my drinks too but don't really do that anymore, you can add simple table salt but is basically just sodium chlorids and doesn't have the potassium, magnesium etc salts than a proper electrolyte salt powder will have.

    After a ride I sometimes mix a protein shake with some glutamine. Glutamine is very useful to the body in repairing damaged muscle fibres after you have worked the muscles hard... Again I buy pure protein powder and pure glutamine from My Protein, you really don't need these expensive commercially produced, heavily marketed recovery and energy drinks.

    Of course you should also take "real" food like bananas, malt loaf, flapjack or energy bars. I find that 60 or 70 miles into a ride without actually eating something solid and my stomach starts to rebel....
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • So homemade isotonic drink would be water, ribena, home sugar and pinch of salt?

    How about a recovery drink? Companies talk about replenishing those glycogen stores but what form of carbs would be most ideal immediately after exercise? I'm not big on spending huge on these brands
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    Most commercially available energy powders are 90%+ maltodextrin and a little flavouring. As far as I am aware (don't have a link to a study), maltodextrin can be absorbed by the body more efficiently and in greater amounts than glucose or simple sugars which you find in Ribena etc so is far better for long duration endurance events than simple sugar and salt in a bottle of water.

    BCAA in theory helps by providing your body access to Branched Chained Amino Acids which, over a long duration endurance event, your body will otherwise seek to gain access to by breaking down muscle tissue. Apparently there's nothing you can do to stop this, over long endurance events, the body starts to break down muscle and protein in the body to access amino acids and in particular, BCAA. BCAA are among the amino acids (like glutamine and taurine etc) which make up protein which in turn, your body turns into muscle when you eat meat or whatever. However studies are inconclusive as to whether our bodies can actually absorb BCAA through the intestine in pure form.

    Personally I buy plain maltodextrin and BCAA powder from My Protein. If I'm doing a shortish ride (up to around 50 miles) I just mix Malto with water and that's it. Sometimes a bit of fruit juice for flavouring. If it's a longer ride I stick a bit of BCAA in but BCAA on it's own is not a source of energy. Some people like to add fructose powder. Fructose is fruit sugar and is slower burning than simple sugar and malto and may give you a longer fuel base for long rides although I've never tried it.

    I used to add electrolyte salts to my drinks too but don't really do that anymore, you can add simple table salt but is basically just sodium chlorids and doesn't have the potassium, magnesium etc salts than a proper electrolyte salt powder will have.

    After a ride I sometimes mix a protein shake with some glutamine. Glutamine is very useful to the body in repairing damaged muscle fibres after you have worked the muscles hard... Again I buy pure protein powder and pure glutamine from My Protein, you really don't need these expensive commercially produced, heavily marketed recovery and energy drinks.

    Of course you should also take "real" food like bananas, malt loaf, flapjack or energy bars. I find that 60 or 70 miles into a ride without actually eating something solid and my stomach starts to rebel....

    Seriously rubbish!! You've been taken for a ride on the old magic roundabout of advertising and supplement company censored . If people could just look at eating healthily and sensibly without thinking there is a magic pill to aid their development you'd save a lot of money!

    Maltodextrin follows the same digestion pathway and absorption through utilisation pathway as glucose- the body does not care where it gets its sugars from- Wallis and Rowlands, 2005 'Oxidation of combined ingestion of maltodextrins and fructose during exercise.'

    Glutamine will do nothing for you at all- Rohde et al, 1998 Effect of glutamine supplementation on changes in the immune system induced by repeated exercise- determined that glutamine supplementation does not change the bodies response to muscle protein breakdown. Why would you want to do this anyway?? Muscles need to adapt after exercise- therefore they need to go through an inflammatory process to breakdown and then grow- by using glutamine to prevent this happening is counter productive and thankfully doesn't seem to work through ingestion of glutamine.

    BCCA also don't really do much as a supplement- Journal of Applied Physiology 1996 Effects of glucose, glucose plus branched-chain amino acids, or placebo on bike performance over 100 km Klavs Madsen, Dave A. Maclean, Bente Kiens, and Dirk Christensen.

    The best advice a nutritionist for elite athletes told me was- eat natural, eat fats like coconut oil, olive oil, and butter, get your calories from quality meat, fish and eggs and carbs from good grains and not overly refined, use fruit and veg for your minerals. This is a mantra that has seen humans do extra-human feats for millions of years- supplements have been here 20 years- research is poor, most of it shows no effect and yet normal amateur athletes use crazy supplements to try and gain the extra yard because they don't train hard enough.
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    So homemade isotonic drink would be water, ribena, home sugar and pinch of salt?

    How about a recovery drink? Companies talk about replenishing those glycogen stores but what form of carbs would be most ideal immediately after exercise? I'm not big on spending huge on these brands

    Don't spend huge on these brands- you don't need a recovery drink- unless you have a body fat percentage of less than 7% you'll be fine on plain water and a meal.
  • ju5t1nju5t1n Posts: 2,028
    You could make your own gels buy filling condoms with apricot jam :)
  • ju5t1n wrote:
    You could make your own gels buy filling condoms with apricot jam :)

    Used condoms?
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • team47bteam47b Posts: 6,424
    So homemade isotonic drink would be water, ribena, home sugar and pinch of salt?

    How about a recovery drink? Companies talk about replenishing those glycogen stores but what form of carbs would be most ideal immediately after exercise? I'm not big on spending huge on these brands

    Assuming you're not diabetic, drink chocolate milk for recovery drink. After exercise you need protein and carbs to a 4:1 ratio, which for me is a small wholemeal bread cheese sandwich within 30 minutes of completing exercise. Unless you have been flat out for an hour and a half your glycogen stores will be fine, just eat a normal meal.
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Most commercially available energy powders are 90%+ maltodextrin and a little flavouring. As far as I am aware (don't have a link to a study), maltodextrin can be absorbed by the body more efficiently and in greater amounts than glucose or simple sugars which you find in Ribena etc so is far better for long duration endurance events than simple sugar and salt in a bottle of water.

    BCAA in theory helps by providing your body access to Branched Chained Amino Acids which, over a long duration endurance event, your body will otherwise seek to gain access to by breaking down muscle tissue. Apparently there's nothing you can do to stop this, over long endurance events, the body starts to break down muscle and protein in the body to access amino acids and in particular, BCAA. BCAA are among the amino acids (like glutamine and taurine etc) which make up protein which in turn, your body turns into muscle when you eat meat or whatever. However studies are inconclusive as to whether our bodies can actually absorb BCAA through the intestine in pure form.

    Personally I buy plain maltodextrin and BCAA powder from My Protein. If I'm doing a shortish ride (up to around 50 miles) I just mix Malto with water and that's it. Sometimes a bit of fruit juice for flavouring. If it's a longer ride I stick a bit of BCAA in but BCAA on it's own is not a source of energy. Some people like to add fructose powder. Fructose is fruit sugar and is slower burning than simple sugar and malto and may give you a longer fuel base for long rides although I've never tried it.

    I used to add electrolyte salts to my drinks too but don't really do that anymore, you can add simple table salt but is basically just sodium chlorids and doesn't have the potassium, magnesium etc salts than a proper electrolyte salt powder will have.

    After a ride I sometimes mix a protein shake with some glutamine. Glutamine is very useful to the body in repairing damaged muscle fibres after you have worked the muscles hard... Again I buy pure protein powder and pure glutamine from My Protein, you really don't need these expensive commercially produced, heavily marketed recovery and energy drinks.

    Of course you should also take "real" food like bananas, malt loaf, flapjack or energy bars. I find that 60 or 70 miles into a ride without actually eating something solid and my stomach starts to rebel....

    Seriously rubbish!! You've been taken for a ride on the old magic roundabout of advertising and supplement company censored . If people could just look at eating healthily and sensibly without thinking there is a magic pill to aid their development you'd save a lot of money!

    Maltodextrin follows the same digestion pathway and absorption through utilisation pathway as glucose- the body does not care where it gets its sugars from- Wallis and Rowlands, 2005 'Oxidation of combined ingestion of maltodextrins and fructose during exercise.'

    Glutamine will do nothing for you at all- Rohde et al, 1998 Effect of glutamine supplementation on changes in the immune system induced by repeated exercise- determined that glutamine supplementation does not change the bodies response to muscle protein breakdown. Why would you want to do this anyway?? Muscles need to adapt after exercise- therefore they need to go through an inflammatory process to breakdown and then grow- by using glutamine to prevent this happening is counter productive and thankfully doesn't seem to work through ingestion of glutamine.

    BCCA also don't really do much as a supplement- Journal of Applied Physiology 1996 Effects of glucose, glucose plus branched-chain amino acids, or placebo on bike performance over 100 km Klavs Madsen, Dave A. Maclean, Bente Kiens, and Dirk Christensen.

    The best advice a nutritionist for elite athletes told me was- eat natural, eat fats like coconut oil, olive oil, and butter, get your calories from quality meat, fish and eggs and carbs from good grains and not overly refined, use fruit and veg for your minerals. This is a mantra that has seen humans do extra-human feats for millions of years- supplements have been here 20 years- research is poor, most of it shows no effect and yet normal amateur athletes use crazy supplements to try and gain the extra yard because they don't train hard enough.

    Do you actually have a clue what you're talking about?! Try doing a bit more research into glucose vs maltodextrin or complex carbohydrate and osmolality. Maltodextrin is widely recognised as being more easily absorbed per quantity of water than glucose. Maltodextrin is a complex carb/polysaccharide whereas glucose and sucrose are monosaccharides. There's a reason why commercially available energy drinks used by top amateur and pros have high quantities of malto in them and there's a reason why they don't drink water and Ribena when out on long endurance rides and races!

    You can cite a couple of studies you've just Googled off the top of your head as much a you like but the truth is that sports fuelling is slightly more complex than that. For every study that BCAA has no effect, there is another that says it is useful. As I said, BCAA is far from proven. As for glutamine it has been used for decades in recovery for athletes from cyclists to runners to weight and power lifters and is definitely useful to the body in repairing damaged muscle fibre and decreasing recovery time

    I'm not saying that you shouldn't eat properly whilst off the bike, it's what you consume ON the bike that counts over long distances and long races. Believe me I've been cycling long distances for years, I've tried cycling with just water and bananas, with water and Ribena/table sugar, water with commercially available energy powders and what I describe above, my own made up energy drinks and I know what works for me

    So you carry on glugging back the coconut oil with butter and fresh eggs whilst out on your bike, you clearly have little grasp or experience of the science involved!
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.

    And let's keep it real here- this is a forum for amateur athletes/weekend warriors- they have BMI of over 25, body fat % of over 15%, they have the perfect recovery system- body fat. They don't need a recovery drink on the bike, they need to maintain hydration(to stop death on a long,hot ride and to maintain concentration for cycling decisions etc) but their recovery will occur via the most efficient process known to man-metabolism of fat.
    Through utilising a recovery drink their goals of weightloss, performance enhancement are negated. The only people who require recovery foods are pro athletes with no body fat- and the majority of these post race/competition recovery foods come in the form of real food not supplements.
    Reason for this is because supplement companies can't guarantee that their supplements are not tainted by illegal substances in the factory- therefore ethical sports dieticians/scientists won't use them- this is coming from personal experience with working at EIS, UK athletics, football and boxing clubs.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.
    On one of the other threads you were a fully qualified musculoskeletal physiotherapist.... Now you've done Masters in Sports Dietetics too? Hmmm....

    Anyway, as I said a lot of sports nutrition is still highly comtroversial but:
    Glutamine:
    http://www.strengthandfitnessuk.com/glutamine
    "The consumption of oral glutamine has been shown to have a beneficial effect on immune function, and reduces the risk of infection following prolonged endurance exercise (Castell and Newsholme, 1997; Castell, 2003) and should be of benefit to athletes engaged in heavy exercise training (Antonio and Street, 1999)."

    "Most important to the athlete is glutamine's ability to increase the production of protein (muscle building) and decrease protein degradation (muscle breakdown). Glutamine helps to maintain the amino-acid balance in the body, thereby enabling a greater synthesis of protein and a possible decrease in symptoms of overtraining (Bompa et al., 2003)."

    Study on combinations of maltodextrin and fructose and their effect on race times:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22468766
    Study to show that combinations of carbs with differing rates of absorption ie maltodextrin and fructose on cycle race times vs single carb sources:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18369092

    Yes, a "sponsored" reference but makes some interesting points with references:
    http://www.torqfitness.co.uk/news/maltodextrinfructose

    BCAA:
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/lat ... jones.html
    http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/su ... mino-acids

    Anyway, you'd better get back to your coconut oil and eggs....
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • Tb2121 wrote:
    And let's keep it real here- this is a forum for amateur athletes/weekend warriors- they have BMI of over 25, body fat % of over 15%, .

    Can you give me any research to back up your claims?
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.

    And let's keep it real here- this is a forum for amateur athletes/weekend warriors- they have BMI of over 25, body fat % of over 15%, they have the perfect recovery system- body fat. They don't need a recovery drink on the bike, they need to maintain hydration(to stop death on a long,hot ride and to maintain concentration for cycling decisions etc) but their recovery will occur via the most efficient process known to man-metabolism of fat.
    Through utilising a recovery drink their goals of weightloss, performance enhancement are negated. The only people who require recovery foods are pro athletes with no body fat- and the majority of these post race/competition recovery foods come in the form of real food not supplements.
    Reason for this is because supplement companies can't guarantee that their supplements are not tainted by illegal substances in the factory- therefore ethical sports dieticians/scientists won't use them- this is coming from personal experience with working at EIS, UK athletics, football and boxing clubs.
    Plenty of people on this forum are highly skilled amateur athletes and certainly not fatties with a bmi of more than 25... I'm 6 ft 3 and weigh about 75 kg, not sure what my bmi is but it's not high! Plenty of other people I've meet from this forum are skinnier and fitter than me and race in the upper categories....
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • Tb2121Tb2121 Posts: 73
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.
    On one of the other threads you were a fully qualified musculoskeletal physiotherapist.... Now you've done Masters in Sports Dietetics too? Hmmm....

    Anyway, as I said a lot of sports nutrition is still highly comtroversial but:
    Glutamine:
    http://www.strengthandfitnessuk.com/glutamine
    "The consumption of oral glutamine has been shown to have a beneficial effect on immune function, and reduces the risk of infection following prolonged endurance exercise (Castell and Newsholme, 1997; Castell, 2003) and should be of benefit to athletes engaged in heavy exercise training (Antonio and Street, 1999)."

    "Most important to the athlete is glutamine's ability to increase the production of protein (muscle building) and decrease protein degradation (muscle breakdown). Glutamine helps to maintain the amino-acid balance in the body, thereby enabling a greater synthesis of protein and a possible decrease in symptoms of overtraining (Bompa et al., 2003)."

    Study on combinations of maltodextrin and fructose and their effect on race times:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22468766
    Study to show that combinations of carbs with differing rates of absorption ie maltodextrin and fructose on cycle race times vs single carb sources:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18369092

    Yes, a "sponsored" reference but makes some interesting points with references:
    http://www.torqfitness.co.uk/news/maltodextrinfructose

    BCAA:
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/lat ... jones.html
    http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/su ... mino-acids

    Anyway, you'd better get back to your coconut oil and eggs....


    Ye education is amazing isn't it- I'm a sports physio and have to know about how tissues adapt to diet and how to improve healing through diet- goes hand in hand. Your pseudo knowledge, gained from snippets of information offer no help to the amateur athletes on here. I get amateurs into my clinic daily asking about this supplement or that because they see the advertising- what they don't understand is that all pro athletes supplement minimally- and do the majority of it via diet- real food- I can't argue more than offering the insights of pro football, pro athletics and boxing- real athletes not supplemented up to the hilt.
    In regard to the comments about amateurs being 6ft 3 and 75 kg- good for you- but your still not pro- you still don't need supplements, you haven't got a fat % of 8, you don't cycle 150 miles/day for 20 days, you don't average 25mph, you don't use 6000 calories a day- then you could argue that you might need a protein shake, but the average rider on this forum doesn't.
    Every dietician I've spoken to- has always brought up the problems with supplementation in the public- because they read something about how BCAAs are good for you and they overload- whereas a simple adaption to their diet would do their body and wallet wonders- but each to their own.

    And I will now get back to my eggs and coconut oil- at least I know what I'm eating.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.
    On one of the other threads you were a fully qualified musculoskeletal physiotherapist.... Now you've done Masters in Sports Dietetics too? Hmmm....

    Anyway, as I said a lot of sports nutrition is still highly comtroversial but:
    Glutamine:
    http://www.strengthandfitnessuk.com/glutamine
    "The consumption of oral glutamine has been shown to have a beneficial effect on immune function, and reduces the risk of infection following prolonged endurance exercise (Castell and Newsholme, 1997; Castell, 2003) and should be of benefit to athletes engaged in heavy exercise training (Antonio and Street, 1999)."

    "Most important to the athlete is glutamine's ability to increase the production of protein (muscle building) and decrease protein degradation (muscle breakdown). Glutamine helps to maintain the amino-acid balance in the body, thereby enabling a greater synthesis of protein and a possible decrease in symptoms of overtraining (Bompa et al., 2003)."

    Study on combinations of maltodextrin and fructose and their effect on race times:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22468766
    Study to show that combinations of carbs with differing rates of absorption ie maltodextrin and fructose on cycle race times vs single carb sources:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18369092

    Yes, a "sponsored" reference but makes some interesting points with references:
    http://www.torqfitness.co.uk/news/maltodextrinfructose

    BCAA:
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/lat ... jones.html
    http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/su ... mino-acids

    Anyway, you'd better get back to your coconut oil and eggs....


    Ye education is amazing isn't it- I'm a sports physio and have to know about how tissues adapt to diet and how to improve healing through diet- goes hand in hand. Your pseudo knowledge, gained from snippets of information offer no help to the amateur athletes on here. I get amateurs into my clinic daily asking about this supplement or that because they see the advertising- what they don't understand is that all pro athletes supplement minimally- and do the majority of it via diet- real food- I can't argue more than offering the insights of pro football, pro athletics and boxing- real athletes not supplemented up to the hilt.
    In regard to the comments about amateurs being 6ft 3 and 75 kg- good for you- but your still not pro- you still don't need supplements, you haven't got a fat % of 8, you don't cycle 150 miles/day for 20 days, you don't average 25mph, you don't use 6000 calories a day- then you could argue that you might need a protein shake, but the average rider on this forum doesn't.
    Every dietician I've spoken to- has always brought up the problems with supplementation in the public- because they read something about how BCAAs are good for you and they overload- whereas a simple adaption to their diet would do their body and wallet wonders- but each to their own.

    And I will now get back to my eggs and coconut oil- at least I know what I'm eating.

    Well I'll stick to my "pseudo" knowledge, built up through years of experience riding my bike. AsI mentioned I my 1 st post, I've ridden with just water and banana, water and sugar or ribena and water with malto and other supplements and I know what works for me and most club riders over a 75 mile +, 19-21mph club ride. On a long ride without an energy drink, I generally bonk and have to stop for chocolate or something, with it I can go forever without stopping. Of course what you eat off the bike is important but you clearly have little clue about what is needed for keen, relatively fast amateur riders on the race scene
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • Tb2121 wrote:
    And let's keep it real here- this is a forum for amateur athletes/weekend warriors- they have BMI of over 25, body fat % of over 15%, .

    Can you give me any research to back up your claims?

    It's probably a reasonable guess :wink:
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.
    On one of the other threads you were a fully qualified musculoskeletal physiotherapist.... Now you've done Masters in Sports Dietetics too? Hmmm....

    Anyway, as I said a lot of sports nutrition is still highly comtroversial but:
    Glutamine:
    http://www.strengthandfitnessuk.com/glutamine
    "The consumption of oral glutamine has been shown to have a beneficial effect on immune function, and reduces the risk of infection following prolonged endurance exercise (Castell and Newsholme, 1997; Castell, 2003) and should be of benefit to athletes engaged in heavy exercise training (Antonio and Street, 1999)."

    "Most important to the athlete is glutamine's ability to increase the production of protein (muscle building) and decrease protein degradation (muscle breakdown). Glutamine helps to maintain the amino-acid balance in the body, thereby enabling a greater synthesis of protein and a possible decrease in symptoms of overtraining (Bompa et al., 2003)."

    Study on combinations of maltodextrin and fructose and their effect on race times:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22468766
    Study to show that combinations of carbs with differing rates of absorption ie maltodextrin and fructose on cycle race times vs single carb sources:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18369092

    Yes, a "sponsored" reference but makes some interesting points with references:
    http://www.torqfitness.co.uk/news/maltodextrinfructose

    BCAA:
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/lat ... jones.html
    http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/su ... mino-acids

    Anyway, you'd better get back to your coconut oil and eggs....


    Ye education is amazing isn't it- I'm a sports physio and have to know about how tissues adapt to diet and how to improve healing through diet- goes hand in hand. Your pseudo knowledge, gained from snippets of information offer no help to the amateur athletes on here. I get amateurs into my clinic daily asking about this supplement or that because they see the advertising- what they don't understand is that all pro athletes supplement minimally- and do the majority of it via diet- real food- I can't argue more than offering the insights of pro football, pro athletics and boxing- real athletes not supplemented up to the hilt.
    In regard to the comments about amateurs being 6ft 3 and 75 kg- good for you- but your still not pro- you still don't need supplements, you haven't got a fat % of 8, you don't cycle 150 miles/day for 20 days, you don't average
    25mph, you don't use 6000 calories a day- then you could argue that you might need a protein shake, but the average rider on this forum doesn't.
    Every dietician I've spoken to- has always brought up the problems with supplementation in the public- because they read something about how BCAAs are good for you and they overload- whereas a simple adaption to their diet would do their body and wallet wonders- but each to their own.

    And I will now get back to my eggs and coconut oil- at least I know what I'm eating.
    ...I'd also be quite interested in the evidence to show that I, with my physiology and cycling/running habits do not need any kind of supplement/glycogen replacement during a ride whereas a pro/tdf rider does. Where's the evidence that a keen amateur racer or for that matter a "weekend warrior" doing a100 mile sportive does not need anything more than ribena and salt in a bottle and eggs and coconut oil (!!)? You indicate it's something to do with body fat percentage -evidence? what's the cut off? Please quote some kind of scientific evidence to support these assertions.thanks
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Tb2121 wrote:
    Can you give me any research to back up you claims? Because to be honest all I hear is you use these and it works for you- not very scientific and in regard to taking the top google findings- I've studied sports dietetics at MSC level- how about you.
    In regard to glutamine- keeping wasting your money on it- even high dose glutamine has been shown to do nothing in healthy weightlifters- but it seems you don't like good solid research.
    On one of the other threads you were a fully qualified musculoskeletal physiotherapist.... Now you've done Masters in Sports Dietetics too? Hmmm....

    Anyway, as I said a lot of sports nutrition is still highly comtroversial but:
    Glutamine:
    http://www.strengthandfitnessuk.com/glutamine
    "The consumption of oral glutamine has been shown to have a beneficial effect on immune function, and reduces the risk of infection following prolonged endurance exercise (Castell and Newsholme, 1997; Castell, 2003) and should be of benefit to athletes engaged in heavy exercise training (Antonio and Street, 1999)."

    "Most important to the athlete is glutamine's ability to increase the production of protein (muscle building) and decrease protein degradation (muscle breakdown). Glutamine helps to maintain the amino-acid balance in the body, thereby enabling a greater synthesis of protein and a possible decrease in symptoms of overtraining (Bompa et al., 2003)."

    Study on combinations of maltodextrin and fructose and their effect on race times:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22468766
    Study to show that combinations of carbs with differing rates of absorption ie maltodextrin and fructose on cycle race times vs single carb sources:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18369092

    Yes, a "sponsored" reference but makes some interesting points with references:
    http://www.torqfitness.co.uk/news/maltodextrinfructose

    BCAA:
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/lat ... jones.html
    http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/su ... mino-acids

    Anyway, you'd better get back to your coconut oil and eggs....


    Ye education is amazing isn't it- I'm a sports physio and have to know about how tissues adapt to diet and how to improve healing through diet- goes hand in hand. Your pseudo knowledge, gained from snippets of information offer no help to the amateur athletes on here. I get amateurs into my clinic daily asking about this supplement or that because they see the advertising- what they don't understand is that all pro athletes supplement minimally- and do the majority of it via diet- real food- I can't argue more than offering the insights of pro football, pro athletics and boxing- real athletes not supplemented up to the hilt.
    In regard to the comments about amateurs being 6ft 3 and 75 kg- good for you- but your still not pro- you still don't need supplements, you haven't got a fat % of 8, you don't cycle 150 miles/day for 20 days, you don't average
    25mph, you don't use 6000 calories a day- then you could argue that you might need a protein shake, but the average rider on this forum doesn't.
    Every dietician I've spoken to- has always brought up the problems with supplementation in the public- because they read something about how BCAAs are good for you and they overload- whereas a simple adaption to their diet would do their body and wallet wonders- but each to their own.

    And I will now get back to my eggs and coconut oil- at least I know what I'm eating.
    ...I'd also be quite interested in the evidence to show that I, with my physiology and cycling/running habits do not need any kind of supplement/glycogen replacement during a ride whereas a pro/tdf rider does. Where's the evidence that a keen amateur racer or for that matter a "weekend warrior" doing a100 mile sportive does not need anything more than ribena and salt in a bottle and eggs and coconut oil (!!)? You indicate it's something to do with body fat percentage -evidence? what's the cut off? Please quote some kind of scientific evidence to support these assertions.thanks
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • velogeevelogee Posts: 133
    Anyone fancy a pint?
    Madone 4.9 2014
    Jeffsy 27.5 2018
  • velogee wrote:
    Anyone fancy a pint?

    A pint of what? Will it help my recovery times or not? :lol:
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