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Question about handle bars

stevetaylor20stevetaylor20 Posts: 22
edited June 2013 in Road buying advice
I am fairly new to getting into cycling but I like it. I cycle to work every day on a specialized sirrus comp that has straight handle bars. The bike does seem pretty good and light. I want to get into road cycling events like london to oxford etc and also much tougher events. So my question is based upon that info is that I NEED (and prefer) this bike's straight handle bars for cycling through london right, and purely for space reasons i'd prefer NOT to buy a second bike, so would you:

a) Deem this bike I have acceptable for tough events on the road and buy some drop down handle bars, assuming these events require drop down handles bars, and in that case do nothing...

b) Sell this bike and..?!

Thanks!

Posts

  • 16mm16mm Posts: 545
    It's not as simple as just changing the handlebars. The top tube length is usually longer on flat bar bikes.

    Plus you'd need new shifters.

    But you don't need drop bars.
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    if you need and prefer flat handle bars why are you looking to get drop bars?

    but ignoring all that.... I dont think it would be an easy (or cost effective) exercise to swap flat bars for drops, you'd need new shifters and depending on your front and rear mech compatibility possibly them as well. Also if the bike isnt set up for drops the handling would be effected.

    if you want to get drops i'd sell your bike and buy a new one (well i'd keep the old one and buy a new one!)
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • passoutpassout Posts: 4,425
    Chris Bass wrote:
    if you need and prefer flat handle bars why are you looking to get drop bars?

    but ignoring all that.... I dont think it would be an easy (or cost effective) exercise to swap flat bars for drops, you'd need new shifters and depending on your front and rear mech compatibility possibly them as well. Also if the bike isnt set up for drops the handling would be effected.

    if you want to get drops i'd sell your bike and buy a new one (well i'd keep the old one and buy a new one!)

    Yes swapping over would be expensive and a pain.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • As long as you've got some decent ergo bar ends (like the Cane Creek ones, or the cheaper Giant ergo ones) then there's no real reason to switch to drops. They'll give you more hand positions than a flat bar set up if your doing long distances. I did the Etape Caledonia and a 100k sportive about 4 years ago on a flat bar road bike with ergo bar ends as that was my only bike at the time.

    If your using it mainly for commuting then I'd stick with the flat bars. I've now got four bikes - the original straight bar road bike, a drop bar bike, a fixed gear (my main commuter) and an MTB. If I fancy a change from the fixed gear bike then it's usually the straight bar that gets used for the commute as the riding position and controls are far better suited for the city.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    I find drop usefl and wold never se flat bars on the road. I use flat bars on my MTB but on the road my postion allows me to stay on the drop for as long as like which is useful when pedalling into a head wind. Tucking in save valble Joules I can't do that on flat bars.

    So if you want to experiment with drop buy a road bike with drops. Maybe it's me but I have never nderstood the need for flat bars on a road bike as so long as the frame is the right size, stem the right length and bars have the right reach, drop and width then drop bars work well. I think it is pretty easy to size up these components but then again I run a shop so I have had plenty of practice.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • 16mm16mm Posts: 545
    I find drop usefl and wold never se flat bars on the road. I use flat bars on my MTB but on the road my postion allows me to stay on the drop for as long as like which is useful when pedalling into a head wind. Tucking in save valble Joules I can't do that on flat bars.

    So if you want to experiment with drop buy a road bike with drops. Maybe it's me but I have never nderstood the need for flat bars on a road bike as so long as the frame is the right size, stem the right length and bars have the right reach, drop and width then drop bars work well. I think it is pretty easy to size up these components but then again I run a shop so I have had plenty of practice.

    I think the OP is talking about the better / higher position a flat bar give you in a city. It would be unusual for a road bike to have the tops this high, maybe on a tourer?
    I've about a 10cm drop on my road bike.
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