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Sportive Nutrition - Before, during & after

N1ckCN1ckC Posts: 10
I am entering a number of sportives this year, from my first, a 50 miler this coming Sunday 5th May to the main event, the PruLondon100 in August. I average around 16-18mph but can do double this on flat as I have good leg power. Hills are not so good!
My training & fitness is going well & this weekends 50 should be dispensed without too much issue, the one problem I am yet to resolve is getting food/energy/fluids intake correct before & during the rides.

Any advice therefore from riders out there on good pre & during food intakes, any energy bars, all that kind of thing is appreciated. I hate bananas so that rules them out before anyone suggests them & I have until now been using the SiS tablets to add to water to give me sugars/sodium etc & to keep the electrolyte levels balanced.

Thanks & happy riding...

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,051
    In reality, just eat anything you like the taste of - it doesn't need to be any more complex than that. If you have been 'in training' for a while then you will presumably already kow what works and what doesn't, but there is certainly no 'magic potion' in terms of food recommendations. Well done on being able to average 36mph on the flat, by the way...
  • phreakphreak Posts: 2,180
    If you do 18mph average then you'll be done in under 3 hours. I don't usually take any food with me for such a short ride. Decent sized breakfast beforehand and some squash in my bottles is usually plenty.
  • schlepcyclingschlepcycling Posts: 1,578
    If you can average 32-36mph on the flat then you shouldn't be bothering with sportives you should be giving Dave Brailsford a call. :wink:
    'Hello to Jason Isaacs'
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    If you can average 32-36mph on the flat then you shouldn't be bothering with sportives you should be giving Dave Brailsford a call. :wink:
    I can average 32-36mph on the flat, but only for about 1 minute
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • joe.90joe.90 Posts: 171
    phreak wrote:
    If you do 18mph average then you'll be done in under 3 hours. I don't usually take any food with me for such a short ride. Decent sized breakfast beforehand and some squash in my bottles is usually plenty.

    bad advice..i would recommend eating something ever half hour to hour with everything 3 + hours long.
  • SetarkosSetarkos Posts: 239
    Herbsman wrote:
    I can average 32-36mph on the flat, but only for about 1 minute

    36mph for a minute is quite impressive! :)
    At sea level, no wind, 0% gradient that's well above 700W (and that's already assuming a decent TT position)
  • phreakphreak Posts: 2,180
    joe.90 wrote:
    phreak wrote:
    If you do 18mph average then you'll be done in under 3 hours. I don't usually take any food with me for such a short ride. Decent sized breakfast beforehand and some squash in my bottles is usually plenty.

    bad advice..i would recommend eating something ever half hour to hour with everything 3 + hours long.

    Bad advice for you maybe. I've done lots of 3-4 hour rides this winter and not eaten on the way round. I didn't explode :) Those are solo rides as well. Dare say if I'd been in a group I'd have used even less energy.

    Managed a 5 hour ride on Sunday with half a dozen fig rolls if that helps.
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    Setarkos wrote:
    Herbsman wrote:
    I can average 32-36mph on the flat, but only for about 1 minute

    36mph for a minute is quite impressive! :)
    At sea level, no wind, 0% gradient that's well above 700W (and that's already assuming a decent TT position)
    I said 32-36! My best for 1 minute is about 650w, that was at the end of a hard ride, speed was approx 33mph with a bit of a headwind. So could probably average 36 on a good day on the same stretch with no headwind or a wee tailwind
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • Zoomer37Zoomer37 Posts: 725
    Herbsman wrote:
    Setarkos wrote:
    Herbsman wrote:
    I can average 32-36mph on the flat, but only for about 1 minute

    36mph for a minute is quite impressive! :)
    At sea level, no wind, 0% gradient that's well above 700W (and that's already assuming a decent TT position)
    I said 32-36! My best for 1 minute is about 650w, that was at the end of a hard ride, speed was approx 33mph with a bit of a headwind. So could probably average 36 on a good day on the same stretch with no headwind or a wee tailwind

    I reckon you could probably take it to 38mph for 1 min mate if those ''I'm totally awesome'' decals don't start peeling off and cause a bit of drag
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    ok ok im only stating facts

    I don't actually think I'm awesome, my power output is pretty censored compared to most people I ride with
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • simonheadsimonhead Posts: 1,399
    Do what feels right, if its crappy weather and you are feeling a bit miserable a handful of chocolate covered raisins are great for your mood.

    I am doing the london 100 and up to 60 mile rides averaging about 16 mph, always have some peices of flapjack if i am on a longer ride and use the High 5 zero tabs or energy source powder if i want a lift.
    Life isnt like a box of chocolates, its like a bag of pic n mix.
  • joe.90joe.90 Posts: 171
    phreak wrote:
    joe.90 wrote:
    phreak wrote:
    If you do 18mph average then you'll be done in under 3 hours. I don't usually take any food with me for such a short ride. Decent sized breakfast beforehand and some squash in my bottles is usually plenty.

    bad advice..i would recommend eating something ever half hour to hour with everything 3 + hours long.

    Bad advice for you maybe. I've done lots of 3-4 hour rides this winter and not eaten on the way round. I didn't explode :) Those are solo rides as well. Dare say if I'd been in a group I'd have used even less energy.

    Managed a 5 hour ride on Sunday with half a dozen fig rolls if that helps.

    That's crazy. I would die, and have done in the past by not eating enough...! Everyone's different I suppose. but the general rule is to eat often on long rides.
  • joe.90 wrote:
    That's crazy. I would die, and have done in the past by not eating enough...!

    Amazing recovery.
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,051
    Good thread - so far, we have one poster who can average 36mph - and another one who is immortal ;)
  • joe.90joe.90 Posts: 171
    Imposter wrote:
    Good thread - so far, we have one poster who can average 36mph - and another one who is immortal ;)

    Ha ha...you know what I mean!
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Before: massive bowl of porridge
    During: fig roll and a few jelly babies every 40 mins or so. Wash down with a slurp of drink.
    After: Pint of sweet tea and a couple of Hobnobs, then return to normal eating habits.
  • SBezzaSBezza Posts: 2,173
    phreak wrote:
    joe.90 wrote:
    phreak wrote:
    If you do 18mph average then you'll be done in under 3 hours. I don't usually take any food with me for such a short ride. Decent sized breakfast beforehand and some squash in my bottles is usually plenty.

    bad advice..i would recommend eating something ever half hour to hour with everything 3 + hours long.

    Bad advice for you maybe. I've done lots of 3-4 hour rides this winter and not eaten on the way round. I didn't explode :) Those are solo rides as well. Dare say if I'd been in a group I'd have used even less energy.

    Managed a 5 hour ride on Sunday with half a dozen fig rolls if that helps.

    Same here, nothing amazing about doing a 3-4 hour ride without food if you have eaten decently before the ride. Get the body used to using a nice stored energy source (FAT), and you have plenty of stored energy. I do plenty of 50 mile after work rides without eating.
  • SBezzaSBezza Posts: 2,173
    Setarkos wrote:
    Herbsman wrote:
    I can average 32-36mph on the flat, but only for about 1 minute

    36mph for a minute is quite impressive! :)
    At sea level, no wind, 0% gradient that's well above 700W (and that's already assuming a decent TT position)

    Well so much for calculations, I can manage 36 mph whilst TTing with a lot less power than 700 watts :wink: I would suggest the TT position is of someone shaped like a brick.
  • I think this a bad advice for you maybe. I've done lots of 3-4 hour rides this winter and not eaten on the way round. I didn't explode and those are solo rides as well.
  • bucklesbuckles Posts: 694
    I think this a bad advice for you maybe. I've done lots of 3-4 hour rides this winter and not eaten on the way round. I didn't explode and those are solo rides as well.

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  • literliter Posts: 58
    Today I did two fairly hilly road races, in the morning 77km with 1100m climbing, in the afternoon 82km with 770m climbing.

    Each race took just over two hours, I didn't have breakfast nor eat during the races but I drank 500ml of sugar water in each race. In between the races I ate a 100g packet of Haribo and 600ml of plain water. (The second race was a last minute decision so I hadn't brought any lunch with me).

    I am not recommending this approach, although it seems to work for me, but just making the point that it is possible to go quite far on a small number of calories, once you get used to it.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,051
    liter wrote:
    Today I did two fairly hilly road races, in the morning 77km with 1100m climbing, in the afternoon 82km with 770m climbing.

    Each race took just over two hours, I didn't have breakfast nor eat during the races but I drank 500ml of sugar water in each race. In between the races I ate a 100g packet of Haribo and 600ml of plain water. (The second race was a last minute decision so I hadn't brought any lunch with me).

    I am not recommending this approach, although it seems to work for me, but just making the point that it is possible to go quite far on a small number of calories, once you get used to it.

    Doing that is eminently possible - but if you're racing it's the results that matter. You didn't mention where you finished.
  • literliter Posts: 58
    Imposter wrote:
    liter wrote:
    Today I did two fairly hilly road races, in the morning 77km with 1100m climbing, in the afternoon 82km with 770m climbing.

    Each race took just over two hours, I didn't have breakfast nor eat during the races but I drank 500ml of sugar water in each race. In between the races I ate a 100g packet of Haribo and 600ml of plain water. (The second race was a last minute decision so I hadn't brought any lunch with me).

    I am not recommending this approach, although it seems to work for me, but just making the point that it is possible to go quite far on a small number of calories, once you get used to it.

    Doing that is eminently possible - but if you're racing it's the results that matter. You didn't mention where you finished.

    It's a good point, I didn't win either race. I do win occasionly though. The real question is whether my performance would be better or worse if I ate more; impossible to say. I have tried taking food in my pockets but I never get round to touching it.

    To answer the OP's question I would recommend taking some food in your pockets and eating it if and when you feel hungry. In your bottles: mix 35g of sugar or honey and a pinch of salt per 500ml water.
  • SBezzaSBezza Posts: 2,173
    liter wrote:
    Today I did two fairly hilly road races, in the morning 77km with 1100m climbing, in the afternoon 82km with 770m climbing.

    Each race took just over two hours, I didn't have breakfast nor eat during the races but I drank 500ml of sugar water in each race. In between the races I ate a 100g packet of Haribo and 600ml of plain water. (The second race was a last minute decision so I hadn't brought any lunch with me).

    I am not recommending this approach, although it seems to work for me, but just making the point that it is possible to go quite far on a small number of calories, once you get used to it.

    I am glad you are not recommending it, it is pure folly to think about racing without fuelling properly. Training can be done without special foods, but racing is another matter. Why you didn't have a breakfast in the morning God only knows, but why start a race in a glycogen depleted state unless you just wanted to get round rather than actually contest the race :wink: Fuel up properly and you might get better results (though to be honest you might have won one of the races :D )
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