hi, help and advice please

BigTK
BigTK Posts: 47
edited March 2013 in Road beginners
hello there,
total newbie here, from Lancashire! just bought a Giant tfr compoiste 3, 2013 bike.
just wanted you experts on here to tell me what to upgrade, or change. at the moment ive put the following pedals on them for the time being,SHIMANO Deore XT M770 Clipless Pedal, and in the future will get proper road bike ones. and put these on my Scott aspect 45.
now then, i have a few confessions to make, firstly I havent rode a bike in ages, but really wanted to, because i weighed 150 KG, i couldnt, even ride my mountain bike, heck even walking was too hard!!!!! but now, one year on, i'm at 100kg, 220 pounds.and still dieting and jogging, so i'm still coming down!! :D
this being said, i dont know how i'm going to start a good riding routine. i have no idea! but, i know of a pretty simple 15 mile route. which i have done on my MTB. probly do that for starters.

second confession. i'm really shy to wear a helmet! yeah! a life saving Helmet! as a HGV driver, i should know better. but no one in my community rides bikes, let alone wear helmets!!!!! so to get my confidence up, i'll be doing a few bike rides this week and the next at very quite hours, probly at 10/11 pm. or 6 am. at the momment without helmet,but i'm really hoping to buy one for day time rides. just dont have the confidence to wear one at the moment.

so then. can you tell advise me about my bike, and everything else too.
i've bought padded shorts. but will be wearing them under to close fitting 3/4
all comments appreciated. thanks
«1

Comments

  • ooermissus
    ooermissus Posts: 811
    I wouldn't change anything. Just enjoy the bike. Maybe make sure you can change a tube - and carry a spare and a pump - but really just have fun. :)

    (And if you're not comfortable in a helmet yet - IMO still better to ride without one and get fit. Maybe you'll change your mind once you get a bit more confident.)

    BTW you might find a site like this useful for planning new routes around your home: http://www.mappedometer.com/
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    ooermissus wrote:
    I wouldn't change anything. Just enjoy the bike. Maybe make sure you can change a tube - and carry a spare and a pump - but really just have fun. :)

    (And if you're not comfortable in a helmet yet - IMO still better to ride without one and get fit. Maybe you'll change your mind once you get a bit more confident.)

    BTW you might find a site like this useful for planning new routes around your home: http://www.mappedometer.com/
    thank you very much. i have a topeak saddle bag on my scott MTB and afully loaded alien tool.which i'll l put it on this one. i've got 2 spare tyres for this new bike, plus a really nice pump, cant tell you what it is yet, as i have still not recieved my bike,theyre also putting on a bottle frame and front light. delievery from the shop will be on thurday, all built of course. its a shame really, i would have rode it home today but i dont want to fall off because of the new pedal, shoes, and the whole thin tyres bit. plus lack of confidence too! :?
  • SoSimple
    SoSimple Posts: 301
    Bite the bullet and wear the helmet mate. You won't have the chance to feel self conscious as they load you into the ambulance!

    You can find plenty that don't look like mushrooms and once the weather eventually improves you'll see plenty of other cyclists looking very similar.

    If you've lost that much weight you shouldn't really give a flying f@ck what anyone thinks!

    Get out, be yourself and enjoy it!
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    Well done on the weight loss, fantastic effort!

    Just get on yer bike, don't worry about those not bright enough to get into cycling, by all means feel sorry for them for missing out.

    Gaining confidence doesn't take very long, by about the third ride you will not care about anything other than getting out on the bike. :D
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • Gizmodo
    Gizmodo Posts: 1,928
    Your comfort on the bike is important for you to enjoy it, "bike fitting" makes a big difference to how far/fast/efficiently you can ride. The most important factors are your saddle height, saddle forward/backward adjustment, your cleat setup on your shoes and your handlebar position.

    To correctly fit your bike you should ideally have a turbo trainer and a friend to help, although you can get away without the turbo. Hopefully if you bought the bike from a good bike shop, they will spend an hour or so with you setting it up to fit you. If you bought it mail order then you should do the fitting yourself.

    This YouTube video will help http://youtu.be/FAl_5e7bIHk
  • Focus-rider
    Focus-rider Posts: 126
    Just though I would chip in on this as I dont normally post to much on here. Just thought I would say well done on the weight loss, thats a cracking effort and I bet you feel 100 times better for it. keep it up. As for the lid, they will grow on you. The more you ride your bike the more you will get into the road bike culture, I was quite paranoid about all the lycra and helmets at first but now i wouldnt dream of going out without it on but thats just my personal preference. I have had a few minor falls before at around 15 - 20 mph and thumped my head each time, my lid took all the brunt of it each time so thats my decision made. As people have said already, who gives a toss what other people think of you, its your life so enjoy it. If people do laugh or joke you will have gone past them in under 5 seconds and you will never have to see them again. In my opinion the benefits out way the occasionl snigger. Saying that I have never had anyone say anything to me or pass judgement. My life my rules. :D keep it up.
  • MisterMuncher
    MisterMuncher Posts: 1,302
    You can't see the helmet when you're riding.
  • goonz
    goonz Posts: 3,106
    Firstly welcome and congrats on the weight loss, thats a mighty feat. :)

    As another cyclist I often look at what gear other cyclists are wearing, not to judge but to see whether there are any bits I can gain ideas from or anything I may be missing. Personally I have ridden with and without a helmet, and I feel MUCH MUCH safer with it, and more comfortable. I wear a cap under mine which may help?

    I went through loads of helmets as I was quite *fashion conscious* too and I eventually settled with the one I currently have. Get into your lbs and take a look at the helmets and try loads on until you find one that fits as you like it. White is always a good safe colour and will go with anything.

    Personally safety comes way before any vanity issues I may have. You mention your community, I am of Indian origin and no one in community rides a bike let alone decks out fully in lycra and trims their leg hairs. Last time my mates saw me in it they nearly crashed their car! So I wouldnt worry about what others will say, just get out there and churn away! Trust me there is no feeling better than it!
    Scott Speedster S20 Roadie for Speed
    Specialized Hardrock MTB for Lumps
    Specialized Langster SS for Ease
    Cinelli Mash Bolt Fixed for Pain
    n+1 is well and truly on track
    Strava http://app.strava.com/athletes/1608875
  • chrisaonabike
    chrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
    team47b wrote:
    Well done on the weight loss, fantastic effort!
    +1. Very well done indeed.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • goonz
    goonz Posts: 3,106
    goonz wrote:
    As another cyclist I often look at what gear other cyclists are wearing, not to judge but to see whether there are any bits I can gain ideas from or anything I may be missing.

    I think my point that I didnt even make was if you do see other cyclists look at you as you cycle past dont automatically think they are judging or having a laugh at you.
    Scott Speedster S20 Roadie for Speed
    Specialized Hardrock MTB for Lumps
    Specialized Langster SS for Ease
    Cinelli Mash Bolt Fixed for Pain
    n+1 is well and truly on track
    Strava http://app.strava.com/athletes/1608875
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    SoSimple wrote:
    Bite the bullet and wear the helmet mate. You won't have the chance to feel self conscious as they load you into the ambulance!

    You can find plenty that don't look like mushrooms and once the weather eventually improves you'll see plenty of other cyclists looking very similar.

    If you've lost that much weight you shouldn't really give a flying f@ck what anyone thinks!

    Get out, be yourself and enjoy it!

    Your absolutely right!. Will be going to the shop today as I'm going to be taught how to clip in and out, so I'll see what simple but good fitting helmet is available.
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    edited March 2013
    team47b wrote:
    Well done on the weight loss, fantastic effort!

    Just get on yer bike, don't worry about those not bright enough to get into cycling, by all means feel sorry for them for missing out.

    Gaining confidence doesn't take very long, by about the third ride you will not care about anything other than getting out on the bike. :D
    Thank you. I hope gain my confidence on my 3rd ride. Very optimistic of you. I really hope it happens. Looked outside, its wet and lightly snowing! Dont know what to do if its like this tomorrow, shall I go out, or just stay in starring at the dam bike untill the roads get drier?
    I'm considering purchasing a kurt kenetic road bike trainer, priced at 296 on amazon. But still not content with riding the bike at home, want to really take it out.
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    Gizmodo wrote:
    Your comfort on the bike is important for you to enjoy it, "bike fitting" makes a big difference to how far/fast/efficiently you can ride. The most important factors are your saddle height, saddle forward/backward adjustment, your cleat setup on your shoes and your handlebar position.

    To correctly fit your bike you should ideally have a turbo trainer and a friend to help, although you can get away without the turbo. Hopefully if you bought the bike from a good bike shop, they will spend an hour or so with you setting it up to fit you. If you bought it mail order then you should do the fitting yourself.

    This YouTube video will help http://youtu.be/FAl_5e7bIHk
    Thanks Gizmodo, I've been fully and thoruoughly fitted at the bike shop. I'm getting A GIANT medium. 2 inch clerance from the crotch, leg 99% straight when fully stretched when sitting on saddle, arms 95% bent at elbows, theyre not locked. When on the saddle, I'm tiptoeing, when not riding.
    Got shoes fitted size 46. Plus tried my padded shorts on before I payed for them.
    does this sound ok?
  • goonz
    goonz Posts: 3,106
    BigTK wrote:
    Gizmodo wrote:
    Your comfort on the bike is important for you to enjoy it, "bike fitting" makes a big difference to how far/fast/efficiently you can ride. The most important factors are your saddle height, saddle forward/backward adjustment, your cleat setup on your shoes and your handlebar position.

    To correctly fit your bike you should ideally have a turbo trainer and a friend to help, although you can get away without the turbo. Hopefully if you bought the bike from a good bike shop, they will spend an hour or so with you setting it up to fit you. If you bought it mail order then you should do the fitting yourself.

    This YouTube video will help http://youtu.be/FAl_5e7bIHk
    Thanks Gizmodo, I've been fully and thoruoughly fitted at the bike shop. I'm getting A GIANT medium. 2 inch clerance from the crotch, leg 99% straight when fully stretched when sitting on saddle, arms 95% bent at elbows, theyre not locked. When on the saddle, I'm tiptoeing, when not riding. So does this sound ok?

    It sounds ok, but you will really only find out when you get on the bike and ride for a few hours, dont let initial sores put you off, this may be you simply getting used to the new position. If you get knee pain then you need to reconsider your position but back and shoulder pain and other aches will just be your body getting used to the lower position.

    You can get turbos for less than that and it might be a worthy investment if you are serious about your training then any break will make you feel pretty annoyed so having a turbo might be a good way to get those miles in whislt staying dry and warm. Look at Tacx models.
    Scott Speedster S20 Roadie for Speed
    Specialized Hardrock MTB for Lumps
    Specialized Langster SS for Ease
    Cinelli Mash Bolt Fixed for Pain
    n+1 is well and truly on track
    Strava http://app.strava.com/athletes/1608875
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    Just though I would chip in on this as I dont normally post to much on here. Just thought I would say well done on the weight loss, thats a cracking effort and I bet you feel 100 times better for it. keep it up. As for the lid, they will grow on you. The more you ride your bike the more you will get into the road bike culture, I was quite paranoid about all the lycra and helmets at first but now i wouldnt dream of going out without it on but thats just my personal preference. I have had a few minor falls before at around 15 - 20 mph and thumped my head each time, my lid took all the brunt of it each time so thats my decision made. As people have said already, who gives a toss what other people think of you, its your life so enjoy it. If people do laugh or joke you will have gone past them in under 5 seconds and you will never have to see them again. In my opinion the benefits out way the occasionl snigger. Saying that I have never had anyone say anything to me or pass judgement. My life my rules. :D keep it up.
    Thank you.
    Also lid= helmet.
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    You can't see the helmet when you're riding.
    Good point. Will wearing a wooly hat underneath be a problem, its minus 5 out there!
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    goonz wrote:
    Firstly welcome and congrats on the weight loss, thats a mighty feat. :)

    As another cyclist I often look at what gear other cyclists are wearing, not to judge but to see whether there are any bits I can gain ideas from or anything I may be missing. Personally I have ridden with and without a helmet, and I feel MUCH MUCH safer with it, and more comfortable. I wear a cap under mine which may help?

    I went through loads of helmets as I was quite *fashion conscious* too and I eventually settled with the one I currently have. Get into your lbs and take a look at the helmets and try loads on until you find one that fits as you like it. White is always a good safe colour and will go with anything.

    Personally safety comes way before any vanity issues I may have. You mention your community, I am of Indian origin and no one in community rides a bike let alone decks out fully in lycra and trims their leg hairs. Last time my mates saw me in it they nearly crashed their car! So I wouldnt worry about what others will say, just get out there and churn away! Trust me there is no feeling better than it!
    Thank you Goonz.
  • BigTK wrote:
    You can't see the helmet when you're riding.
    Good point. Will wearing a wooly hat underneath be a problem, its minus 5 out there!

    Depending how much adjustability there is on your helmet you might struggle a little with a thick hat, but you can get some reasonably thin but still warm ones designed to go under helmets quite cheaply. Try your bike shop or pop onto Wiggle/Chain Reaction etc and you'll probably find a bargain. :D
    2015 Specialized Tarmac Expert Ultegra
    2016 Focus Mares CX Ultegra
    2016 Specialized Stumpjumper HT Comp Carbon 29
    2012 Boardman Road Race 105
    2013 Specialized Hardrock Disc
  • Muffintop
    Muffintop Posts: 296
    Hi!

    Wearing a wooly hat - you might want to invest in a Buff if you're not comfortable wearing a wooly hat - I've also worn a couple of running beanie type hats under my bike hat (I can't get with the word helmet) they're a good option when it's extra cold, or if it's raining - it takes a wee bit longer to get wet and you're a wee bit more insulated.

    Mx
    FCN: Brompton: 12, Tourer: 7, Racer: 4

    http://www.60milestonod.blogspot.com
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    Just googled what a buff was, probably will go check them out in winfields store, its an excellent outdoor clothing and equipment store. Need some good fitting thermals, need to be changing my whole wardrobe actually. From xxxl to xl and l. I'm in between xL and L. Thank you for all your help guys. Just had a great knowledge boost from this thread.
    But I'm still greedy for more, lol. What about my bike, anything to add or remove? I have 0 knowledge of road bikes at the momment.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    You can't have too many buffs. This time of year I wear one round my neck and pulled up over my lower face, and another on my head / over my ears then helmet over that. Toasty!
  • gazman1
    gazman1 Posts: 77
    Hi and welcome to BR. Well done on the weight loss, I understand how you feel with wondering what people are saying when you go out kitted up (see my post I've done it) I was very similar just a few weeks ago, once you have gone out the front door and set off you will forget about it, you can always think to yourself hey they're looking at me but what are they doing today, same old same old. Where abouts in lancs are you, have you considered entering the manchester to blackpool ride on 14th July to give you another goal you aim for? Good luck and keep us posted with your great progress, gaz.
  • goonz
    goonz Posts: 3,106
    keef66 wrote:
    You can't have too many buffs. This time of year I wear one round my neck and pulled up over my lower face, and another on my head / over my ears then helmet over that. Toasty!

    What were the pros wearing under their helmets in the San Remo race? Were those buffs or scull caps or headbands? Wouldnt a buff bunch up under the helmet?
    Scott Speedster S20 Roadie for Speed
    Specialized Hardrock MTB for Lumps
    Specialized Langster SS for Ease
    Cinelli Mash Bolt Fixed for Pain
    n+1 is well and truly on track
    Strava http://app.strava.com/athletes/1608875
  • Hollow-legs
    Hollow-legs Posts: 142
    I agree with all the other members above,just get out and ride you bike when it finally arrives.
    I also agree you should invest in a turbo trainer,especially the way the weather is going up here in lancashire :? It will help you set up your bike right,make adjustments,ride the turbo,any aches or niggles ,bit more adjustments,it is easier to do in warm dry house than outside,If you can afford a proper bike fit than all the better?
    Did you have a bike fit at the shop,or a least sat on your purposed bike!

    I had a thing about wearing a helmet when i started riding ,,But now i LAUGH at other cyclists who go by without a helmet on,it is just not worth the risk... :? Sod vanity..

    Also get a good set of bib shorts with a quality pad ,,do not skimp!
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    @ gazman and Hollow-legs, thank you.
    i've been out today trying on helmets. i need a 58-62 cm one at the momment. can wear a thin hat underneath, or a buff, and still have it snuggly fitting. i have an odd shaped head, its like hell-boy's head, as if i had horn on them. the sides of my head need the most room, theyre like corners!!
    i have 3 choices. 2 i can find 1 i cant.
    the 2 i can find are
    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... 71409#tab3
    and
    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_271409
    my bike is white, so i'm ok with both. although the 49.99 one has no room for a hat, its an absolute fit with no hurting. whilst the 79.99 one has abit of lee way for a thin wooly hat
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    @ gazman, can you tell me more about this ride from Manchester to Blackpool. Is it there and back?
  • gazman1
    gazman1 Posts: 77
    Hi TK if you Google bike events 2013 then go to the site there is a list of all the events that are running for the year, it's 17.75 to ride and it's one way, however if you are fit enough there's nothing stopping you from riding back. Let me know how you get on, gaz
  • laurentian
    laurentian Posts: 2,382
    Big TK

    Looks like you're beginning to "shape up" and that you're in a similar position regarding starting off in cycling to that which I was in just over 12 months ago. The difference being that my other half had entered us both for a two day 150 mile ride across Scotland . . . before either of us even had a bike!

    I have found this forum most useful in everything from choosing the right (second hand) bike for my money, the best helmet to buy, maintenance etc etc - it is a really good source of information (including on non-cycling issues!)

    Anyway, your first post asks about a riding routine and I would like to share something that worked and continues to work for me and I hope you find it useful.

    You said that you have a 15 mile circuit that you have done on your mountain bike. From my experience, it would be an idea to do this twice a week (in the evenings when its lighter would be ideal) and then a longer run at the week-end. Say 20-25 miles to begin with.

    In second or third week try to reduce the time it takes you to do the mid-week 15 mile runs (it will reduce!) and increase the weekend distance without worrying what time it takes adding 5-10 miles per week. After a while the 15 mile midweek runs will become easy so increase these to 20 miles, once again trying to reduce the time taken. I was astounded with the distances we began to cover on our weekend rides 30, 40 ,50, 60 miles. Of course they take a bit of planning and you need to think about "fuelling" for the longer rides (although many of the chaps on here would laugh at 40 miles as its little more than a warm up to some of them). I always find a good bowl of porridge prior to anything 40 miles plus is just the job to start but fill your pockets with whatever will work for you and keep fuelled up. I bonked once . . . not recommended!

    There are plenty in here who are far more knowledgeable than I but the above worked for me and I'm sure they will be along to add to or alter my recommendation if necessary.

    Having a target to aim for certainly helped motivate me in the first few weeks so the Liverpool/Manchester thing looks like a great thing to be involved with and will give you something to shoot at.

    Although I haven't mentioned that it also hurts at times, I have thoroughly enjoyed my first year or so cycling - great way to keep fit and the best way to see the world.

    Best of luck and keep us posted!
    Wilier Izoard XP
  • Fil6914
    Fil6914 Posts: 74
    Hi

    Like you i haven't got my road bike yet but have a Kona mtb so i've been eable to get out on that after many moons of it being in the shed lol

    I dont give a stuff about what people say about my lycra clad body even with bumps in all the wrong places ha ha

    I have just picked up this turbo trainer from Halfords

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_229901

    along with the front riser, order and reserve on line for £108 at the moment, its a smashing bit of kit and will help you gain confidence before going out on your new steed.

    phil
    Road - Giant Defy 0
    Road - carrera virtuoso
    MTB - Kona cindercone MTB 1997
  • BigTK
    BigTK Posts: 47
    @gazman. Thank you I've found the website. I'll be looking further into this when I start.