Best upgrades, accessories and purchases for a BEGINNER

HeatherMillsLeg
HeatherMillsLeg Posts: 90
edited January 2013 in Road beginners
What are your's?

Here's mine. Add any info if you think it will help. Cheers.


1) - SPD pedals. IMO these are an absolute essential for road cycling and probably the best bang for buck in performance and pleasure upgrade you can get. I use these http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=3759 Shimano SPD M520 at £17.49 + cashback. Only reason I have changed them, to the exact same pedals is to get them in white! Think I flogged my black ones for about £12 but got to keep the cleats.

Obviously you need some SPD shoes. I got some MTB SPD shoes from CRC for £35 - simply for the fact that I like to be able to walk when I go out. If you shop around you can probably go all in for about £60 - honestly the best initial upgrade.

2) - Smaller cassette. My bike is complete entry level triple. It came with a 12 - 28 IIRC. Problem was I was spinning out way too much. This was the cheapest way for me to get more speed so I bought an 11-23 and it made a massive difference. 90% of the time the bike is ridden like a double but on those really steep hills I am glad of the small chainring.

3) - New wheels. TBH it would have taken me a long time to justify buying new wheels but I got another bike stolen and had to spend the insurance money. I got a Mavic Aksium rear wheel with the money and it did make a big difference to the responsiveness of the bike. As a repeat customer of CRC I got a £10 off voucher with minimum spend of £75. Low and behold they had the front matching wheel in their sale for around £65 so now have a full set.

4) New brakes and cables. My stock brakes were, I think "no name" and silver. They also rusted on the pivot springs. Bought some 105s in black and some new cables as again, they had rusted, from CRC. Excellent brakes - can easily endo on them!

Accessories.

1) Bottle cages and bottles - have never spent more than £4.50 on a cage or £3 on a bottle. Shop around. Amazon and Wiggle.

2) Windproof jacket - Dare 2 B from Rutland Cycling on Ebay £15

3) Waterproof and BREATHABLE jacket - as above but no need to spend more than £50

4) Overshoes - got mine from Planet X for a tenner

5) Gloves

6) Smart phone mount and various apps. I use Endomondo but pretty annoyed at their recent sneaky change. For the mount I use a RAM mount.

7) Bike stand and decent cleaning gear.


Am boring myself by now - sorry!

HTH someone anyway
«1

Comments

  • Calpol
    Calpol Posts: 1,039
    Decent list - the only thing I would not be without is my Garmin Edge 500. I find it a really useful device for motivating me and tracking my progress. Combined with Strava it have become indispensible.
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    Probadly covered the best upgrades & accessories for a beginner,But i hate to state the obvious,But what a about a Helmet !!!
    The best upgrades/accessories from your list that i made when starting was indeed SPDs & shoes,But having read so many forum posts about the dangers of SPD pedals ,especially for the novice rider , i was a bit wary,But i was a bit luckly my first road bike ,a boardman race had toe clips and straps! So ! i was already used to be ready to withdraw/remove my feet or foot when stopping at trafffic lights etc...But was still a bit nervous about converting to SPDs, but it was one of the best and cheapest upgrades i have made,but i would recommend a set of shimano PD-530 pedals as they SPD on one side and normal pedal the other! Great for the novice for stopping and starting and trying to re-clip in at the same time (traffic lights) Plus they are great if you want to use your bike with normal shoes !

    Second upgrade ,has to be wheels .it can make a massive difference ! I gained an extra 2-3 mph on my average speed!
    Something youve missed is a good bike computer ,just a basic wireless helps a lot !

    Good list though!
  • Vinnyc19
    Vinnyc19 Posts: 202
    New wheels definitely one of the 1st upgrades
  • Decent tyres are the best upgrade ive made, and SPD SL pedals and decent shoes
  • Calpol
    Calpol Posts: 1,039
    mwf28 wrote:

    Second upgrade ,has to be wheels .it can make a massive difference ! I gained an extra 2-3 mph on my average speed!


    Good list though!

    Really? All other factors equal you reckon wheels gave you a 2-3mph ave speed increase? Where the stock wheels rubbing on the brake? If this is possible then I will be changing my Fulcrum 5 s tomorrow! :)
  • simon_masterson
    simon_masterson Posts: 2,740
    edited January 2013
    A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    Also, are you really spinning out your 12-28 cassette or do you find the closer ratios of 11-25 preferable? I would never recommend any beginner who lives near any hills to assume not to use a 28 cog. By the time you need to replace the cassette you will hopefully know what best to replace it with; conversely beginners need to build strength and fitness.
  • Calpol wrote:
    mwf28 wrote:

    Second upgrade ,has to be wheels .it can make a massive difference ! I gained an extra 2-3 mph on my average speed!


    Good list though!

    Really? All other factors equal you reckon wheels gave you a 2-3mph ave speed increase? Where the stock wheels rubbing on the brake? If this is possible then I will be changing my Fulcrum 5 s tomorrow! :)

    Doubt it. The wheels probably knew where they were.
  • HeatherMillsLeg
    HeatherMillsLeg Posts: 90
    edited January 2013
    A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    That's cool bro - do you have any advice for a beginner?

    Apologies

    Cheers
  • Or, you're choosing between a jersey that wicks well and dries quickly but lets rain through, or a jacket that keeps rain at bay but makes you sweaty and wicks poorly.
  • Calpol
    Calpol Posts: 1,039
    A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    That's cool bro - do you have any advice for a beginner?

    Or are you just suggesting that beginners go out in the wet and wear a winter jersey like a hard man like you?

    Not the most helpful post is it?

    But glad you feel your comments are helpful!?

    Do you know what a twad is? - cos you are a massive one.

    Cheers
    Actually to be fair on Simon I didn't see anything wrong with his post. He is right about a lot of rain jackets - my sleek Castelli job is pure boil in the bag. With hindsight I wouldn't have bought it. So no real need to insult him. Lets keep it friendly.
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    I forgot to mention i upgraded from mavic cxp 22s to shimano RS80s c24 ,it made a big difference ,maybe in my mind Yes maybe not! So i rode faster! they made me ride faster on average over the same routes! Less effort !
  • Hoopdriver
    Hoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    edited January 2013
    A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    That's cool bro - do you have any advice for a beginner?

    Or are you just suggesting that beginners go out in the wet and wear a winter jersey like a hard man like you?

    Not the most helpful post is it?

    But glad you feel your comments are helpful!?

    Do you know what a twad is? - cos you are a massive one.

    Cheers
    What an ass you must be

    That was a pretty reasonable post. A new wheel set will not make a beginner 2mph faster.

    I myself would go for a waterproof jacket but the suggestion that a winter weight jersey will keep you warm while pedalling and dry out later is still a reasonable one - especially since the OP was hoping to find a breathable and waterproof jacket for £50 or less, something that is just not likely to happen. Most of this winter I have worn a water resistant softshell to very good effect; it gets wet, it dries out later, I'm comfortable in the mean time.

    Your name calling and sarcasm at the close of your post says a lot about you and your puerile mindset I am afraid.
  • Calpol wrote:
    A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    That's cool bro - do you have any advice for a beginner?

    Or are you just suggesting that beginners go out in the wet and wear a winter jersey like a hard man like you?

    Not the most helpful post is it?

    But glad you feel your comments are helpful!?

    Do you know what a twad is? - cos you are a massive one.

    Cheers
    Actually to be fair on Simon I didn't see anything wrong with his post. He is right about a lot of rain jackets - my sleek Castelli job is pure boil in the bag. With hindsight I wouldn't have bought it. So no real need to insult him. Lets keep it friendly.

    +1
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

    strava profile
  • A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    That's cool bro - do you have any advice for a beginner?

    Or are you just suggesting that beginners go out in the wet and wear a winter jersey like a hard man like you?

    Not the most helpful post is it?

    But glad you feel your comments are helpful!?

    Do you know what a twad is? - cos you are a massive one.

    Cheers

    I don't know what a twad is. I just googled it and the Urban Dictionary gives six definitions
    here......http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=TWAD
    Any chance that you could clarify which definition that you mean?

    BTW Simon often gives advice to beginners but I guess insulting him isn't the best way to get it though.
    Disagree with him by all means (I sometimes do :) ) but the insults belong in the playground
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • Calpol wrote:
    A new wheelset won't make you 2mph faster; particularly not an inexpensive upgrade set. There's a generous smattering of psychology in play here. ;)

    But I wouldn't bother with a waterproof jacket; high chance of boil-in-the-bag if you're working hard. My winter jersey dries out pretty quickly.

    That's cool bro - do you have any advice for a beginner?

    Or are you just suggesting that beginners go out in the wet and wear a winter jersey like a hard man like you?

    Not the most helpful post is it?

    But glad you feel your comments are helpful!?

    Do you know what a twad is? - cos you are a massive one.

    Cheers
    Actually to be fair on Simon I didn't see anything wrong with his post. He is right about a lot of rain jackets - my sleek Castelli job is pure boil in the bag. With hindsight I wouldn't have bought it. So no real need to insult him. Lets keep it friendly.

    Yeh very unnecessary, the guys advice is good.....unless its torrential i dont wear anything waterproof as long as im dry. The OP is bang out of order!
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    Jeez! Its friendly around here ? I can appriecate everyones view and comments posted ,This is the beginners section,Some people that post in this section are new forum members and let say it novices....probadly not that clued up or just nervous about posting for the first couple of times!
    I joined to gain knowledge ,to learn ,to talk about road biking, the thing i enjoy most in life at the moment,The thing i want to get better at,even at my late matutre age?
    I came here with an open mind ,to talk other like minded people about biking....Guess i am a little taken aback by some attitudes of a minority.
    I Did increase my average speed with upgraded wheels,On average 1-2 mph faster ,,,,I am sorry if that upsets people or find it hard to believe ,it did ! Maybe it might be the EPO ...kicking in ?
    Maybe i had gained a little more strength since my last ride over the same route, Who the feek knows ,what factors were involved ,but i ride faster with my shimanos than i did with the mavics!

    I quite like it here ! Hard work like an 1" 1/2 hour session on the turbo .

    Finish post with a meaningful quotation " THE EXPERT AT ANYTHING WAS ONCE A BEGINNER"
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    My advice to a beginner would be:

    Buy a decent pump, multitool, tyre levers and spare tubes and always carry them. Practice changing a rear tube at home in the warm / dry / daylight. Better than your first time being at night in the rain.

    Instead of a waterproof I'd reccommend a softshell like my Gore Phantom. Was out for nearly 2 hours in the blizzard on Sunday; nice and warm and not a hint of clamminess. More than £50 though, but well worth it.

    Buy the best pair of padded bibshorts you can afford. Ditto winter bibtights.

    Replace wheels, cassettes etc only as they break / wear out. By then you'll have a better idea about what you want to replace them with. If you really must 'upgrade' your new bike, treat it to some better tyres.

    If you cycle in the winter fit some mudguards and treat your feet to some Woolie Boolie socks and some cheap neoprene overshoes. Also get some decent lights.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,553
    What are your's?

    Here's mine. Add any info if you think it will help. Cheers.


    2) - Smaller cassette. My bike is complete entry level triple. It came with a 12 - 28 IIRC. Problem was I was spinning out way too much. This was the cheapest way for me to get more speed so I bought an 11-23 and it made a massive difference. 90% of the time the bike is ridden like a double but on those really steep hills I am glad of the small chainring.

    6) Smart phone mount and various apps. I use Endomondo but pretty annoyed at their recent sneaky change. For the mount I use a RAM mount.

    Generally pretty good list but I'd take issue on these two points. A standard triple will normally have a 52 or 53 tooth chainring fitted. If you can 'spin out' on that with a 12t sprocket you are quite some cyclist, I barely ever use my 52 x 12 even when racing. Even with a compact with 50t chainring this whole 'spinning out' that beginners regularly talk about is b***ocks, you just need to learn to pedal faster which will ultimately be a greater benefit than changing the cassette.

    I certainly wouldn't class a smart phone mount as a decent upgrade or accessory. I'd rather just fit a cheap bike computer to the bike and leave my phone well protected in my back pocket.

    One thing missing off the list I would say is a decent set of tyres. Pound for pound probably the best upgrade you can make.
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    +1 to KEEF66 ,
    Yes , Thats the best advice so far! one that i forgot to put in my list....A small lightweight pump ,a couple of spare tubes,Some cheap latex gloves ,,so baby wipes ,,,or something simular ,thoose little wipes that you get with your food from fast food places ,Of course! I never touch fast food mmh!!!cough!!
    I always carry a spare tube , latex gloves ,wipes ,mulitool with me on every ride ,,I once got a flat 20 miles away from home ,4 miles from the nearest village ,no punture kit ,no money ,I did have my pump with me though , Doh! FACE PALM!!! Its quicker riding 4 miles than walking 4 miles !
    You learn very quckly!!
  • Pross wrote:
    One thing missing off the list I would say is a decent set of tyres. Pound for pound probably the best upgrade you can make.

    +1
    I would say that 2nd best upgrade for me was decent brake pads.
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • tetley10
    tetley10 Posts: 693
    Just to be clear. Are we all saying we should buy a waterproof coat or we shouldn't?? :lol:
    I spent a bit of money on a waterproof jacket and wear it with a base layer, possibly two when its been -3. Found it very comfortable. I'm going to invest in some sort of wind proof in future to bridge the gap. Can see myself in pink Rapha.

    http://www.rapha.cc/wind-jacket

    What do we reckon.
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    I have one waterproof cycling jacket ,a SPIUK ,I have only used it once ,extreme downpour ! I did a few rides last november with it over a windproof jersey as KEEF66 posted ,i also have a GORE phantom windstopper jacket second -hand off flee-bay,But the best investment ,my bestest jacket/jersey has to be my ORCA merino torque ,got off e-bay for £26.00 if i remember! it is the dogs bollocks ,i have only worn it once and not in rain yet,but it is quality!
    You can pick on up for less than £50.00 here,as long as you like black!!!

    http://www.startfitness.co.uk/product.a ... P_ID=45992

    Ta dah!
  • velohutts
    velohutts Posts: 288
    As far as a jacket purchase goes , I would recommend a good softshell jacket , hunt some deals down , these will keep you dry being 'showerproof' generally , in all but the most torrential downpour , as was mentioned earlier a cheap waterproof fills up from the inside anyway !!
    All the basics have been covered so far but a set of safety glasses from bolle or similar will keep alot of detritus out before you feel the need to get some oakleys !!
    The rapha softshell is awesome , but not for a beginners section due to cost , gore and castelli do some top jackets and I am sure some of the other brands do but never tried them.
    Enigma Esprit Di2 - Go tI ! Summer !
  • Firstly, cheers gents. :)

    Secondly, the price factor was what I had in mind. Performance fabrics don't always perform as well as you hope they will, and nothing is perfect anyway. Really high-end breathable garments are very expensive. I'm not for a moment suggesting that you should expect to be comfortable doing really long Audaxes (or otherwise spending many hours in the saddle) with nothing waterproof on, but you can't expect something cheap to perform like a Paramo or something like that.

    Thirdly, people like me rabbit on about how little difference the hardware (and its weight) makes because (amongst other reasons) many beginners come along thinking that they aren't fast enough because their bike isn't good enough, or that it's too heavy for their club run, or that a certain upgrade will make all of the difference, etc. If nothing else, it's a distraction. If you want to be better, you have to train harder. It takes a very, very powerful and fit cyclist to truly be better than the bike he rides anyway, but Coppi and Gaul climbed Alpe d'Huez on heavier bikes than most beginners have access to. In this context, do you really think that a modest upgrade of wheels alone is going to knock as much as 9 minutes from your time over 20 miles, assuming that you go from an average of 18mph to 21mph? Or just under half an hour if you went from 10mph to 13mph? This is essentially what is being proposed here.

    Fourthly, I second tyres and brake pads. (though some stock ones are good)
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    Youre a tough nut to crack simon ,I respect your expierence ,knowledge ,your personal views on all things cycling.i do not know your back ground, how long you have been riding ,likewise you know nothing much about me except we both have a common hobby ,yours is a hobby.
    I am new to road cycling ,i have been riding a road bike for just under 2 years now,but i have started to take it further ,No racing etc..Just want to ride faster,longer ,harder,Sounds like the six million dollar man intro.Showing my age!! :?
    I guess that is what every neebie to road biking here wants to achieve .
    I totally agree with parts of your views,but also disagree with some,sorry !
    I am 100% with about training ,hard training and miles on the road is the 1 st and only thing that will make you go significantly faster,I am just getting into how important this is ,It depends how far you want to take it ,riding,training,what level your be happy with?
    But i am a new to this but i know it takes a lot ,i am learning form my mistakes and preconceptions,,
    The debate about equipment not playing a role ,is IMHO like the F1 debate ,The technology of the modern cars against the basic cars of yesteryear,The drivers being better than modern drivers ,Its all relative,
    Back in coppis day the best riders had the best bikes ,There was i believe sub 22 lbs even sub 20 Ilbs bikes,drugs (speed/amphetimines was legal and used by riders,coppi included)
    How would coppi fare against contador ,very simiular styles i believe? How would contador fare on a old bike and vise- versa .
    In my post about increasing my average speed ,i should have worded it differently,On the majority of my parts of usual routes (ie: flats i rode quicker with new wheels)
    Also we have aero dynamic wheels and bikes ,helmets, If it made no difference why use them and just jump on a 1940s bike ,If you see what i getting at?
    Anyway I have huge respect for all members and road cyclists .I now know what real pain is about?
    Yes ! Being fitter is the only way,,but i also apply to SKYs minimal gains policy,,But thats a different topic,,me thinks!
  • mwf28 wrote:
    Youre a tough nut to crack simon ,I respect your expierence ,knowledge ,your personal views on all things cycling.i do not know your back ground, how long you have been riding ,likewise you know nothing much about me except we both have a common hobby ,yours is a hobby.
    I am new to road cycling ,i have been riding a road bike for just under 2 years now,but i have started to take it further ,No racing etc..Just want to ride faster,longer ,harder,Sounds like the six million dollar man intro.Showing my age!! :?
    I guess that is what every neebie to road biking here wants to achieve .
    I totally agree with parts of your views,but also disagree with some,sorry !
    I am 100% with about training ,hard training and miles on the road is the 1 st and only thing that will make you go significantly faster,I am just getting into how important this is ,It depends how far you want to take it ,riding,training,what level your be happy with?
    But i am a new to this but i know it takes a lot ,i am learning form my mistakes and preconceptions,,
    The debate about equipment not playing a role ,is IMHO like the F1 debate ,The technology of the modern cars against the basic cars of yesteryear,The drivers being better than modern drivers ,Its all relative,
    Back in coppis day the best riders had the best bikes ,There was i believe sub 22 lbs even sub 20 Ilbs bikes,drugs (speed/amphetimines was legal and used by riders,coppi included)
    How would coppi fare against contador ,very simiular styles i believe? How would contador fare on a old bike and vise- versa .
    In my post about increasing my average speed ,i should have worded it differently,On the majority of my parts of usual routes (ie: flats i rode quicker with new wheels)
    Also we have aero dynamic wheels and bikes ,helmets, If it made no difference why use them and just jump on a 1940s bike ,If you see what i getting at?
    Anyway I have huge respect for all members and road cyclists .I now know what real pain is about?
    Yes ! Being fitter is the only way,,but i also apply to SKYs minimal gains policy,,But thats a different topic,,me thinks!

    Don't worry; I don't mind being disagreed with!

    I definitely see where you are coming from. You are of course not wrong that 'modern' bikes in some ways are more suited to high-performance. I would point out however that - like F1 - pro tour cycling is big business for the manufacturers. It is their chance to advertise, so whilst deep-section carbon rims and enormous oversized carbon monocoque frames may be stiffer and a bit more aerodynamic, they are also fantastic billboards. The riders will use what they're given.
    My own relative intolerance for 'marginal gains' stems from the fact that the general attitude to life for so many these days is to throw money at things to fix them, and it would seem that a lot of people come into cycling expecting it to be the same way. I reason that if I allow myself to blame my bike, I could start blaming work stress/wife/lack of money/broken dishwasher/etc, and the small gains afforded by equipment are much smaller than the effects of variable performance on the day, and environmental factors.
    My first adult bike (which I still own) is a cheap old Raleigh from the '80s sometime; it has cheap steel rimmed wheels and hybrid tyres, and flat bars. It started off life with a kick stand too, though I took that off. I would think it weighs about 13-15kg. That was all I had to start with, and I just made the best of it. Once I'd done my circa 18 mile commute on it in 43 minutes, I stopped worrying too much about what I was riding.

    But that's just what works for me I suppose; do what works for you! :)
  • Completely agree with this from Simon,

    "Thirdly, people like me rabbit on about how little difference the hardware (and its weight) makes because (amongst other reasons) many beginners come along thinking that they aren't fast enough because their bike isn't good enough, or that it's too heavy for their club run, or that a certain upgrade will make all of the difference, etc. If nothing else, it's a distraction. If you want to be better, you have to train harder. It takes a very, very powerful and fit cyclist to truly be better than the bike he rides anyway".

    My bike is an entry level £600 bike but I have probably spent another £500 buying new parts, kit and paying a mobile mechanic for his services.

    Sometimes I think people do get distracted with "weight saving". A plastic bottle cage or even a metal one is really not gonna affect your performance over a carbon one. The only thing you'll be saving is your cash!
  • mwf28
    mwf28 Posts: 37
    Yeah! We should all just ride our bikes ,,as fast as our bodies and experience/training & equipment allow.
  • Completely agree with this from Simon,

    "Thirdly, people like me rabbit on about how little difference the hardware (and its weight) makes because (amongst other reasons) many beginners come along thinking that they aren't fast enough because their bike isn't good enough, or that it's too heavy for their club run, or that a certain upgrade will make all of the difference, etc. If nothing else, it's a distraction. If you want to be better, you have to train harder. It takes a very, very powerful and fit cyclist to truly be better than the bike he rides anyway".

    My bike is an entry level £600 bike but I have probably spent another £500 buying new parts, kit and paying a mobile mechanic for his services.

    Sometimes I think people do get distracted with "weight saving". A plastic bottle cage or even a metal one is really not gonna affect your performance over a carbon one. The only thing you'll be saving is your cash!

    Bingo. I think one of the best litmus tests is comparing potential weight savings to full water bottles. How much faster do you go without one or both of your bottles?

    If nothing else, lighter is not always better, particularly if it's cheaper. You can get some very light factory wheels for little money, but the rims may well not be very durable, and the hubs might not be very special either. Handbuilt wheels with Miche hubs and Ambrosio Excellence or Mavic Open Pro rims might not be the lightest you can buy, but these are industry standard products. Equally, some pros prefer to use metal parts over lighter carbon equivalents because of superior performance; eg. Cavendish reportedly prefers metal pedals to carbon ones, and I read somewhere that Peter Sagan doesn't use the SRAM Red front derailleur for the same reason.

    But my favourite bike is made from plain gauge steel: Tange No.5. It has 27" wheels with 1 1/4" (32mm) wired Gatorskin tyres at the moment, and an aging rack that's seen better days (and is also rusted into the eyes). It weighs 12kg at the moment. I'm comfortable with that, but when I get around to putting some 700c wheels on (with 700x23 tyres) and removing the rack, I expect it will weigh between 10 and 11kg. I'm still comfortable with that. :wink:
  • Nope! I don't buy this 'the bike is better than me' theory.

    A lightweight bike is likely to be of greater benefit to a weaker rider than a stronger one.

    Aerodynamic improvements are a different kettle of fish though :)
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul