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Squatting: heels raised or not

Mr cyclistMr cyclist Posts: 42
I have seen many examples of the technique to use when squatting, mainly with the feet flat on the ground but I've seen some people that raise their heels. Is one technique more beneficial than the other or do they work different muscles.
Cheers for any help

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  • mattshropsmattshrops Posts: 1,134
    Sorry cant help, I only squat to curl one off. :D
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  • pastey_boypastey_boy Posts: 2,083
    The raised heels help with balance and take away the feeling of toppling over backwards. If you feel stable with feet flat then go for it.
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  • GATESGATES Posts: 53
    Flat feet for wide stance Olympic shoes for narrow stance
  • liversedgeliversedge Posts: 1,002
    Lookup hindu squats - good for hip mobility - but mostly because you don't have sufficient flexibility. As a cyclist you should be very careful to ensure your achilles and hamstrings are supple and well stretched.

    So, for me, cyclists should squat on the heels of their feet and its censored to grass, no half measures.
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  • Folk that raise their heels do so because they can't get them down and squat at the same time - its a stretch issue. If you can - do it - if you can't - practise till you can...!
  • mattshrops wrote:
    Sorry cant help, I only squat to curl one off. :D

    +1

    But do you wipe standing up or squatting?
  • mattshropsmattshrops Posts: 1,134
    wardieboy wrote:
    mattshrops wrote:
    Sorry cant help, I only squat to curl one off. :D

    +1

    But do you wipe standing up or squatting?


    Always maintain good form and finish the job with thighs parallel to the floor. :wink:
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  • Raising the heels is normally to bring the calf muscle into the squat rather than just quads
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,038
    Who cares as long as you sods who squat actually put the plates back onto the rack instead of leaving them on the floor for the rest of us to trip over.... always puzzles me why a lot of gym monkeys actually forego this excellent bit of weight training = PUT YOUR SH!T BACK WHEN YOU HAVE FINISHED WITH IT... sorry rant over guys
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    Folk that raise their heels do so because they can't get them down and squat at the same time - its a stretch issue. If you can - do it - if you can't - practise till you can...!

    An ankle dorsiflexition issue, see http://www.runforyourlife.com.au/downlo ... ue%201.pdf for how to tell and some stretches to help (maybe, I've no idea I have loads and never stretch)
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  • Raised heels if I remember correctly are mainly for heavier weights and balance. As a cyclist, unless you are track sprinter, should be fairly light-weight and you could go flat. I tend to use 2 positions. First is a wider stance about shoulder width with toes slightly pointing out. Then, the other is a fairly narrow stance with toes straight forward. But I do high reps with less then 150lb.

    The wider stance stretches my hamstrings and calfs quite a bit.
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  • lochindaal wrote:
    Raising the heels is normally to bring the calf muscle into the squat rather than just quads
    I hope you're engaging more then just your quads when squatting. If not, there is something seriously wrong with your technique - you're not squatting anywhere near deep enough.
    pastey_boy wrote:
    The raised heels help with balance and take away the feeling of toppling over backwards. If you feel stable with feet flat then go for it.
    Raised heels if I remember correctly are mainly for heavier weights and balance. As a cyclist, unless you are track sprinter, should be fairly light-weight and you could go flat. I tend to use 2 positions. First is a wider stance about shoulder width with toes slightly pointing out. Then, the other is a fairly narrow stance with toes straight forward. But I do high reps with less then 150lb.

    The wider stance stretches my hamstrings and calfs quite a bit.
    Raising heels for balance and big weight just demonstrates that you're lifting beyond your technique and capabilities. I see shocking technique (on all lifts) in the gym and some of that is taught by the PTs. Learn to squat properly from a qualified S&C coach or risk injury. And if you want to self-teach, use a recognised manual.

    EDIT: And just in case that wasn't explicit enough... no raised heels.
    JGSI wrote:
    Who cares as long as you sods who squat actually put the plates back onto the rack instead of leaving them on the floor for the rest of us to trip over.... always puzzles me why a lot of gym monkeys actually forego this excellent bit of weight training = PUT YOUR SH!T BACK WHEN YOU HAVE FINISHED WITH IT... sorry rant over guys
    I'm 100% with you on this. Not sure why the gym neanderthals think they're exempt :evil:
  • prb007prb007 Posts: 703
    You need to get the better half involved; though this girl DEFINITELY has her heels off the floor!
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  • AndyD2574AndyD2574 Posts: 1,034
    Squat with flat feet (take your trainers off and do in socks) and push up through your heels.......thats how to squat properly and engage the muscles you need to cycle.
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  • Feet should be flat. As stated, it's a flexibility issue if your heels are coming off the floor. One cue to stop this is to try to point your toes up when this happens, it will help keep your heels down.

    Not sure if you're talking about weighted squats or bodyweight squats? Either way, the best thing to do is get some instruction on proper form before going heavy in the squat. Bad habits can cause major injuries. There's plenty of videos on the squat around the web, or invest in a book like Rippetoes Starting Strength ... probably the only 'weight training' book you'll ever really need.
  • ut_och_cyklaut_och_cykla Posts: 1,594
    uberkraaft wrote:
    , or invest in a book like Rippetoes Starting Strength ... probably the only 'weight training' book you'll ever really need.

    +1
    great book - couldn't quite believe someone could write such a big book about basically 3 exercises but yes - it's all most people will ever need....
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