Forum home Road cycling forum Training, fitness and health

Training on rollers, for balance.

jezzpalmerjezzpalmer Posts: 389
I bought some rollers to add a bit of spice to the indoor training, and primarily to develop some balance skills and core control.

Thankfully I've got a hallway of the ideal width to lean on either side should it go wrong
After an initial few mins of wondering if I could send them back I sussed out how to get started, and I'm now getting the hang of it and can pedal away for 30 mins without much trauma, so now want to expand on this.

The question is, are there any structured routines for rollers that specifically target balance?

Such as ride at a very low cadence in the lowest gear for a few mins, or ride with one hand on your head for 3 mins, no handed for a few mins?

Posts

  • Post it on YuTube when it all goes wrong.....
    My pen won't write on the screen
  • GiantMikeGiantMike Posts: 3,139
    Do you struggle with balance? What advantage do you think you will get from improving balance (if that's actually possible)?
  • bigpiklebigpikle Posts: 1,690
    if you can ride a bike then you can balance on rollers...

    you might work on control skills by moving to riding 1 handed and then trying no hands - that will help with balance and smoothness I guess. Try reaching to a water bottle for a real challenge :D The other thing you can try is simply riding from edge to edge of the rollers, especially without looking down to gauge your position.

    Not really sure they specifically help with anything other than balance on the rollers but might give you something to focus on, other than the usual intervals....
    Your Past is Not Your Potential...
  • I believe that with rollers it's possible to improve balance and therefore precision, maintaining a line and general bike handling.
    Everything I've read about rollers says that they improve your balance.

    Years ago I could ride to school no handed, but struggle now.
    That said I managed a few mins earlier on the rollers, as long as the wheel speed and cadence were just right.
    But it's easier than on the road as I know if it goes wrong I just lean on the wall, not hit the deck so the pressure is off.
  • Bigpikle wrote:
    you might work on control skills by moving to riding 1 handed and then trying no hands - that will help with balance and smoothness I guess.

    Have done a bit of that, I struggled to change gear when I first started without the bike equivalent of a tank slapper, so things have come on quite well.
    Bigpikle wrote:
    Try reaching to a water bottle for a real challenge :D The other thing you can try is simply riding from edge to edge of the rollers, especially without looking down to gauge your position.

    I like the bottle idea, will try zipping a jacket too.
    I struggle looking ahead fearing I'll fall off the edge, so I need to work on that.
    Bigpikle wrote:
    Not really sure they specifically help with anything other than balance on the rollers but might give you something to focus on, other than the usual intervals....

    I just read something about peddling one legged, will give that a go; that said 2 legged could be lot smoother.
  • One useful training technique to develop on the rollers is increasing top end cadence at the same time as improving pedalling efficiency. Otherwise known as Rev Outs.

    Find the tipping point where the ability to keep the front wheel controlled and central to the roller is compromised by cadence. Back off a bit and increase cadence again all the time keeping control. Tip. push your asre in to the saddle at the tipping point. Work on this for a few weeks and your rev-out cadence and stability will start to improve.

    Post your video when you can get close to being able to do this... 8)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVbwngNoHm0

    Oh, and only legged cyclists benefit from one legged pedalling.
    Live to ski
    Ski to live
  • bigpiklebigpikle Posts: 1,690
    You should be riding looking ahead on rollers - 10x better balance anyway, and it breeds better habits on the road anyway, as you really shouldnt be looking down during any group riding in particular.

    Find a point to focus on and maybe find a point that equates to the mid-point of the rollers and just aim for that. I often put my laptop on a shelf in front of me so I can monitor all the numbers in Golden Cheetah and avoid looking down at the Garmin.

    I have my iPod on the garage workbench next to me and it soon gets the balance improved by reaching over to change songs etc.
    Your Past is Not Your Potential...
  • AlanWAlanW Posts: 291
    But what ever you do make sure that the kids aren't filming you when you have your i-Pod plugged in. :oops:

    Grrrrrr
    "You only need two tools: WD40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD40. If it moves and it shouldn't, use duct tape"
  • Those rev out drills look interesting, that's some core control not to be bouncing around.
    I shall add some of that to the list of things to do, I feel that's more likely to end in tears than the no handed.

    The forward looking on the rollers is just a mental block/irrational fear thing whilst on the rollers, I don't feel I have the same issue on the road. In fact when I'm in the rollers I probably am more stable looking ahead, but just don't think I am so keep looking down to check.
    Using golden cheetah instead of looking at the Garmin is a good idea, will rig something up.
  • AlanW wrote:
    But what ever you do make sure that the kids aren't filming you when you have your i-Pod plugged in. :oops:

    Grrrrrr

    Oh dear. :lol:
  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 20,608
    AlanW wrote:
    But what ever you do make sure that the kids aren't filming you when you have your i-Pod plugged in. :oops:

    Grrrrrr

    fantastic
  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    jezzpalmer wrote:
    I bought some rollers to add a bit of spice to the indoor training, and primarily to develop some balance skills and core control.

    I would have thought skates or skate board would have been better to control balance. My balance has never been that good and after teaming up with MTB'ers this year I find it's pretty useless in comparison. But I have got better and have found it great fun learning to stay upright on some country tracks.
    ...................................................................................................

    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    If you want to improve your core strength and balance, try some XC roller skis or nordic blading (inline with poles) - I can get up to 30kph on mine. Great winter training when you only have limited time.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
Sign In or Register to comment.