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Cold weather riding..just go and do it?

BeastwoodukBeastwooduk Posts: 59
edited October 2012 in Road beginners
So wanting to try my new bike out over this now cold spell..best thing is to wrap up and just go? My research tells me to avoid leaves wet manholes etc amything else to look out for? Other than ice ? My new bike has vit zaffiro slicks on will changing to dif tyres make a massive diference? Any advice greatly recd for this recent convert
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  • TakeTurnsTakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    Tyres make a huuuuuuuuge difference. My slicks would skid on hill climbs, cornering and even when I cornered over a drain at like 10mph. I bought conti 4000s and I haven't yet skidded. Could be because I'm more cautious, but they're definitely good.

    Get used to braking in the wet. It takes about 5 times longer to stop if you have calipers. Make sure to warm up properly when setting off and the rest should be fine.
  • Thx for info, i may change tyres then as not much mileage on the slicks and save them for next year..
  • saprkzzsaprkzz Posts: 592
    Conti's 4000s are my choice as well, after crashing in the wet last year i have never riden on slicks since. I use the 4000s all year round, brilliant tyres. I have got Four seasons conti's in the garage, was going to swap them over soon.

    It is all about getting out, dont take it too fast, nice steady base rides and shorter mileage, and you will enjoy the rides much better. We usually go out for 30 miles on a Friday night, but now the dark windy cold evening are here have dropped it to 20 miles, Just got back in now, and it was 2c but wear the right clothes use the right lights and you will enjoy it.

    Cheers
  • Thanks again will get some of them tyres to be safe..will keep riding over winter always plenty riing nr me in the fylde so if they r still out ill keep going ;)
  • alihisgreatalihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    You guys do realise that tread patterns have nothing to do with grip for road riding..


    Continental have to add minimal patterns to appease fools that think it makes a difference.
  • So stay with the slicks then?
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    You want a tyre with a soft rubber compound that's still supple when cold, that's one way car snow tyres work. That way it'll still dig into the road.

    When it's really cold (below 4C) I find a poncho sort of thing works. Mine has zips up both sides to control the airflow, so I can be toasty warm or let the sweat get out. Neoprene overshoes and a skull cap under the helmet are essential. But if it's above 6C I just wear my long sleeved top with my short sleeved summer top under it, wicks the sweat away and keeps me warm.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • TakeTurnsTakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    The term slick is used for racing tyres. Racing tyres are specifically designed for dry conditions. Wet roads severely diminish the traction because of aquaplaning due to water trapped between the tyre contact area and the road surface.

    Don't use 'slick' tyres in the wet. Go for something which is designed to be used in all conditions i.e conti 4000.
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    That may be true for car tyres but the contact patch on racing tyres is so narrow it's far less of an issue. Also the speeds are far lower so the water has more time to be displaced.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    TakeTurns wrote:
    The term slick is used for racing tyres. Racing tyres are specifically designed for dry conditions. Wet roads severely diminish the traction because of aquaplaning due to water trapped between the tyre contact area and the road surface.

    Don't use 'slick' tyres in the wet. Go for something which is designed to be used in all conditions i.e conti 4000.

    Sorry, but you're wrong.

    Firstly, do you actually think it's possible to aquaplane on a bicycle? Go do some research on that and educate yourself. And has has been pointed out already, the tread on road bike tyres makes approximately zero difference to grip. All 'slick' road bike tyres can be used in the wet. Some have better grip than others, but that's got nothing to do with silly little bits of tread.
    More problems but still living....
  • amaferanga wrote:
    TakeTurns wrote:
    The term slick is used for racing tyres. Racing tyres are specifically designed for dry conditions. Wet roads severely diminish the traction because of aquaplaning due to water trapped between the tyre contact area and the road surface.

    Don't use 'slick' tyres in the wet. Go for something which is designed to be used in all conditions i.e conti 4000.

    Sorry, but you're wrong.

    Firstly, do you actually think it's possible to aquaplane on a bicycle? Go do some research on that and educate yourself. And has has been pointed out already, the tread on road bike tyres makes approximately zero difference to grip. All 'slick' road bike tyres can be used in the wet. Some have better grip than others, but that's got nothing to do with silly little bits of tread.


    So what tyre to use in the winter?
  • danowatdanowat Posts: 2,877
    amaferanga wrote:
    TakeTurns wrote:
    The term slick is used for racing tyres. Racing tyres are specifically designed for dry conditions. Wet roads severely diminish the traction because of aquaplaning due to water trapped between the tyre contact area and the road surface.

    Don't use 'slick' tyres in the wet. Go for something which is designed to be used in all conditions i.e conti 4000.

    Sorry, but you're wrong.

    Firstly, do you actually think it's possible to aquaplane on a bicycle? Go do some research on that and educate yourself. And has has been pointed out already, the tread on road bike tyres makes approximately zero difference to grip. All 'slick' road bike tyres can be used in the wet. Some have better grip than others, but that's got nothing to do with silly little bits of tread.


    So what tyre to use in the winter?

    Same as spring, summer & autumn
  • Ber NardBer Nard Posts: 827
    The usual reason to change tyres for winter is to run something with better puncture resistance. There's likely to be more debris on the road that can cause a puncture in winter than summer (though the summer we've had that's probably a moot point).

    If you want to change your tyres, go for something like Gatorskins that have better puncture protection. As has already been said, the grip comes from the rubber compound but no tyre will grant you impunity from careless riding over wet metal work and road markings.

    Rob
  • saprkzzsaprkzz Posts: 592
    You guys do realise that tread patterns have nothing to do with grip for road riding..


    Continental have to add minimal patterns to appease fools that think it makes a difference.

    Tread patterns were never mentioned!.. Just two people recomending 4000s.
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    TakeTurns wrote:
    Tyres make a huuuuuuuuge difference. My slicks would skid on hill climbs, cornering and even when I cornered over a drain at like 10mph. I bought conti 4000s and I haven't yet skidded. Could be because I'm more cautious, but they're definitely good.

    Get used to braking in the wet. It takes about 5 times longer to stop if you have calipers.

    Oh come on! Where are you getting this from?

    And like others have said, aquaplaning is definitely not an issue for bicycles.

    OP, I personally don't bother with winter specific tyres, I use Michelin Pro Race 3 all year round on 2 different bikes.

    The only thing I do different in winter is simply not to ride if it's snowy or icy.
  • Ber NardBer Nard Posts: 827
    saprkzz wrote:
    You guys do realise that tread patterns have nothing to do with grip for road riding..


    Continental have to add minimal patterns to appease fools that think it makes a difference.

    Tread patterns were never mentioned!.. Just two people recomending 4000s.

    But both somehow differentiating between GP4000s and "slicks".

    Rob
  • It's not so much the cold that's the problem but if it's wet .. and that can happen at any time of the year. When it's just cold make sure your warm and off you go.

    However when its wet\possibly icy then I think the best advice is to:
    1. Slow down, and
    2. Concentrate even more on what's going on around you as you have a lot less time to react (becuase you can't just slam the anchors on).

    Your tyres can make a difference but will not make enough of one compared to just taking it a bit easier and anticipating things before they happen.

    If you do get yourself into a situation then try to:
    3. Don't panic (easy to say)
    4. No sudden changes of direction (either slowing down or steering)
    5. Try and stay balanced on your bike - a light touch through the handle bars.. feel what it's doing and pay attention to the signals it's sending back to your hands, bum and to a lesser extent your feet.

    Unless your really unlucky your bike, and how it's handling the road surface, should be giving you clues all the time - pay attention and listen to it. BTW If your cold the paying attention bit might be difficult - so there's another reason to make sure you've got the right clothing.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

    strava profile
  • .. ohh and I've ridden for the last year on 23mm gatorskins. They are not perfect (I can wheel spin them in damp conditions) but do offer good puncture protection.

    I've ridden over a 5 mile stretch of sheet ice with them on. I can't imagine any tyre, other than studded ones, would have made it any easier. I just went in straight lines, very slowly. When I wanted to change direction I slowed down to a stop, lifted the bike up and pointed it in the direction I wanted to go and oh so very carefully started pedalling again.

    Probably the worst surface I've ever ridden over at speed was compacted clay\mud with a lovely sheen of fresh rain (not enough rain to wash it way, just enough to lubricate the surface). I could feel the tyres slidding a mm or two to the left and right at about 30 mph - I just hung on and did absolutely nothing until I popped out the other side. It was very dark, I should have been travelling slower, .. a farmer had obvioulsy driven out of a field onto the road during the day and then a few cars had compacted the clay down to a uniform layer of lethalness for about 30-40 metres.

    In both of these situations the tyres made sod all difference. In the first case I could (should?) have turned around and gone back home. In the second case I should have been travelling slower but at least I didn't panic and try to slow down or change direction .. that would have ended in tears.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

    strava profile
  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,527
    on the road, irrespective of wet or dry, slick tyres are best (if the road has snow or ice on it, things change!)

    compared to slicks, tread on tarmac has less traction and poorer grip

    compound is what makes the difference on road slicks, the gp4000s has uses one of conti's grippy black chili compounds, cheap tyres tend to have less grippy compounds

    as above, aquaplaning is not an issue for road bike tyres, their size, pressure and speed are outside the zone where it occurs

    always take care with wet ironwork, no turning/braking, also, aside from being slippy, leaves and puddles can hide potholes, debris etc. so it's best to not ride through them

    in the rain, just skimming the pads on the rims before you need to brake will clear water, this avoid the nasty lag in braking force you can otherwise get with wet rims/pads

    clothing, wear layers, avoid cotton/similar as they just soak up sweat and then you chill, a mesh baselayer is good as even if you sweat it keeps the other layers from touching your skin
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Thanks all some great advice, just been out this am, lovely and cold...guess ill just get out there be cautious and get sone bike experience in all conditions, ive had one nasty crash when i started so hence my question so figured id get as much advice as possible, i am loving my new bike tho ! Thx again all
  • TakeTurnsTakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    amaferanga wrote:
    Sorry, but you're wrong.

    Firstly, do you actually think it's possible to aquaplane on a bicycle? Go do some research on that and educate yourself. And has has been pointed out already, the tread on road bike tyres makes approximately zero difference to grip. All 'slick' road bike tyres can be used in the wet. Some have better grip than others, but that's got nothing to do with silly little bits of tread.

    Aquaplaning can occur on a bike. Its just a matter of circumstance. How about you do some proper research and educate yourself. http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?t=910742

    I know that tread has nothing to do with the grip the tyre will provide, nobody mentioned that tread improves grip. There isn't enough contact for the same water dispersing effect to take place on a car tyre, hence why tread is useless for bike tyres.

    It's about the compound. When 'slick' tyres are mentioned, like the ones OP have, the compound is not sufficient in wet weather and is best suited for dry conditions. Which is why I said to get conti4000's because they're an all season.
  • Just as an aside...would it be worth me upgrading the tyres anyway from my zaffiro slicks? Irrespective of road conditions?
  • NewTTerNewTTer Posts: 463
    edited October 2012
    TakeTurns wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    Sorry, but you're wrong.

    Firstly, do you actually think it's possible to aquaplane on a bicycle? Go do some research on that and educate yourself. And has has been pointed out already, the tread on road bike tyres makes approximately zero difference to grip. All 'slick' road bike tyres can be used in the wet. Some have better grip than others, but that's got nothing to do with silly little bits of tread.

    Aquaplaning can occur on a bike. Its just a matter of circumstance. How about you do some proper research and educate yourself. http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?t=910742

    I know that tread has nothing to do with the grip the tyre will provide, nobody mentioned that tread improves grip. There isn't enough contact for the same water dispersing effect to take place on a car tyre, hence why tread is useless for bike tyres.

    It's about the compound. When 'slick' tyres are mentioned, like the ones OP have, the compound is not sufficient in wet weather and is best suited for dry conditions. Which is why I said to get conti4000's because they're an all season.
    Thats on a MOTORBIKE, where it is possible to generate sufficient speed to aqua plane, thus the tread to clear the water becomes a crucial factor, TOTALLY not relevant on a bicycle, in fact on a bicycle the less tread pattern the greater grip available, do to a higher cross sectional area of contact patch. Bicycle tyres have a tread pattern for cosmetic reasons only on the road, they do however have a use for off road use obviously.
    Compound will also have little effect, as is it difficlut to impossible to generate enough heat in a bicycle tyre that will require much if any chemical engineering to the compounds. Again totally different on a motorbike. Most "winter" tyres for bicycles are about offering puncture protection, as the roads get in a greater mess during the winter, also rain acts as a lubricant to flint and stone shards allowing them to puncture with greater ease
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    TakeTurns wrote:
    Aquaplaning can occur on a bike. Its just a matter of circumstance. How about you do some proper research and educate yourself. http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?t=910742
    You are chatting bollocks you idiot. And reading a thread on a forum is hardly 'proper research' - especially when the forum you've linked to is a motorcycle forum!
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • TakeTurnsTakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    NewTTer wrote:
    TakeTurns wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    Sorry, but you're wrong.

    Firstly, do you actually think it's possible to aquaplane on a bicycle? Go do some research on that and educate yourself. And has has been pointed out already, the tread on road bike tyres makes approximately zero difference to grip. All 'slick' road bike tyres can be used in the wet. Some have better grip than others, but that's got nothing to do with silly little bits of tread.

    Aquaplaning can occur on a bike. Its just a matter of circumstance. How about you do some proper research and educate yourself. http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?t=910742

    I know that tread has nothing to do with the grip the tyre will provide, nobody mentioned that tread improves grip. There isn't enough contact for the same water dispersing effect to take place on a car tyre, hence why tread is useless for bike tyres.

    It's about the compound. When 'slick' tyres are mentioned, like the ones OP have, the compound is not sufficient in wet weather and is best suited for dry conditions. Which is why I said to get conti4000's because they're an all season.
    Thats on a MOTORBIKE, where it is possible to generate sufficient speed to aqua plane, thus the tread to clear the water becomes a crucial factor, TOTALLY not relevant on a bicycle, in fact on a bicycle the less tread pattern the greater grip available, do to a higher cross sectional area of contact patch. Bicycle tyres have a tread pattern for cosmetic reasons only on the road, they do however have a use for off road use obviously.
    Compound will also have little effect, as is it difficlut to impossible to generate enough heat in a bicycle tyre that will require much if any chemical engineering to the compounds. Again totally different on a motorbike. Most "winter" tyres for bicycles are about offering puncture protection, as the roads get in a greater mess during the winter, also rain acts as a lubricant to flint and stone shards allowing them to puncture with greater ease

    I stand corrected. I picked up elsewhere that bicyles can aquaplane, so the thought stuck with me. Appreciated that you actually explained the reasons why they can't. Unlike others who simply choose to act derogatory because it's the internet. :)
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    You're welcome.
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • TakeTurnsTakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    Herbsman wrote:
    You're welcome.

    Your.
  • ShutUpLegsShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    Think before you post eh?
  • Well u have all inspired me to go out again today! Make the most of the weather..thx all for all advice
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    TakeTurns wrote:
    Herbsman wrote:
    You're welcome.

    Your.

    Unbelievable irony.
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