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Americans...

buckmulliganbuckmulligan Posts: 1,031
edited October 2012 in The cake stop
I don't know if there are any golf fans on here, but watching the Ryder Cup I can't get over what a disgrace the American fans are. Booing the European players the whole way round the course, shouting abuse at them before every shot. I thought the tensions were supposed to have eased a bit in recent years, but seeing some of the interviews with the players and commentators it seems as though the atmosphere is worse than ever. Frankly I'd be embarassed to be representing them if I was on the American team.
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  • Not to mention the inevitable moron in the crowd who shouts 'GET IN THE HOLE!!!' after every shot. Someone shoot them please!
  • lc1981lc1981 Posts: 820
    There was something on the radio about the difference between American and European fans earlier in the week. The pundits they spoke to suggested that many of the Americans who go to watch the Ryder Cup are general sports fans (so they'll watch NFL, baseball, basketball and other sports, interchangeably), whereas the Europeans present tend to be proper golf fans. This was identified as one of the key differences that results in the different behaviour of the two sets of fans.
  • lc1981lc1981 Posts: 820
    It was the last item on Friday's Today programme, from 2:55 here.
  • Gazzetta67Gazzetta67 Posts: 1,892
    And they wonder why the whole world hates them eh - Gung Ho pish. even that hand on heart shyte when the national anthem is being played. Yes were always been told greatest country in the world ???? (just dont tell that to the black folks of New Orleans who's houses and streets have been left like a warzone).Well seeing as only about 9% of americans actually have a passport and dont know were any other country is you can see their ignorant inbred thoughts. A country thats brought us George Bush, Sarah Palin & now Mitt Romney yes you get the picture who's the laugh actually on.
  • I was in Dublin a few years back and was talking to an American student, she was very pleasant. I confessed, all the Americans I've ever met (bearing in mind I've never been to America) have been thouroughly nice/decent people and good company. So why I asked her do I not like Americans.

    We aren't all like the idiots you see/hear on the tv and generally we as a race are not really worldly wise, most of us haven't even got passports let alone travel.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • I was in Spain at a museum and a really enthusiastic guide was explaining about the design of the cathedral when from the back an elderly american - in stereotypical baseball cap, t shirt and shorts, shouted out "Por favor...LOUDER!!!" :D
    The dissenter is every human being at those moments of his life when he resigns
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  • finchyfinchy Posts: 6,689
    If there's one thing for which we Europeans definitely, definitely should not be criticising the Americans, it's the behaviour of sports fans.
  • They don't boo Luke Donald. They all love him. He went to Northwestern University in Chicago the US on a golf scholarship.

    I think they will cheer someone who they know, or watch a lot. But any European Tour player is fair game as far as the fans are concerned.
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  • The label 'American' never really covers it adequately in anyway as it covers a vast continent with cultural differences that makes our regional variations look very insignificant indeed. Some of its own inhabitants are unable to comprehend it let alone any outsiders. I've merely dipped a toe into American history and culture and it continues to be a complex, fascinating and sometimes completely unfathomable place but I've read enough to know that judging a nation on a golf tournament is probably a little short-sighted.

    If you want to try the other side of the coin then the literature of Mark Twain is more than capable of making other cultures seem equally absurd.
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    At the minute it looks like Europe *might* win it, which would be sufficient payback for any nonsense I think
  • Europe win the Ryder cup 13.5 to 14.5.

    Get in there.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • upperoilcanupperoilcan Posts: 1,180
    Europe win the Ryder cup 13.5 to 14.5.

    Get in there.


    What a comeback......Simply fantastic.

    That will teach the Yanks for lowering the tone during the whole tournament........
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  • I was in Spain at a museum and a really enthusiastic guide was explaining about the design of the cathedral when from the back an elderly american - in stereotypical baseball cap, t shirt and shorts, shouted out "Por favor...LOUDER!!!" :D
    And then there's the story of the American tourist in Italy. The guide is telling them about the Sisteen chapel, to which the American asks "Where are the other 15?"
    Couldn't care less about the golf. So they are a bit partisan? Who cares? I never have understood antipathy towards Americans, but then I am yet to meet one I didn't like.
    Ecrasez l’infame
  • lc1981lc1981 Posts: 820
    Couldn't care less about the golf. So they are a bit partisan? Who cares?

    It went a bit beyond partisanship: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/golf/r ... teros.html.
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,443
    I remember similar comments about the Olympics when they were in Atlanta, especially the gymnastics. There was one non-usa coach who said something like "It would be nice if they turned up to watch the competitions rather just watch america win". They employed the same sort of tactics then, noisy and rude.

    I suppose the UK crowd were as partisan this year, but I hope we conducted ourselves with a bit more decorum.


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • laurentianlaurentian Posts: 1,773
    Firstly well in to the European team. What a comeback, what a result!

    I've been to the US many times - playing rugby mostly and have met americans from many walks of life and many parts of the states.

    The first thing that I would say is to support Verylonglegs point that the USA (clue in the name) is made up of lots of different states with cultural and social difference between them. In my experience, the people from New Mexico are as different to the people from North Dakota as the Belgians are to the Greeks. It is nothing like the homogenous population that people over here sometimes think it is. People in Minnesota are as amused and mystified by the Californian pet psychologist using, therapist dependant loud mouth as we are.

    Secondly, as far as sport is concerned, USA rarely gets to get behind a national team in anything relevant on the world stage. Golf and athletics (possibly cycling) are about it.

    They are, without doubt, a sport mad nation - I'd say much more so than we are, but the sports that they are into are different from the mainstream ones over here. The other thing to remember with the US is the massive distances involved in getting to an "away" fixture. (I'm sure this is the reason that USA do not have world class football and Rugby sides . . . yet!)

    The mainstream sports (including, of course, college sports) are, by and large, attended by a (large) home crowd. It is almost always a partisan atmosphere as there is no opposing support to counter the local support.

    When faced with support that "shouts back" I think the reaction was to take this to the extreme by booing the opposition etc. As I said, most americans are not used to there being "away" fans at a fixture.

    Bad sportsmanship yes, but no worse than any international soccer, cricket or rugby match - at least the national anthems weren't booed.
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  • jawoogajawooga Posts: 530
    No overt racism or homophobic/pedophilia chants then? Any of them tweeting about officials dying from cancer?

    Us Brits do it with a bit class although we probably shouldn't be judged on the actions of the minority. :wink:
  • I've been to the states a number of times and to be honest they are a proud nation and when it comes to sport they like to get in your face, nothing wrong with that, they want to win. The issue is we europeans are a little more reserved when we kick censored . Having worked with a number of Americans over here, they fear the Europeans because of the way we go about our sport, they are a huge nation and could potentially beat everyone else at every sport known with the number of people they have to choose from. So for Europe to quietly chip away at them in the Ryder Cup was just so great to see.
  • ProssPross Posts: 25,404
    Europe win the Ryder cup 13.5 to 14.5.

    Get in there.

    Surely you mean get in the hole?

    Did anyone give them a chorus of 'we can see you sneaking out' as they trudged off having watched their team defeated yet again? I wish I'd been able to watch / listen just to hear the U-S-A chants getting quiter as the afternoon wore on and their players capitulated.
  • It’s interesting to contrast this with the roadside support for the olympic cycling events. The time trial was absolutely fantastic as every single rider was cheered to the rafters. Wiggo of course took the roofs off but they must each have thought wtf and loved it. At least I hope they did as the good will was palpable.

    Gosh darn even Americans were welcome!
    I may be a minority of one but that doesn't prevent me from being right.
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  • mr_goomr_goo Posts: 3,755
    Did you see the look on the face of the chap who had to present the Ryder Cup to Olly. He looked like he had been sucking lemons. Just great. Best sporting comeback I have witnessed.

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  • fast as fuppfast as fupp Posts: 2,277
    is the chap with the trophy american? he appears to be wearing an american jacket.
    'dont forget lads, one evertonian is worth twenty kopites'
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    The fan at the 16th tee — at present, it appears to be only one — shouted the obscenity during the fourballs match between Dustin Johnson and Matt Kuchar and Paul Lawrie and Colsaerts.
    The words “F--- you, Seve” were clearly heard by those watching Sky Sports’ coverage on Saturday evening.
    The fan shouted just as Johnson made his tee shot. It has been common during this Ryder Cup for fans to shout slogans at high volume just after a player has made contact with the ball.

    I actually thought this was funny in a daft sort of way - what a censored way to try and wind up the opposition! :lol::lol:

    Seve always seemed like a lovely man and it was very touching to see Olazabal choking up on the 18th when he gave his first post match interview. American fan nonsense aside, I think this was one of the most pleasing results I've ever seen. I'm sure all the European players felt very very happy to have done that for his memory.
  • rodgers73 wrote:
    The fan at the 16th tee — at present, it appears to be only one — shouted the obscenity during the fourballs match between Dustin Johnson and Matt Kuchar and Paul Lawrie and Colsaerts.
    The words “F--- you, Seve” were clearly heard by those watching Sky Sports’ coverage on Saturday evening.
    The fan shouted just as Johnson made his tee shot. It has been common during this Ryder Cup for fans to shout slogans at high volume just after a player has made contact with the ball.

    I actually thought this was funny in a daft sort of way - what a censored way to try and wind up the opposition! :lol::lol:

    Seve always seemed like a lovely man and it was very touching to see Olazabal choking up on the 18th when he gave his first post match interview. American fan nonsense aside, I think this was one of the most pleasing results I've ever seen. I'm sure all the European players felt very very happy to have done that for his memory.
    It was the comeback of all time Ryder cup wise, and to do it away from home in front of such a partisan and at time disrespectful crowd makes it all the more satisfying.Well done European golfers.
    BTW, that's another team chucking their hat into the SPOTY team award ring. :lol:
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • symosymo Posts: 1,743
    I would say though can we not use 'American' with that you are also covering the lovely Canadians and Brazilians who also live in the America's.

    What we are talking about is residents of the U.S.. One of my Brazilian friends gets really annoyed when he sees things about American behaviour.
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  • jordan_217jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    The bloke who sits on the desk next to me is an American. He smells like he needs washing with caustic soda and wire wool. He's a gobshite and general know it all. I'd like to give the [email protected] a nice left hook and snap his jaw. I think I will one day.....
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • lc1981lc1981 Posts: 820
    symo wrote:
    I would say though can we not use 'American' with that you are also covering the lovely Canadians and Brazilians who also live in the America's.

    What we are talking about is residents of the U.S.. One of my Brazilian friends gets really annoyed when he sees things about American behaviour.

    The problem is, what's the demonym for someone from the US if it's not "American"? A "USian"?
  • mercsportmercsport Posts: 664
    lc1981 wrote:
    symo wrote:
    I would say though can we not use 'American' with that you are also covering the lovely Canadians and Brazilians who also live in the America's.

    What we are talking about is residents of the U.S.. One of my Brazilian friends gets really annoyed when he sees things about American behaviour.

    The problem is, what's the demonym for someone from the US if it's not "American"? A "USian"?

    An interesting point, and one that's crossed my mind a few times but never bothered to chase it up. I'd guess 'American' is the one most of those born in the US might use, however it's worth having a look at the term in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonym

    here are a few lifted lines from under the heading 'Cultural Problems':

    To give a more specific English-language demonym for US citizens other than "American" however would be somewhat challenging: United Statian is awkward in English, but it exists in Spanish (estadounidense), French (étatsunien(ne), although americain(e) is preferred), Portuguese (estado-unidense or estadunidense), Italian (statunitense), and also in Interlingua (statounitese). US American (for the noun) and US-American (when used as a compound modifier preceding a noun) is another option, and is a common demonym in German (US-Amerikaner). Latin Americans (who are the most affected by this use of American) also have yanqui (Yankee) and the euphemism norteamericano/norte-americano "North American", which technically includes the USA, Mexico and Canada, but is frequently used in Spanish and Portuguese to refer to the United States only. Frank Lloyd Wright popularized Usonian, from the abbreviation for United States of North America".
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  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,443
    symo wrote:
    I would say though can we not use 'American' with that you are also covering the lovely Canadians and Brazilians who also live in the America's.

    What we are talking about is residents of the U.S.. One of my Brazilian friends gets really annoyed when he sees things about American behaviour.

    "American/America" always means the USA as far as I'm concerned, and it's never confused in my mind with the countries on S.American continent or Canada or even Mexico.


    The older I get, the better I was.

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