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Bike servicing

ButtonsButtons Posts: 5
edited September 2012 in The workshop
I'm in need of some advice on this topic. My bike, a 15 month old entry level Carrera road bike, is off for a service at Evans. The mechanic has come back saying it needs over £200 spent on replacing the chain, cassette, bottom bracket, cables and pads.

Now I'm no expert however I'm rather sceptical - I've had no problem with changing gears, the chain doesn't slip and the bike was serviced at a different bike place about 9 months ago. I'm also fairly confident that with a bit of research I could change cassette, cables, pads, chain etc fairly routinely.

I am somewhat dubious, any experience of this or advice?

Many thanks!

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    well it all depends on what the other shop did or did not do.

    if you are not happy tell them not to do it and take it somewhere else.

    have a read of Parktool for how to do things.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • estampidaestampida Posts: 1,008
    you could buy the parts and the tools to do these repairs if they are required by yourself...


    also there is a mountain of other tutorials on youtube
  • Sometimes a chain and cassette that have worn together will remain smooth together. It's only when one needs replaced that it becomes apparent that t'other is gassed as well.

    I'm not saying this is definitely the case here, or that the guy isn't trying to put the arm in a bit, just that it's possible.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,756
    I suspect the chain has been measured out of tolerance and as such Evans have responsibly said it needs changing, as has been said if the chain and cassette etc have worn together, they'll need changing together.

    BB is easy to check, pads are cheap as chips and very easy DIY.

    Servicing is easy, it's take a look and lube it, don't pay just DIY!
  • I'm not exactly brilliant with my hands but there are very few jobs I can't do to maintain and service my bikes. As others have said it's easy to learn pretty much everything you need to know just using the park tools website and youtube.

    And if you do still have questions there's always this place!
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 12,998
    I suspect the chain has been measured out of tolerance and as such Evans have responsibly said it needs changing, as has been said if the chain and cassette etc have worn together, they'll need changing together.

    While this is true, if you're at the point where a new chain would require new chainrings/cassette too then you might as well keep running everything until it stops working. Probably cheaper in the long run to just replace the chain more regularly but if the stuff has worn together then it'll still work, so just keep using it.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    You do not need to change the cassette every time you change a chain. I get 3-4chains per cassette as a rule, and my experience seems to be pretty much on average. Shops like you to do a cassette each time, but then they would, wouldn't they?
  • pdwpdw Posts: 315
    Get a ruler, go read Sheldon Brown's page on chain wear and decide for yourself. It's possible that Evans used a chain checker that over estimates chain wear - the vast majority do, and it's not unheard of for brand new chains to "fail" with some checkers.
  • There's a lot to be said for a mechanic who's just a mechanic, not attached to a retail outlet.
  • Depending on how much you've ridden it this could be legit. The price for parts and labour sounds right, though its worth checking and giving it a go yourself. Having leanred all this myself this year I'd say:

    Chain - get a chain length checker (park tools) - see if it needs changing. If it does, and is very worn, then the cassette could well be shot too. If the cassette is worn, then it will chew thru the new chain - if in doubt change both.

    Chain - easy to change - will need a chain breaker to resize new chain. would suggest a chain with a "missing link" style (I like KMC)
    Cassette - very easy to change with correct tools (Chain whip, cassette tool & wrench)
    BB - imo a complete pita to change cos you need drifts and the force required to get them in and out (assume press fit - not sure what ur bike has) is a potential for damage. That said, a good clean and lube is probly sufficient - BBs last a while
    Cables - cheap, fiddly to replace, but entirely possible so long as your confident setting up your gears again
    Brake pads - you should know how to do this anyway and it's easy.
    also need to buy some grease and anti-seize paste but these are cheap.

    Net net, you can invest about 50 quid in some decent tools (Ice toolz seems fine for me), replace the parts from online shops and spend a day tinkering. You'll learn a lot about your bike, be more confident fixing squeaks and rattles in the future and in the long run save a packet.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,756
    There's a lot to be said for a mechanic who's just a mechanic, not attached to a retail outlet.
    So leaving a customer who isn't knowledgeable enough to do their own maintenenace to go off and buy what will probably end up being the wrong bits and turning a 1 day job into a 3 day job.....sounds like a good idea....
  • anton1ranton1r Posts: 272
    Godders1 wrote:
    I'm not exactly brilliant with my hands but there are very few jobs I can't do to maintain and service my bikes. As others have said it's easy to learn pretty much everything you need to know just using the park tools website and youtube.

    And if you do still have questions there's always this place!

    +1
    "I have a plan, a plan so cunning you could stick a tail on it and call it a fox." (from the Blackadder TV series)
  • Thanks Buttons for this sharing...
  • There's a lot to be said for a mechanic who's just a mechanic, not attached to a retail outlet.
    So leaving a customer who isn't knowledgeable enough to do their own maintenenace to go off and buy what will probably end up being the wrong bits and turning a 1 day job into a 3 day job.....sounds like a good idea....

    I think you're misunderstanding me quite a bit. All I meant was a mechanic who is simply that, not someone who's under pressure to upsell parts by the nature of their workplace/employment. Honestly, I have no idea where you got the notion posted from.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,756
    Well he's either attached to a retail outlet so suplying the parts they charge for or not attached and buys them in (with mark up, all 'workshops' markup what they sell), the problem is you had an idea and posted it without actually thinking about it at all......
  • I'm pretty sure that's not the problem.

    I've got no problem with a markup on parts. That's a universal issue, be it a mechanic alone or one attached to a shop. What I mean is the occasional tendency of Shop-tied techs to push a customer toward new parts.

    Rather than "not thinking about it at all", I was going on experience. As you're obviously very clever, you didn't need to consider such a possibility.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,756
    Of course some outlets will put 'undue' pressure on mechanics to 'sell' parts, but in most cases where someone lacks the mechanical nouse to DIY service like this it would be sensible to get the parts replaced there and then, he risks a customer coming back before the next service is 'due' complaining the gears are now shot, plus the extra downtime related to the customer bringing the bike back 'again'....

    Your original post by the way clearly stated a mechanic 'not attached to a retail outlet' something your now back tracking on.
  • I'm not backtracking on a single thing. Seriously, have you been reading long?
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,756
    Yeah, clearly longer than since you learnt to type....

    First you said not attached quite clearly, then you said not someone under pressure to sell, so which is it?

    I came prepared for a battle of wits, you appear to have come unarmed......
  • Ah, right. The way those two situations are mutually exclusive.

    By dint of being independent, and not attached to retail, they'd pretty clearly be free of the pressure to sell, really. There's no contradiction or backing off. No-one else appears to find it confusing.
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