Hybrid for fast road use..

skooter
skooter Posts: 264
edited August 2012 in Road general
I want to have a look at some bikes this week and I need to check out hybrids for fast road use.. can you name a couple or three that would fit the bill.
I'm live in the mountains so it needs to be quick..

Thanks for you help..
PS. If this is in the wrong place please move to the right section..
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Comments

  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    "Hybrid" and "fast" aren't words I'd often use in the same sentence! Have you ruled out a road bike for a specific reason?
  • tonye_n
    tonye_n Posts: 832
    Giant Rapid 1 (you can go for the lower models according to affordability. Frameset remains the same down the range, so you can upgrade as required in future).
    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/giant-rapid ... duct/40735

    I've got one of the above. Very light. Same quality frame and for as the Giant Defy range. The only heavy-ish component is the wheelset. I put Ultegra wheels on, and it absolutely flies now!

    Ridgeback Ultra Flight:
    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/ridgeback%2 ... duct/29592

    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/ridgeback-u ... duct/29591

    I had an 2008 Ridgeback flight (basically same as the above) before it was theived and I bought the Giant.
    Just as fast as the Giant, but not as comfy. I think it's just that the rear stays are stiffer.

    The above are essentially pure road bikes, with flat bars. Slightly longer top tube for any given size compared to a drop bar road bike of the same size.
    This is done in order to give you the same riding position on flat bar as you would have on the hoods of a drop-bar bike.

    You can also go for the Specialized Sirrus range. However these are now aimed at the 'hybrid' market rather than pure flat-bar road bike.
    They have v-brakes which allow much wider tyres (presumably to allow for use on tow paths etc), and much taller head-tubes.
    I tried on in my size, and it certainly does not give you the same 'road bike' sensation that you would get on the other bikes above.

    The link below will give you an idea of the kind of bikes in this class.
    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/flat-bar/bi ... lters=true
    http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index ... 01251.html
  • tonye_n
    tonye_n Posts: 832
    edited August 2012
    lc1981 wrote:
    "Hybrid" and "fast" aren't words I'd often use in the same sentence! Have you ruled out a road bike for a specific reason?
    Honestly.... the things some of the BR crowd come up with. :roll:

    I have three bikes. Giant Rapid 1 (hybrid), Specialized Roubaix (drop), Genesis Equilibrium (steel)
    Have also previously had a Kinesis Racelight TK before that was also stolen.

    The Giant Rapid is as fast as any aluminium road bike I have owned. You just have to get a bike with the correct geometry as I have noted in my previous post above. I fitted a narrower flatbar (56cm with bar ends) and it puts me in the same position when on the bar ends, as I would be on the hoods of my road bikes.

    This means that 95% of the time I am no slower than when on a drop bar road bike.
    All of the above ARE dedicated road bikes. One of them just has a flat bar.
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    tonye_n wrote:
    lc1981 wrote:
    "Hybrid" and "fast" aren't words I'd often use in the same sentence! Have you ruled out a road bike for a specific reason?
    Honestly.... the things some of the BR crowd come up with. :roll:

    It was a serious point. Why the OP wants a hybrid is important. For example, is it because they don't get on with drop bars, or because they want rack mounts, etc.?
    tonye_n wrote:
    The Giant Rapid. Is as fast as an aluminium road bike I have owned.

    It's not really a hybrid, though, is it? Not sure how Giant classify it, but I'd call it a flat-bar road bike.
  • tonye_n
    tonye_n Posts: 832
    lc1981 wrote:
    tonye_n wrote:
    lc1981 wrote:
    "Hybrid" and "fast" aren't words I'd often use in the same sentence! Have you ruled out a road bike for a specific reason?
    Honestly.... the things some of the BR crowd come up with. :roll:

    It was a serious point. Why the OP wants a hybrid is important. For example, is it because they don't get on with drop bars, or because they want rack mounts, etc.?
    tonye_n wrote:
    The Giant Rapid. Is as fast as an aluminium road bike I have owned.
    It's not really a hybrid, though, is it? Not sure how Giant classify it, but I'd call it a flat-bar road bike.

    Well the thing is.. the OP was not asking for advise on what type of bike to use for his intended riding habit.
    The request was specifically for information on what fast light hybrids are out there. Potentially for flying up hills.
    I think it is clear that he is asking about flatbar road bikes.
  • tonye_n
    tonye_n Posts: 832
    lc1981 wrote:
    "Hybrid" and "fast" aren't words I'd often use in the same sentence! Have you ruled out a road bike for a specific reason?
    Fair enough... you did not actually mention 'drops'... though it does seem like this is what you meant. :)
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    tonye_n wrote:
    Well the thing is.. the OP was not asking for advise on what type of bike to use for his intended riding habit.
    The request was specifically for information on what fast light hybrids are out there. Potentially for flying up hills.
    I think it is clear that he is asking about flatbar road bikes.
    tonye_n wrote:
    lc1981 wrote:
    "Hybrid" and "fast" aren't words I'd often use in the same sentence! Have you ruled out a road bike for a specific reason?
    Fair enough... you did not actually mention 'drops'... though it does seem like this is what you meant. :)

    Well, there could be other reasons too. I guess I was just thinking that sometimes people rule out road bikes because of problems that are actually surmountable (I won't get on with drop bars, I won't be able to attach panniers, etc.). Was just trying to understand the reasons for the OP's preference for a hybrid.
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    Hi Guys and good morning..

    I started off biking just over a week ago and still need to get a good bike, I live in the mountains so a fast bike will be the way to go for me.
    I had a few bikes to look at first off and I considered some flat bar road bikes which were, namely Sirrus Expert on offer but now sold, Scott S50 the same, now sold and my last which is from CycleSurgery a Giant Rapid 2. CycleSurgery have not replied to my email so I don't know the state of play there - seems odd but...... I thought a flat bar would be easier to ride over a drop model but in truth I dont know.
    Seems I am not going to get a flat bar road bike, so it seems a hybrid or a drop bar road bike is the way I'm going to have to go.
    There is a Defy 3 and Defy 4 for sale over here (Spain) but I dont know what they are like, I read a reveiw that said they suffer a bit on hills, what are your thoughts on that?
    I will be visiting the UK in 3 weeks time and will get my bike whilst I am there but it would be nice to go with some sort of list, either hybrid or road.
    PS.. Price wise something about £700 i was thinking but I have a load of motorbike stuff to sell and if I get a good price for them I could stretch it a tad..

    Cheers
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    skooter wrote:
    I thought a flat bar would be easier to ride over a drop model but in truth I dont know.

    Don't forget that you don't have to ride in the drops - indeed it's rare for people to ride in the drops for more than 10-20 per cent of the time (at a guess). One of the things I like about road bikes is the range of available hand positions (drops, hoods, tops). Perhaps you need to take a few different types of bike out for a test to figure out what suits you best?
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    tonye_n wrote:
    Giant Rapid 1 (you can go for the lower models according to affordability. Frameset remains the same down the range, so you can upgrade as required in future).
    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/giant-rapid ... duct/40735

    I've got one of the above. Very light. Same quality frame and for as the Giant Defy range. The only heavy-ish component is the wheelset. I put Ultegra wheels on, and it absolutely flies now!

    Ridgeback Ultra Flight:
    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/ridgeback%2 ... duct/29592

    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/ridgeback-u ... duct/29591

    I had an 2008 Ridgeback flight (basically same as the above) before it was theived and I bought the Giant.
    Just as fast as the Giant, but not as comfy. I think it's just that the rear stays are stiffer.

    The above are essentially pure road bikes, with flat bars. Slightly longer top tube for any given size compared to a drop bar road bike of the same size.
    This is done in order to give you the same riding position on flat bar as you would have on the hoods of a drop-bar bike.

    You can also go for the Specialized Sirrus range. However these are now aimed at the 'hybrid' market rather than pure flat-bar road bike.
    They have v-brakes which allow much wider tyres (presumably to allow for use on tow paths etc), and much taller head-tubes.
    I tried on in my size, and it certainly does not give you the same 'road bike' sensation that you would get on the other bikes above.

    The link below will give you an idea of the kind of bikes in this class.
    http://www.cyclesurgery.com/flat-bar/bi ... lters=true
    http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index ... 01251.html

    Hi Tonye.

    I did look at the Rapid 2 thats the one they didnt reply too.. I see that the Rapid 2 is £600 but the Rapid 1 is £750 is it worth the differrence as with the Ridgeback Flight 3 at £550 and the flight 4 at £750

    Cheers
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    lc1981 wrote:
    skooter wrote:
    I thought a flat bar would be easier to ride over a drop model but in truth I dont know.

    Don't forget that you don't have to ride in the drops - indeed it's rare for people to ride in the drops for more than 10-20 per cent of the time (at a guess). One of the things I like about road bikes is the range of available hand positions (drops, hoods, tops). Perhaps you need to take a few different types of bike out for a test to figure out what suits you best?

    Do Evanscycles or Cyclesurgery have test bikes perhaps..
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    skooter wrote:
    Do Evanscycles or Cyclesurgery have test bikes perhaps..
    They should do. Details on Evans' test ride policy are here.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    FWIW going 'fast' on a road bike is about getting into a tucked position, something that's very difficult to do on a flat-bar bike for any reasonable period of time because you're effectively presenting yourself as a wind-break. Discounting dropped bar bikes if you priority is speed is nonsense - sure most of the time you'll cruise-around on the hoods or tops, but at least having the ability to change hand position means less fatigue. There are countless threads on this forum from folks wanting to convert flat-bars to drops - but it's seriously expensive in parts and labour
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Given the "assumptions" around here in wind resistance I thought this was interesting the other day-...

    Was watching the live cycling on euro sport (American I think)

    Two riders free-wheeling down hill, big enough gap between them for the leader not to be creating a slip stream. No peddling, just free-wheeling.

    Rider in the lead was sat on the frame tucked in like billy-oh. Rider behind him was on the drops with bum on seat- a visibly higher position & although he was tucked in he was not as extreme as the leader.

    Guess what?

    The rider behind was catching the leader! :lol::lol:
    B'TWIN Triban 5A
    Ridgeback MX6
  • Mikey23
    Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    @skooter ... have a defy 4 and am well pleased with it. entry level but very good reviews and a nice ride. defy 3 is same frame with better mechs i believe
  • Skooter, it's your money mate therefore your choice. However I now tend to regard hybrids as something of a 'gateway drug'. If you want to do quite a lot of cycling you will likley find that having a hybrid will limit your distances. I started off with an admittedly quite basic Claud Butler hybrid and felt I wanted to increase my time/distance in the saddle. I bought (an admittedly basic) Secteur sport in last years sales and it's a far superior steed.

    I was planning on replacing Claude with a hybrid in your price bracket to use as a commuter/canal path/shopping bike but found I enjoyed drops far more than flats so ended up supplementing my stable with a cyclocross bike (Genesis cdf).

    IF you decide you want a hybrid, be canny, the 2012 models are starting to be discounted so bargains to be had if you are cute. The same goes for road bikes too. I like the look of the Whyte hybrids and Focus do some nice looking ones. Don't discount Boardmans either - I recently did the Grt Manchester cycle in an average of 18.5 mph and got comprehensively dropped by a big bloke on boardman.

    Ps - why buy in the UK? They do ride the odd bike in Spain I believe?
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    Monty Dog wrote:
    FWIW going 'fast' on a road bike is about getting into a tucked position, something that's very difficult to do on a flat-bar bike for any reasonable period of time because you're effectively presenting yourself as a wind-break. Discounting dropped bar bikes if you priority is speed is nonsense - sure most of the time you'll cruise-around on the hoods or tops, but at least having the ability to change hand position means less fatigue. There are countless threads on this forum from folks wanting to convert flat-bars to drops - but it's seriously expensive in parts and labour

    I have just found out today about the wind effect coming back from my ride out.. so at the moment a drop bar bike is not out of the question.. :)
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    lc1981 wrote:
    skooter wrote:
    Do Evanscycles or Cyclesurgery have test bikes perhaps..
    They should do. Details on Evans' test ride policy are here.

    Thanks I will have a look later.. :)
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    Skooter, it's your money mate therefore your choice. However I now tend to regard hybrids as something of a 'gateway drug'. If you want to do quite a lot of cycling you will likley find that having a hybrid will limit your distances. I started off with an admittedly quite basic Claud Butler hybrid and felt I wanted to increase my time/distance in the saddle. I bought (an admittedly basic) Secteur sport in last years sales and it's a far superior steed.

    I was planning on replacing Claude with a hybrid in your price bracket to use as a commuter/canal path/shopping bike but found I enjoyed drops far more than flats so ended up supplementing my stable with a cyclocross bike (Genesis cdf).

    IF you decide you want a hybrid, be canny, the 2012 models are starting to be discounted so bargains to be had if you are cute. The same goes for road bikes too. I like the look of the Whyte hybrids and Focus do some nice looking ones. Don't discount Boardmans either - I recently did the Grt Manchester cycle in an average of 18.5 mph and got comprehensively dropped by a big bloke on boardman.

    Ps - why buy in the UK? They do ride the odd bike in Spain I believe?

    I've just wrote on another post about riding against the wind which I've done for the first time..( I've only been riding just over a week) and now its put a different light on things i must say.. so my mate and me are going to Granada on Wednesday and I'm going to try a few drop bars while I'm there..
    I am coming to the UK and getting a bike for several reasons, I need to see my mum, but on the bike front its like this.
    The shops in Spain are hard to talk technical too because of the language.. I know a bit of Spanish but when it comes to medical, technical or legal stuff its not easy and of course the cost of bikes over here are sky high..
    I will get a better deal in the UK..
    But you are right they are bike mad over here..

    skooter
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    skooter wrote:
    I've just wrote on another post about riding against the wind which I've done for the first time..( I've only been riding just over a week) and now its put a different light on things i must say.. so my mate and me are going to Granada on Wednesday and I'm going to try a few drop bars while I'm there..

    That sounds like a lifestyle I could live with!
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    lc1981 wrote:
    skooter wrote:
    I've just wrote on another post about riding against the wind which I've done for the first time..( I've only been riding just over a week) and now its put a different light on things i must say.. so my mate and me are going to Granada on Wednesday and I'm going to try a few drop bars while I'm there..

    That sounds like a lifestyle I could live with!

    I've been here just over 10 years now and luv every day.. it is a great lifestyle.. :)
  • Given the "assumptions" around here in wind resistance I thought this was interesting the other day-...

    Was watching the live cycling on euro sport (American I think)

    Two riders free-wheeling down hill, big enough gap between them for the leader not to be creating a slip stream. No peddling, just free-wheeling.

    Rider in the lead was sat on the frame tucked in like billy-oh. Rider behind him was on the drops with bum on seat- a visibly higher position & although he was tucked in he was not as extreme as the leader.

    Guess what?

    The rider behind was catching the leader! :lol::lol:

    not sure exactly your point but the missing factor is gravity, going downhill is the only real time when carrying extra weight is an advantage and can overcome drag (up to a point), those two riders on the flat and putting out the same power, the more aero position should achieve a higher speed.
  • Crankbrother
    Crankbrother Posts: 1,695
    My gf has a 650c badboy disk with 28mm tyres and can happily do 17mph avg. over 50+ mile rides ... Depends on your legs and perspective I guess ... She was never any faster on her road bike ...
  • Given the "assumptions" around here in wind resistance I thought this was interesting the other day-...

    Was watching the live cycling on euro sport (American I think)

    Two riders free-wheeling down hill, big enough gap between them for the leader not to be creating a slip stream. No peddling, just free-wheeling.

    Rider in the lead was sat on the frame tucked in like billy-oh. Rider behind him was on the drops with bum on seat- a visibly higher position & although he was tucked in he was not as extreme as the leader.

    Guess what?

    The rider behind was catching the leader! :lol::lol:

    not sure exactly your point but the missing factor is gravity, going downhill is the only real time when carrying extra weight is an advantage and can overcome drag (up to a point), those two riders on the flat and putting out the same power, the more aero position should achieve a higher speed.


    I would doubt that, given the front rider was sitting on the top tube! :D
    B'TWIN Triban 5A
    Ridgeback MX6
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    So rather then start another thread on road bikes I'll leave this here..

    Because I'm having a bit of a rethink due to windy conditions.. Please name me a few road bikes if you could, as I'm now thinking of a road bike? same sort of money- ish

    Cheers
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    There's quite a good general guide to what to think about when buying a first road bike here. I'm not sure how much you want to spend, but this article and the comments afterwards suggest some good buys under £1,000 (although not that many, so I would cast the net wider). If your budget is lower, you might want to take a look at the review linked to from here.
  • diy
    diy Posts: 6,473
    never seen the point of hybrids. They seem to fit a place between CX and hard tail mtb. hybrids are pretty crap off road and not much better than a hard tail mtb with slicks on road. So personally I'd go for one thing or the other.

    Either buy an XC oriented mtb and some slicks or buy a road bike. Or both. :)
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    lc1981 wrote:
    There's quite a good general guide to what to think about when buying a first road bike here. I'm not sure how much you want to spend, but this article and the comments afterwards suggest some good buys under £1,000 (although not that many, so I would cast the net wider). If your budget is lower, you might want to take a look at the review linked to from here.

    Just got in from shopping in Malaga but will read these tonight...

    Cheers..
  • skooter
    skooter Posts: 264
    diy wrote:
    never seen the point of hybrids. They seem to fit a place between CX and hard tail mtb. hybrids are pretty crap off road and not much better than a hard tail mtb with slicks on road. So personally I'd go for one thing or the other.

    Either buy an XC oriented mtb and some slicks or buy a road bike. Or both. :)

    Won't be doing any off road mate, but another 24 hours gone by and the odds of a road bike are getting bigger.. :)
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,880
    Mikey23 wrote:
    @skooter ... have a defy 4 and am well pleased with it. entry level but very good reviews and a nice ride. defy 3 is same frame with better mechs i believe
    I got a Defy 4 for my commute - yes, it is heavier than expensive racers, but it is built like a tank with the result I don't worry about damaging it, and maintenance has been minimal. Good value for what you get.