Forum home Road cycling forum Training, fitness and health

Ramadan cycling

ilm_zero7ilm_zero7 Posts: 2,213
edited August 2012 in Training, fitness and health
37-43 degrees of heat - and no drinking (well not publicly)

is it better to give up for a month? this morning was torture!
http://veloviewer.com/SigImage.php?a=3370a&r=3&c=5&u=M&g=p&f=abcdefghij&z=a.png
Wiliers: Cento Uno/Superleggera R and Zero 7. Bianchi Infinito CV and Oltre XR2

Posts

  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    I thought you only had to fast if it didn't seriously affect your health? One could argue that training hard in heat without drinking could do so.
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • estampidaestampida Posts: 1,008
    when in rome..........
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    I saw in another thread that you are allowed to eat and drink if you are doing strenuous work / sport as your "occupation". How about if you get sponsored to cycle a certain number of miles for a worthy cause, would that count? Just an idea.
  • ut_och_cyklaut_och_cykla Posts: 1,594
    Same other post discussed making up for drinking water during daylight time by making donations to charity -
  • paulhinopaulhino Posts: 32
    I love how quiet the mornings have been. The heat has been tough but I rarely drink during a ride so not drinking in public not an issue.
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    Purely out of curiosity - ILMZero7 and Paulhino, is your issue that you are Muslim and can't drink during Ramadan, or are you non-Muslim but effectively not able to be seen drinking in public? Does Ramadan apply to non-Muslims in the countries you are living in??
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    neeb wrote:
    Purely out of curiosity - ILMZero7 and Paulhino, is your issue that you are Muslim and can't drink during Ramadan, or are you non-Muslim but effectively not able to be seen drinking in public? Does Ramadan apply to non-Muslims in the countries you are living in??
    Just answered my own question with Google. So it's actually illegal to break Ramadan regulations in some of these oil-rich gulf states, even for non-Muslims?

    Sorry, but I think that's bloody ridiculous. Respecting the customs and culture of other countries is one thing, but when they extend to enforcing repressive Medieval belief systems and social behaviour on anyone, irrespective of their beliefs (with women getting a particularly raw deal), then they should be vocally opposed by any right-thinking person. It's about time we in the west were consistent in our calls for universal human rights, instead of giving out completely different messages depending on whether or not we need the oil.
  • ZingzangZingzang Posts: 196
    neeb wrote:
    Sorry, but I think that's bloody ridiculous.
    Ever wondered why there are not too many people clamouring to go and live in those countries but plenty still wanting to come here?
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    Zingzang wrote:
    neeb wrote:
    Sorry, but I think that's bloody ridiculous.
    Ever wondered why there are not too many people clamouring to go and live in those countries but plenty still wanting to come here?
    Are you being sarcastic?

    The United Arab Emirates population, for example, is MOSTLY comprised of people who have come from outside, including about 55% Asians (many of whom have effectively no rights and are treated almost as a slave labour force) and 8% western expatriates, who come for the money of course. The immigrant population from these countries into the UK is proportionately tiny, and they are doubtless encouraged (because they are extremely wealthy) by the same Conservative anti-immigration types who are always ranting on about immigration.

    I really encourage anyone to read up on these oil-rich gulf states, it's a real eye-opener, not just in terms of what you learn about the countries themselves, but also what it shows about the hypocrisy and bias of the western media - we hardly ever hear about what goes on in these places because it's not in our commercial and economic interests to complain about it.
  • ZingzangZingzang Posts: 196
    neeb wrote:
    Are you being sarcastic?
    No, but thanks for your irrelevant, conscience-stricken lecture all the same.
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    Zingzang wrote:
    neeb wrote:
    Are you being sarcastic?
    No, but thanks for your irrelevant, conscience-stricken lecture all the same.
    So... (where do I start... :roll: )

    Maybe you could tell me how pointing out the total irrelevance of your (clearly ignorant) post was irrelevant.

    Then you could go on to tell me how conscience is a bad thing, and how ignorance and xenophobia are good things..

    In any case I'm off out for a ride, so don't expect a rapid response to any ill-advised further engagement..
  • leflef Posts: 728
    oops for a minute I thought I was on a forum about cycling.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,052 Lives Here
    It's an interesting question and one I never thought of in relation to cycling.

    Is it not possible to cycle in the evening?
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Ramadan fasting is a joke. When i was in Saudi all the saudi blokes we knew put on weight due to the fact they had feasts every night.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,052 Lives Here
    Having looked into it a bit, I read somewhere that among the exemptions like children, the sick, the pregnant, the nursing and the 'travelling'.

    Would you not fall into the final category?
Sign In or Register to comment.