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Protein Supplements

Graeme JonesGraeme Jones Posts: 361
Hi All not sure where nutrition info questions should be asked so feel free moderators to move if wrong section.

I struggle to consume enough protein through the day. I am focusing on my post ride meals being higher in protein but it is not always possible I am eating more tuna, chicken, pork (lower fat options)

I want to develop my legs to support my knees and riding frequently is supporting this but I suppose all road riders want the impressive legs to go with it :lol:

Would a post ride protein shake support muscle development noticeably? What do you guys and gals have and anything that isn't disgusting?

Posts

  • baldwin471baldwin471 Posts: 366
    A protein powder I've used for years now with great results (And not just when cycling, muay thai training too) is PhD Synergy ISO-7. The banana and Strawberry Cheesecake flavours taste lovely. Best tasting and most effective protein I've ever tried. I had the same problem with getting insufficient protein daily, but what i do now is have two scoops with 500ml milk for breakfast, slow it slowly releases during the day, then 2 scoops with a banana chopped up and chucked in with 600ml milk after a ride. Here is a link to the cheapest i could find it, trustworthy site have used them many times -

    http://monstersupplements.com/store/p/2 ... FORMULA-+-[FREE-Blender-Cup-with-wire-ball].html
  • phreakphreak Posts: 2,125
    According to the article below elite endurance athletes need around 1.5-1.8g protein per kg of body weight.

    http://www.brianmac.co.uk/articles/scni29a5.htm

    Obviously as us mere mortals are not training as hard as the pros our needs would be less.
    Because the typical athlete consumption is estimated at 0.7 to 1.6 grams per kilogram (0.3 to 0.7g/lb) per day, exercise physiologists generally do not consider protein supplementation for the average athlete justified.

    Just through eating normally I can easily get 100g of protein a day, so unless you're pretty chunky I'd say you're already getting plenty.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    If you're sure you need it, can't go wrong with Bulkpowders 82% or Myprotein Instant whey. I buy it in 5kg bags and it lasts for months (literally!)
  • kevin69kevin69 Posts: 87
    I struggle to consume enough protein through the day.

    How much are you aiming for?
  • simon_esimon_e Posts: 1,676
    How have you established that you are not getting sufficient protein?

    I would suggest that anyone should look carefully at their diet (i.e. real food) before trying supplements. Sort the basics first as you can't fix a censored diet with a protein powder. Lots of people don't eat meat yet still get enough protein without having to resort to supplements.

    If you want big muscles then go to a gym and pump some weights, you won't get them just from cycling.

    A previous discussion that might be useful:
    viewtopic.php?f=40011&t=12829100
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • Sharpy_ladSharpy_lad Posts: 61
    Simple answer - no.

    A supplement drink after bicycling containing maybe 30-50g of Protein won't bless you with Tom Platz quads I'm afraid.

    Spinning the cranks on a bike doesn't really stress the legs a great deal for muscle hypertrophy. Usually a balanced diet of say moderate Protein, high Carbs, low Fat is enough to help muscle recovery and for the typical cyclist Protein supplements aren't needed.

    An impressive set of legs for a road cyclist tends to be very lean (and tanned) legs. Most pro cyclists have very thin legs, but the leanness of these guys showing individual muscles, vascularity and muscle striations often makes them look bigger than they actually are. So perhaps it's not actual size you desire, but to be leaner?
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    Have you tried lifting weights?
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • dw300dw300 Posts: 1,642
    Go for 1g per 1lb of lean body mass ..

    Guideline daily amounts are about 45g per day. 1.5-1.8g per 1kg will be a good guideline as long as you're not 30% body fat or more, as you'll not drop weight as fast due to the extra calories from the wasted protein that you can't turn into muscle. But go for 1g per 1lb of lean body mass. You can calculate this roughly with a tape measure, or more accurately with a caliper.

    The key to taking in protein is trying to have some in your system at all times so that you're repairing muscle damage 24 hrs a day. Since its such a slow process you don't want to be wasting a third of your (training) life by not eating right.

    So getting a slow release protein blend that you can take last thing at night will give you most benefit, unless you want to get up for a meal at 3am. Eating smaller balanced meals at 2.5 - 3hr intervals during the day will also add to this 24 hr repair process, and increase your recovery time. It's said that protein is taken into muscles better directly after intense exercise when your body is trying to replenish glycogen stores, so a post ride shake will help if it has indeed been a hard ride. You're talking about a fraction more than normal though, so don't expect to actually see a difference just by taking a post ride shake on its own.

    A very rough guide for body building is that you can add 1g of muscle for every 10g of protein you consume, up to the recommended limit.

    Another important issue is getting quality protein. The more complete the amino acid profile in your protein the more effective the repair. Eggs are best, then chicken when it comes to food. Surprisingly beef doesn't have as good a quality. It's similar to fish, and they're both better than the protein you get in nuts, wheat, etc.

    Your best bet is actually protein powders, as long as it's not to the detriment of the rest of your diet, ie. because you're drinking your protein you're hungrier and then consume too many calories, or, you get the right calories but don't get enough nutrients and fibre because you're not actually consuming enough food.
    All the above is just advice .. you can do whatever the f*ck you wana do!
    Bike Radar Strava Club
    The Northern Ireland Thread
  • simon_esimon_e Posts: 1,676
    An extract from the AIS factsheet on protein. They might be in a position to know a fair bit than your average punter about this subject:
    Generally, athletes can obtain all the protein they require from a good mixed diet. Occasionally, an athlete may require a supplement when a practical way to consume sufficient food cannot be found. Many protein supplements are very expensive due primarily to the amount of marketing that accompanies products and the processing required to extract the protein from cow’s milk. They tend to provide very large amounts of protein and little other nutrients. There is no need for the amount of protein provided by many supplements and there is certainly no justification for the extra cost.
    From http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition ... -_how_much

    Alternatively, just buy the most expensive protein powder you can find/afford. It will impress your mates but won't make you faster and may cause you to gain weight and will give your kidneys a hard time.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    dw300 wrote:
    Go for 1g per 1lb of lean body mass ..
    FFS what is wrong with you?

    Do you measure percentage of volume in 'fluid ounces per litre' and percentage of distance in 'centimetres per foot'?
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • dw300dw300 Posts: 1,642
    Herbsman wrote:
    dw300 wrote:
    Go for 1g per 1lb of lean body mass ..
    FFS what is wrong with you?

    Do you measure percentage of volume in 'fluid ounces per litre' and percentage of distance in 'centimetres per foot'?

    That's 2.2g per 1kg of LBM if you can't handle the complex mathematics.

    Also, it's not a fraction (or a percentage as you said), you simply calculate your weight in pounds as most American's and British people do, and then weigh out your protein power in grams, which is easy since the measures are all given in grams.
    All the above is just advice .. you can do whatever the f*ck you wana do!
    Bike Radar Strava Club
    The Northern Ireland Thread
  • Sharpy_ladSharpy_lad Posts: 61
    Herbsman wrote:
    dw300 wrote:
    Go for 1g per 1lb of lean body mass ..
    FFS what is wrong with you?

    Do you measure percentage of volume in 'fluid ounces per litre' and percentage of distance in 'centimetres per foot'?

    It's a rule of thumb that is simply meant to be easy to remember, you pedantic so and so! :lol:
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    Sharpy_lad wrote:
    Herbsman wrote:
    dw300 wrote:
    Go for 1g per 1lb of lean body mass ..
    FFS what is wrong with you?

    Do you measure percentage of volume in 'fluid ounces per litre' and percentage of distance in 'centimetres per foot'?

    It's a rule of thumb that is simply meant to be easy to remember, you pedantic so and so! :lol:
    Mixing imperial and metric is bollocks.
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • Sharpy_ladSharpy_lad Posts: 61
    Depends what you are used to and how you are mixing them!

    It's bollocks and hardwork if you want to do a complicated calculation mixing them up, but in this case it's JUST a simple, easy to remember, easy to work out formula.

    You know macronutrients are usually displayed on the back of food packets in metric, never in imperial, but people do still use imperial for BW a lot of the time, more so old skoolers like, but still people do still use pounds for measuring BW.
  • alex1robalex1rob Posts: 95
    I'm not a healthy eater, I'll be honest that I go for ease of preparation at the moment while I'm young and studying.

    My post ride snacks tend to be a banana based milkshake, or just milk if I'm running low. But a favourite milkshake is the following

    2 bananas
    glass of milk
    nesquick powder - chocolate
    1 heaped tablespoon of smooth peanut butter

    whiz in a blender - amazing... Plenty of protein and calories in that bad boy. A touch high on the fat from the peanut butter and milk but after exercise your body copes with fat in a more efficient way removing it from the blood stream quicker.

    Quick to prepare and can drink it within the 30-60 minutes post ride window for maximum effect.
  • ShutUpLegsShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    Would a post ride protein shake support muscle development noticeably?

    Probably not
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