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massage

Kona21Kona21 Posts: 107
edited May 2012 in Amateur race
Do you think there is any benefit of getting the odd massage here and there. I.e one per month before a race you have targeted. Or is it only beneficial when your getting them daily as the pros do?
Currently I'm training on Tuesday, crit race Wednesday, 10 tt Thursday and road race Sunday so its pretty full on.
Opera Super Leonardo
Campag Super Record 11
Corima Aero + wheels
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  • Byke_boyByke_boy Posts: 2
    As an ex-massage therapist, I would say that the more massage the better, but anything is better than nothing. If you look for an experienced SPORTS massage therapist, preferably one who has plenty of experience with cyclists, you'll get heaps out of it.

    I'd recommend getting your first one after a race as you'll probably be a bit sore the next day-that does depend a lot on you and the therapist. Like anything, you'll get what you pay for and especially if it's an occasional thing, it'll be money well invested.

    Good luck! :-)
    Some more personal raves about fitness in general and cycling in particular: http://www.myfitnesstip.com
  • Zoomer37Zoomer37 Posts: 725
    If you put in a lot of hard miles then regular massage is superb if you can afford it. Its pretty much essential if you race each week and you want your legs to be as fresh as possible, but yes if its only 1 per month just before a big race you have planned its still more than worth it.
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    I had a sports massage because I have been doing loads of training for a Beach to Beach ride (which is this weekend).

    Had the first massage about 6 weeks ago - just to try it out and see what it was like and because after some long training runs my legs ached for a few days - it really 'unlocked' something. a) Immediately seemed more 'connected' and less effort to tell the muscles to keep moving b) immediately my average speed went up. c) Immediately I could go further with little or no aches after. I also realised I was overtraining and not best technique as I was pushing up hills in too high a gear, so made some adjustments there.

    Was recommended to have one in the last week or few days prior to the event, so did so last weekend. The last couple of weeks I had been feeling a bit 'disconnected' and it seemed more effort to keep pushing. I wasnt sure whether some of that was because I was having to train in the miserable rain and/or having a couple of off-days and/or getting bored of the repetitional loop I was doing, but the feeling was still there when I got a sunny ride on a new route, albeit to a lesser degree. After the pre-event massage I did one more long training run (the same route as I did the day before the massage and in similar conditions) a) I hadnt realised how much fatigue was building up in my legs from the training b) Immediately seemed more 'connected' and less effort to tell the muscles to keep moving c) immediately my average speed went up again.

    I would say that if you are pushing yourself hard an/or not stretching and looking after your muscles really well then it is better money spent than the latest featherweight saddle or bartape or other bling.
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    Science seems to suggest its a load of bolleaux, and as we have all suspected just an excuse for a fat Belgian bloke to get handsy with you when you're too tired to fight back.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1320372/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1724761/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1250256/

    But I hear if you combine it with core training the effects are astounding
  • fish156fish156 Posts: 496
    :lol: The world is just black and white, eh P_Tucker.
  • You're on your own on this one Tucker. I am a BIG proponent of sports massage for preventative and remedial reasons.

    And yes, Tucker is a pretty binary kind of guy.
  • d87heavend87heaven Posts: 348
    Quality research. One of the articles even mentions that it does have an improvement. Perhaps he was too busy doing one handed core exercises with his pot noodle and playboy.
    Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals! Except the weasel
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    d87heaven wrote:
    Quality research. One of the articles even mentions that it does have an improvement. Perhaps he was too busy doing one handed core exercises with his pot noodle and playboy.

    That one says, basically, it makes you feel better but has no effect on muscle function. In many ways, not dissimilar to those one handed core exercises you mention.
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    edited May 2012
    You're on your own on this one Tucker. I am a BIG proponent of sports massage for preventative and remedial reasons.

    On what evidence? Other than that you're a remedial.
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    fish156 wrote:
    :lol: The world is just black and white, eh P_Tucker.

    In the interests of balance, here's a "research paper" supporting sports massage

    http://www.sportsmassagezone.co.uk/researchwork.pdf

    Compelling stuff. Most research shows it doesn't work, but LOTS OF ATHLETES USE IT AND HERES ONE STUDY THAT DOES.

    Science has a way of making things black and white, particularly when the overwhelming body of evidence supports one conclusion. But if anyone can show me something that proves the vast majority of research wrong, then I'm completely open to changing my mind.
  • Davey CDavey C Posts: 80
    P_Tucker wrote:
    d87heaven wrote:
    Quality research. One of the articles even mentions that it does have an improvement. Perhaps he was too busy doing one handed core exercises with his pot noodle and playboy.

    That one says, basically, it makes you feel better but has no effect on muscle function. In many ways, not dissimilar to those one handed core exercises you mention.

    This.
  • P_Tucker wrote:
    You're on your own on this one Tucker. I am a BIG proponent of sports massage for preventative and remedial reasons.

    On what evidence? Other than that you're a remedial.
    Anecdotal of course! :lol:
  • fish156fish156 Posts: 496
    Science tries to give answers to specific questions. The specific questions asked are unlikely to be "is any benefit of getting the odd massage here and there" *.

    To the OP, I'm an amatuer racer who spends their working life hunched over a keyboard. I have an occasional massage (typically once a month) and can give a little anecdotal feedback. Take it or leave it, your choice.

    After my first massage to relieve the tension in my back and shoulder muscles, I got back on the bike and felt the bars were too high, so I removed the 5mm spacer under the stem. I guess I may be more aero, and may even have improved TT times due to it, but I look cooler which even P_Tucker will agree is the main thing.

    After a massage I usually tend to come out with a positive mental attitude and I find that really commit to my subsequent training session. Not sure how long this lasts for though.


    [* Admittedly I'm plain lazy and haven't really looked that hard, so the research may be out there, as yet undiscovered by me.]
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    fish156 wrote:
    Science tries to give answers to specific questions. The specific questions asked are unlikely to be "is any benefit of getting the odd massage here and there" *.

    True. The question answered is "do sports massages work at all?". The answer is apparently not.
  • d87heavend87heaven Posts: 348
    What is your definition of 'work' ?
    Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals! Except the weasel
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    d87heaven wrote:
    What is your definition of 'work' ?

    Do what they're said to do; aid physical recovery as evidenced by (for example) better performance following the massage (vs not having a massage).

    Out of interest, why do lots of people really, and I mean REALLY, hate it when some kindly person such as myself offers evidence that may save them time and/or money on products/services that are little better than snake oil? You'd think people would be more grateful.
  • d87heavend87heaven Posts: 348
    Maybe its pure jealousy of your dazziling personality?
    Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals! Except the weasel
  • ShutUpLegsShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    P_Tucker wrote:
    Out of interest, why do lots of people really, and I mean REALLY, hate it when some kindly person such as myself offers evidence that may save them time and/or money on products/services that are little better than snake oil?

    Snake oil doesn't work :!: :?:
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    d87heaven wrote:
    Maybe its pure jealousy of your dazziling personality?

    Either that, or perhaps its because I know the difference between jealousy and envy.

    Anyway, I'm going to claim this one as another victory. Hurrah for science!
  • d87heavend87heaven Posts: 348
    Ok i'll continue to feed the troll.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 173226.htm
    Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals! Except the weasel
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    d87heaven wrote:
    He said that surprisingly the research proved one oft-repeated idea false: massage did not help clear lactic acid from tired muscles.

    But it helps with pain (which we've already established) and the results "hint" that massage "may" help with some other things. That's it, I'm phoning science right now and telling it to RIP UP the everything we thought we knew about sports massage.

    Still, well done on bitterly trying to prove me wrong. At least you're doing some research instead of mindlessly believing any old sh!t like the vast majority of people. I really feel like I've made a difference.
  • d87heavend87heaven Posts: 348
    Where did I claim it removes lactic acid?
    The original question was one of massage. You claimed it didnt work. Now you are saying you agree it does. Please make your mind up.
    Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals! Except the weasel
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,026
    From my own recent experience, my right calf flared up after a road race and became slightly swollen.
    I borrowed one the hard foam rollers and used that for a couple of times. Not being able to source a good soigneur or afford the Belgian's fees, the roller actually seemed to help and perhaps the swelling went down quicker than if I had left it. But it is all subjective imo.
    i 've had no repetition but I still only use the roller on occasion not as routine.
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    d87heaven wrote:
    Where did I claim it removes lactic acid?
    The original question was one of massage. You claimed it didnt work. Now you are saying you agree it does. Please make your mind up.

    Where did I say you did?

    To be clear, I say it doesn't work. The major claim of sports massage is that it improves recovery. The majority of scientific research says it doesn't. Finding one study which says it might possibly help relieve pain a bit (but further research required), from the totally real sounding McMaster University, changes nothing. Do try to keep up, its really not very difficult.
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