Forum home Road cycling forum Training, fitness and health

12 Hour TT Training and Tips

ProssPross Posts: 23,936
I'm seriously thinking about giving the Welsh 12 hour champs a go in September and was wondering if anyone has any advice / experience to pass on for training and nutrition? My aim is pretty modest (firstly to finish and secondly to clock up 200 miles). I was looking at building my rides gradually through the summer to a point where I am riding 75% of the distance (150 miles) at slightly above my intended average speed a couple of weeks before the event. I'm currently doing about 60 most Sundays but know I can manage 100 and I have previously completed a 100 mile TT in 5 hours 20 minutes, albeit a long time ago, which I think should translate to 200 being achievable in 12 hours. I would be riding the race on a standard road bike with clip on bars.

On the feeding front, my sister lives 100m from the main loop so I'm hoping to get some support. I'll carry a few gels and bars in my jersey for the first 60 miles and for emergencies but will hopefully get a chance to have some 'proper' food on the main circuit. Does anyone have any suggestions for savory foods that are easily digested and can be eaten on the move whilst giving a decent amount of energy (I suspect I'll be sick of sweet stuff!).

Cheers.

Posts

  • Peanuts were a life saver last time I did the 12 and was sick of sweet stuff, palatable lots of energy and easy to snack on. I think unless you are used to alot of gels/bars/energy drinks then real food is a must at some point. Last time I had a few hours where I couldn't stomach energy drink and was on plain water so an alternative energy source was needed! The welsh 12 is a great event, personally I think 150 mile rides will take too much out of the body and prevent you from being able to train effectively the rest of the week, I would advise to stick to 100 miles and try and make up the lost mileage in the rest of the week.

    With the race itself you will go through a bad patch inevitably, even the guys who win them will admit to this so just plug away and be reassured you will come out the other side feeling like you have a new pair of legs.

    I'm sure if Jeff sees this (current 12 Hr comp. record holder) he will have much more advice for you, but something an older rider told me once which is very true; The first six hours are in the legs, the second six are in the head!

    Good luck and I might see you there in September.

    mike
  • SurfrSurfr Posts: 243
    Bigest ride I did before the welsh 12 last year (my fist ever open TT) was the Dragon Ride grand fondo 120 mile route. Managed 200 miles on the day on a road bike with clipons and with 90 minutes off the bike with saddle pains. get comfortable on the bike and I reckon anyone can go all day at the right pace.

    See you in September :) Oh and I asked smilar questions before my Welsh 12 last year. Theres a thread still o nthe front page of this forum...

    viewtopic.php?f=40041&t=12781445
  • danowatdanowat Posts: 2,877
    I am doing my first 12hr in August, and so far, I've gained a lot of information by speaking to people who've completed 12's before, however, it is suprising at how different peoples experiances are, however, the biggest tip (and this is echo'd through everyone I've spoken too) I've got so far is make sure your support is up to it, it can be the difference between a good 12hr and a bad 12hr.
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    Never ridden one, dont have a clue etc. but I'd say make sure you're as aerodynamic as possible, as over the course of 12hours I'd say this would make a big difference?
  • Tom DeanTom Dean Posts: 1,723
    styxd wrote:
    Never ridden one, dont have a clue etc. but I'd say make sure you're as aerodynamic as possible, as over the course of 12hours I'd say this would make a big difference?

    No experience here either! but - I would make sure to be comfortable first. Of course there is a trade off between comfort and aero, I wouldn't want to compromise much on comfort in a 12hr.
  • ProssPross Posts: 23,936
    Cheers all. By riding a road bike with clip ons I hope to give myself as many position options as possible to balance comfort and aerodynamics.

    Surfr, I've seen your thread - in fact you are partly to blame for my lapse of reason in considering this (along with watching John Bishop last week!) ;)

    Hopefully support won't be a problem. I'll get all my family over to my sister's house which is about 200m from the circuit. The biggest problem will be avoiding the temptation to stop off for a full meal and soak in the bath :)

    I did read Jeff's article about his first 12. Hopefully he'll have some tips even though I'm at the opposite end of the spectrum and just looking to finish (and hopefully crack 200 miles) rather than trying to win. Whichever way it should be the longest ride I've done by a considerable amount.
  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    If you can't do without savoury foods for 12 hrs then have plenty the day before and a good meal after. When on a 12hr you need to shovel minimum amounts of food down you that's going to do you some good. For a start any food in your stomach will take blood away from your working muscles. They will work fine without the food. It's loads of fluid energy drinks you'll need. Have different flavours passed up. Some may even not agree with you on the ride so always have another to change to. Some sort of soup may work.
    If you are going to have plenty of help could I ask you to have spare fluid available for the odd rider who has in need of a drink. I had problems with fluid during a 12 and it was other peoples helpers who gave me water. I was so grateful.
    I have done plenty of long rides and found out the hard way about fluid. It is more important than food. Drink plenty before eating because it drains from the stomach very quickly, then eat. Food first, sits in the stomach and a small drop of fluid will fill you up and restrict the fluid from getting absorbed. Obviously, when you're down the pub having a pie & a pint it doesn't matter. One other thing is if you don't stop for a pee you could well be dehydrated.
    ...................................................................................................

    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
  • sub55sub55 Posts: 1,025
    How To Ride
    A 12 Hour Time Trial.
    interesting read

    http://www.abcc.co.uk/abccArticle.aspx?id=467
    constantly reavalueating the situation and altering the perceived parameters accordingly
  • sub55sub55 Posts: 1,025
    Peanuts were a life saver last time I did the 12 and was sick of sweet stuff, palatable lots of energy and easy to snack on. I think unless you are used to alot of gels/bars/energy drinks then real food is a must at some point. Last time I had a few hours where I couldn't stomach energy drink and was on plain water so an alternative energy source was needed! The welsh 12 is a great event, personally I think 150 mile rides will take too much out of the body and prevent you from being able to train effectively the rest of the week, I would advise to stick to 100 miles and try and make up the lost mileage in the rest of the week.

    With the race itself you will go through a bad patch inevitably, even the guys who win them will admit to this so just plug away and be reassured you will come out the other side feeling like you have a new pair of legs.

    I'm sure if Jeff sees this (current 12 Hr comp. record holder) he will have much more advice for you, but something an older rider told me once which is very true; The first six hours are in the legs, the second six are in the head!

    Good luck and I might see you there in September.

    mike


    sounds like steve edwards to me
    constantly reavalueating the situation and altering the perceived parameters accordingly
  • SBezzaSBezza Posts: 2,173
    I would suggest spending time in the saddle prior to the event, there is a huge difference to spending 3 or 4 hours in the saddle compared with 12. Make sure you are as comfortable as possible first and foremost, and make sure you do not go off too hard, it will come back to bite you massively.

    Doing 100+ mile rides will help in the long term, and if possible try doing them on back to back days during the build up. The more you ride longer distances the easier they become to recover from.

    As for food, just have a big selection of different types available, your preference to certain foods is quite likely to change during the event. As mentioned above it is quite easy to get sick of sweet stuff and can make you feel quite queasy if taken over a long period.
Sign In or Register to comment.