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First time fitness plan

PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
edited February 2012 in Health, fitness & training
A little bit about me...

Im 29 (soon) and 5' 11" and i would say average build... and a family man (6)

Ive done many jobs which involved sitting down next to or near vending machines
and done a few years of driving which involved many stops at forecourts...
so you can guess my diet hasnt been the best... and when at home i do seem to skip dinner and late at night i will in front of the telly with a cup of tea and some biscuits... but i do eat a little fruit.

I do a fair bit of walking and cycle quite a bit but it hasnt been enough as i should be doing.

So now... well for some time... i have a belly im unhappy with, and when out on my rides i quickly get tired.

Being a family man with kids of all ages there isnt a minute during the day when i could possibly go down to the gym.

So what would be a good thing for me to start eating that would replace my sugary rush and also give me stamina when out on rides... also what exercises could i do round the house that would benefit me just as much as going the gym.
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  • I think that them most important thing you can do is sort your diet out. I was in a similar situation and have lost 40lbs since last August.

    I was a snacker and didn't realise how much I ate until I kept a food diary, I would recomment this as it really helps you see where your problems are.

    The best thing would be to take a packlunch to work with your lunch some healthy snacks to get you through the day.

    How about trying to only take cash in note form to try and avoid the vending machine.

    Hope some of this helps?
  • PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
    Im a snacker too if i come to think of it... if i feel like a nibble we have plenty of stuff in the fridge to make a decent sandwich ut no get cake bars and maybe not just two.
    Burgatron wrote:
    I kept a food diary

    How long did you do it for?

    And once you started your change what sort of foods did you go onto?
  • RushmoreRushmore Posts: 674
    +1 for food diary / calorie counting...

    I have now stopped snacking on censored ....

    Ate reduced fat stuff and replaced heavy fatty food with more veg to compensate for hunger...

    Havn't changed much else...

    Lost over a stone in just over 5 weeks....

    oh and ride more... :P
    Always remember.... Wherever you go, there you are.

    Ghost AMR 7500 2012
    De Rosa R838
  • PaulC7 wrote:
    Im a snacker too if i come to think of it... if i feel like a nibble we have plenty of stuff in the fridge to make a decent sandwich ut no get cake bars and maybe not just two.
    Burgatron wrote:
    I kept a food diary

    How long did you do it for?

    And once you started your change what sort of foods did you go onto?

    I've kept it since Monday the 17th 2011. I now eat a lot less. my first day came in at 3063 cals and yesterday came in at 2,200.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    PaulC7 wrote:
    So now... well for some time... i have a belly im unhappy with, and when out on my rides i quickly get tired.

    Being a family man with kids of all ages there isnt a minute during the day when i could possibly go down to the gym.

    So what would be a good thing for me to start eating that would replace my sugary rush and also give me stamina when out on rides... also what exercises could i do round the house that would benefit me just as much as going the gym.

    What are you eating currently? quick generic breakdown :P It sounds like you are spiking your blood sugar levels a lot which won't help at all.

    Exercises around the house: kettlebell - resistance bands - buy weights? - bodyweight exercise
  • PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
    I most always have breakfast of a morning... usually cereal with sugar sometimes might treat myself to a fry up, if im in a rush then i skip on it.

    During the afternoon dont eat properly most times will grab a butty occasionally but thats usually follwowed by biscuits, cake not large quantities.

    Tea time is usual unhealthy stuff waffles, cheese, beans, sausages, spaghetti bolognese ready meals, pizzas, kebabs, curries.

    As for drinking through the day i have tea with sugar, milk, fruit juice or flavoured water i dont drink hardly any fizzy stuff.


    But... When out and about for the day... my diet changes... i eat pastas, salads, fruit and so on which i find more enjoyable.


    One exercise i would like to do is for my lower back i have a real problem with that after a ride... a google search brings up some but would like to know if anyone does back exercises and benefits from them.
  • mcnultycopmcnultycop Posts: 2,143
    I'm on a weight loss drive and am doing weights 3-4 times a week (big compound moves mainly, based on the stronglifts.com 5x5 workout) and at least one trip out on my bike a week. The squats that form the foundation of this routine have really strengthened my anterior chain and I'd recommend them to everyone.

    Whilst my diet is a million miles away from perfect I've been basing all my meals around protein and veg and cutting right down on the white carbs. I've lost about 4 stone since last May at a sensible steady rate and am a lot stronger and have miles better cardiovascular fitness. Bringing lunches to work and leaving cash at home stops impromtu spending on snacks. I make 5 lunches on a Sunday night of roasted chicken breast and mixed vegetables and microwave these at work; they work out cheaper than a supermarket sandwich, are healthier and mean you don't walk past the Twix aisle before you pay for your sandwich.

    As mentioned before the stuff you are eating will spike the insulin levels making you feel hungrier sooner. A good rule is not to eat anything that comes out of a box; i.e. only eat things humans were eating 2000 years ago.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    PaulC7 wrote:
    I most always have breakfast of a morning... usually cereal with sugar sometimes might treat myself to a fry up, if im in a rush then i skip on it.
    Sugar on breakfast (if you have any) so you crash by 10am and do what? Grab more sugary goodness? Have a look at your boxes of frosties and whatever else,then compare to porridge,shredded wheat or weetabix,3 unprocessed cereals. Frosties and corn flakes don't grow in flakes..

    Why are you treating yourself to fry-ups? I'm pretty confident it's not because you've earned it.
    During the afternoon dont eat properly most times will grab a butty occasionally but thats usually follwowed by biscuits, cake not large quantities.
    You want to lose weight yet you continue to stuff censored into yourself?
    Tea time is usual unhealthy stuff waffles, cheese, beans, sausages, spaghetti bolognese ready meals, pizzas, kebabs, curries.
    Are your kids eating this censored too?
    As for drinking through the day i have tea with sugar, milk, fruit juice or flavoured water i dont drink hardly any fizzy stuff.
    Thats about the best part of your day,unless you take 6 spoons. Why not just plain old water??
    But... When out and about for the day... my diet changes... i eat pastas, salads, fruit and so on which i find more enjoyable.
    Why not do this all the time?
    One exercise i would like to do is for my lower back i have a real problem with that after a ride... a google search brings up some but would like to know if anyone does back exercises and benefits from them.
    What kind of problem? Lower back pain can be worsened by incorrect bike positioning,are you sure it isn't this?

    I admire people to admit to wanting or needing help and advice,I was there once myself. But damn dude,a little effort to help yourself would go a long way.
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    You're fat because you eat shite food and too much of it. Your diet is made up of processed foods, there doesnt seem to be anything natural in it. Its not hard FFS, I mean it even tells you your daily allowances on the packets of everything you eat. MTFU and do a bit of reading, educate yourself FFS. Your kids will benefit from it aswell.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    styxd wrote:
    You're fat because you eat shite food and too much of it. Your diet is made up of processed foods, there doesnt seem to be anything natural in it. Its not hard FFS, I mean it even tells you your daily allowances on the packets of everything you eat. MTFU and do a bit of reading, educate yourself FFS. Your kids will benefit from it aswell.

    I worked really hard to restrain myself from saying just this,although perhaps a tad sharper :)

    Packaging RDA's are based on the average UK male, not applicable to everyone :P
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    I think you're reply is a bit better written than mine!

    I know the RDA's are just a guide line, but if you're eating the sort of shite the OP does, then they're probably a good place to start!
  • PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
    The food i eat is just what im used too as i was brought up on it... and ive never had a problem with it as i dont go jogging, do sports which need me to be fit and so on... but neither am i a couch potato however i do understand no matter what i do my body wont change unless my diet changes.

    Its only now that im getting out on my bike more for longer and want to start doing some downhill that ive realized just how unfit i am and the time to make that change is now.

    The first stop obviously is cut the sugar but no doubt i will have cravings so what good stuff should i replace it with... is replacing the sugar a good thing or should i ignore the cravings and wait for my next meal.

    Do you folks stick to three meals a day or do you snack on good stuff throughout in between... i know the questions i am/will ask may be simple to you but its easy to say dont eat fatty foods and sugar the hard part is finding out what foods are best in general, what will help with stamina, what foods release energy slowly and so on and also how to base my diet around them and my

    Google helps a bit but as always the results vary so much and i would like to know from those on here who are doing it right and can say it works and helps.

    As for my kids i have to say they have a healthier diet than me, they have breakfast... porridge alot of the time... they have their packed lunches in school and when they home they have unhealthy sweets/crisps but only a small amount they also eat more vegetables and fruit than i do... and no doubt get more exercise with play time in school and when out playing running around with other kids at home.


    In relation to my lower back if i stand for a long time it starts to hurt almost like a cramp, of a morning when i wake up and stretch my back is the same... but i dont have any issues when riding its afterwards once im off it and recovering you could say.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    edited February 2012
    PaulC7 wrote:
    The food i eat is just what im used too as i was brought up on it... and ive never had a problem with it as i dont go jogging, do sports which need me to be fit and so on... but neither am i a couch potato however i do understand no matter what i do my body wont change unless my diet changes.
    Cycling very much requires a level of fitness,but you can't fuel exercise with sugar and bad diet.
    The first stop obviously is cut the sugar but no doubt i will have cravings so what good stuff should i replace it with... is replacing the sugar a good thing or should i ignore the cravings and wait for my next meal.
    Nope. The first step is BMR http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

    multiply it by your level
    To determine your total daily calorie needs, multiply your BMR by the appropriate activity factor, as follows:

    If you are sedentary (little or no exercise) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.2
    If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.375
    If you are moderatetely active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.55
    If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.725
    If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.9
    -500.
    Do you folks stick to three meals a day or do you snack on good stuff throughout in between... i know the questions i am/will ask may be simple to you but its easy to say dont eat fatty foods and sugar the hard part is finding out what foods are best in general, what will help with stamina, what foods release energy slowly and so on and also how to base my diet around them and my
    The best foods in general look the same if not close to how it did when it was growing. ie: a cornflake doesn't grow in a flake shape.White sugar isn't white to begin with, white flour is bleached white. If you can't go to Tescos and get a general idea of what is and isn't "censored " you aren't ready to diet.
    As for my kids i have to say they have a healthier diet than me, they have breakfast... porridge alot of the time... they have their packed lunches in school and when they home they have unhealthy sweets/crisps but only a small amount they also eat more vegetables and fruit than i do... and no doubt get more exercise with play time in school and when out playing running around with other kids at home.
    Do them a favour too eh? Low GI carbs (porridge is a great start to a day) give you energy over time (hours) unlike sugar which can be minutes, Proteins help you feel full,fruits are full of fibre and natural sugars.

    I lived on coffee and censored for years,at the peak of my weightloss stupdity I was eating Nutrigrain bars for breakfast and nothing else. Barely consuming enough calories to live,nevermind work or exercise. I wised up and started paying attention because I wasn't losing weight like that and was never going to. Now I never sugar crash,always have energy,sleep like a corpse and eat more than I ever did. I too trawled google,but I found the answers in the kitchen. Reading labels is highly insightful and learning how to cook made a world of difference. I'm not great at it,but for 95% of my meals (2200 - 2600cals a day),I know exactly whats in them which counts for a lot.

    Borrowed from another forum.
    An A is the highest grade a food can receive. To earn an A grade, a food must be 100% natural (not refined or processed in any way). A-grade foods must also be extremely nutrient dense. These top-of-the line “super-foods” are packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, carotenoids, phytochemicals, essential fatty acids, fiber and other healthy stuff that’s extremely good for you.

    For example, red peppers are the only food with an entire days worth of vitamin C. Tomatoes contain cancer-fighting lycopene. Spinach is rich in calcium and vitamin D. Orange veggies like carrots, sweet potatoes, and butternut squash are packed with carotenoids. Asparagus is loaded with vitamin K. Deep leafy greens like spinach are nutritional powerhouses with ample quantities of Vitamin K, Carotenoids, Calcium, Iron, Potassium and Vitamin C. All fibrous carbs, green veggies and salad veggies get an A grade. Fibrous carbohydrates, (green veggies and salad veggies) would even quality for an A+ because they have extremely high nutrient density with extremely low calorie density, making them ideal foods for reducing body fat.

    Some dieters are afraid of starchy carbohydrates because they’ve been led to believe they are fattening. However, starchy carbs are not fattening or unhealthy, refined carbs and other man made foods are the real culprits. The A-grade starchy carbohydrates like yams, brown rice and old fashioned unsweetened oatmeal are staples for athletes, bodybuilders and fitness buffs. Other A-grade starches include black eye peas, lentils, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo) and barley. It’s true that some people are carb sensitive, but don’t fall for the “all carbs are fattening” myth. Fat loss is all about calories in versus calories out and the type of carbs you eat…

    The A grade starchy carbs are 100% natural, eaten almost exactly the way they come out of the ground. Most of these starches (with the exception of white potatoes and carrots) are also either low on the glycemic index or they have a nice balance between carbohydrate and protein, which causes them to be released slowly into the bloodstream as glucose. Even on strict bodybuilding or fitness competition diets, these are the carbs of choice for physique improvement.

    Fruits, although they are considered a “simple carb” (fructose), are also on the A-list because they are natural and high in nutritional value. Fat burning nutrition isn’t as black and white as complex carbs and simple carbs. Simple versus complex is one consideration, but the far more important selection criteria is whether a food is refined or natural. Some bodybuilding guru’s even believe that “fruit is fattening.” For very strict fat loss diets for bodybuilding and fitness competition or on low carb diets for the hypoglycemic and insulin resistant, fruit is sometimes temporarily reduced or even removed. However, for overall health, fitness and body composition improvement, fruit should almost always be one of your top picks.

    Rounding out the A-grade food category are A-grade proteins, which are the LEAN, complete proteins (those containing all the essential amino acids) and the A grade fats, which are those high in omega-3’s and other healthy essential fatty acids. Foods such as Salmon, which are high in protein and heart healthy Omega three fats could even be graded as an A+!

    A-grade fibrous carbs

    Spinach
    Kale
    Broccoli
    Cauliflower
    Brussel sprouts
    Green Beans
    Asparagus
    Collard greens
    Green and red peppers
    Mushrooms
    Tomatoes
    Onions
    Cucumbers
    All other fibrous carbs, green vegetables or salad vegetables

    A-grade starchy carbs

    Yams
    Sweet potatoes
    Barley
    Oatmeal (Old fashioned unsweetened)
    Beans, all types
    Black eye peas
    Slow cooked brown rice (long grain/basmati)
    Lentils
    White potatoes Red potatoes
    Carrots
    A-grade simple carbs
    All fresh fruits (not including canned, sweetened, or juice)

    A-grade fats

    Flaxseed oil
    Udo’s Choice essential oil blend
    Fish Oil
    Fatty fish (salmon, trout, herring, sardines)

    A-grade proteins

    Chicken breast
    Turkey breast
    Extra lean ground turkey
    Ostrich
    Buffalo/Bison/lean game meats
    Fish, all types
    Shellfish
    Egg whites
    Non fat cottage cheese
    Top round steak (leanest cut of red meat)
    Protein powder supplements (whey, casein, or combination)

    B-Grade Foods

    A “B” is a good grade. Not the best grade, but a “good” grade nonetheless. Physique athletes (bodybuilders and fitness competitors) often drop out B grade foods prior to competitions, opting for 100% A-grade choices. This makes the diet much more restrictive.

    If you’re a perfectionist, you might strive for “straight A’s,” and that’s fine. But keep in mind that it’s not only okay for you to eat some B grade foods most of the year, it might actually be a good thing because it makes your diet much easier to maintain. Adherence to your nutrition program is much easier when you give yourself more options. On the other hand, if you are preparing for a physique competition or you’re on a “peaking” phase, then you should “tighten up” your diet and get as many A-grade foods as possible.

    There are many good B grade foods to choose from. Allowing products that are 100% whole grain, yet slightly processed (whole wheat bread, cereal or pasta, for example), opens up a whole new world of options and adds great variety to your diet. Why doesn’t whole wheat bread get an “A?” The only reason whole wheat bread doesn’t get an A is because it is processed. Although it may be whole grain, a loaf of bread doesn’t grow on a tree does it? It’s unsweetened (except for a tiny amount of corn syrup) but it is slightly processed. An all-natural food is one you eat in the same form that it came from in nature.

    B-grade proteins include those which are still low in fat, but are not as lean as their A-grade counterparts. For example, flank steak is great, but not as lean as top round steak, so the top round gets an A and the flank gets a B.

    B-grade Carbohydrates

    100% whole grain, unsweetened boxed cereals 100% whole grain cooked cereals 100% whole grain pastas (amaranth, quinoa, wheat, etc) 100% whole grain breads (100% whole wheat, rye, spelt, etc) 100% Whole wheat pitas
    100% Whole grain, unsweetened muffins
    Quick brown rice
    Quick oatmeal (unsweetened)

    B-grade Proteins & dairy products

    Flank steak
    Extra Lean top sirloin
    Extra lean ground beef
    Extra lean red meats, other
    Lowfat ground turkey
    Non fat or 1% low fat sour cream
    Non fat or 1% low fat cheese
    Non fat or 1% low fat cream cheese
    Nonfat or 1% low fat, sugar free yogurt
    1% low fat cottage cheese
    Whole eggs (1 whole egg per 5-6 whites is a good ratio)
    B-grade Fats
    Extra virgin olive oil & olive oil salad dressings
    Natural peanut butter
    Olives
    Avocado
    Nuts & seeds
    Reduced fat, reduced calorie salad dressings

    C-Grade Foods

    A “C” is an average grade; not poor, not failing, but not good either. If most of your diet consists of “C” grade foods, your results will be average…not poor…not absent….but not good either. Breakfasts cereals like Cheerios are C list foods.
    Most boxed cereals such as Cheerios only get a C because even though they’re made from whole grain oats, they’re sweetened with white sugar. If you go to a health food store you can often find generic brand Cheerios (usually called “oat o’s or “Oat circles, etc.) This would bump the grade up to a B. Any cereal sweetened with refined sugar automatically gets bumped down to a C. If the cereal is mostly sugar (think “Fruit Loops” or “Sugar Smacks”) it gets a D or an F.

    C-grade carbohydrates are those which are processed or sweetened slightly, but most of them are still made from a whole grain. Starches that are processed (white rice) also get C’s because even though they are complex carbohydrates, they are rapidly absorbed and stripped of much of their original nutritional value. C-grade carbohydrates also include very calorie dense carbs, like fruit juice. Fruit juice is a fairly healthy food, but the high calorie density is not good when your goal is calorie control for a fat reducing diet.

    C-grade proteins are those which are moderate in fat content and relatively unprocessed. Very low fat lunch meats are C foods, but generally lunch meats are not good choices because they are processed foods (not real meat, but a meat “product.”)

    C-grade carbohydrates

    Grits
    Cream of rice
    Cream of wheat
    White rice Pasta made from enriched flour (durum semolina)
    Whole grain, low fat snack foods (pretzels, crackers, etc)
    Bagels
    Cheerios
    Sweetened and /or flavored oatmeal
    Raisin Bran cereal (wheat flakes, sweetened)
    Enriched wheat bread
    Unsweetened fruit juice

    C-grade proteins

    Turkey thighs or dark meat
    Chicken thighs
    Ground turkey
    Lean Sirloin steak
    Lean ground beef
    Lean red meats, other
    Very low fat sliced chicken breast (lunch meat)
    Very low fat sliced turkey breast (lunch meat)
    Very low fat sliced ham (lunch meat)
    Low fat ham or pork
    Low fat (2%) cheeses
    Low fat (2%) cream cheese
    Low fat (2%) cottage cheese
    Low fat (2%) sour cream
    Low fat (2%) unsweetened yogurt

    D-Grade Foods

    A “D” is a poor grade, no doubt about it. If you’re eating a lot of D-grade foods, your results will be poor for sure. Most D-grade foods are also bad for your health. D foods are those that are high in refined sugars or made primarily from bleached white flour. D-grade foods also include proteins that are moderately high in total fat and saturated fat and proteins that are highly processed and refined. You might think you’re doing well by eating “low fat hot dogs,” but refined meat products – even those low in fat – should not be a regular feature in your diet.

    High saturated fat content also lowers your grades. The role of saturated fat in disease is controversial, but at this time it still appears wise to keep your saturated fats low, regardless of what the “low carb gurus” are saying. High saturated fat foods are D’s and F’s. Also remember, fat and carbs together are a nasty combination. The lower your carbs, the more fat you can eat, but in this grading system (in the context of a low or moderate fat diet), foods high in get low grades (C or D).

    D-grade carbohydrates

    Sweetened boxed breakfast cereals with no whole grains
    Snack foods made from white flour (pretzels, crackers, etc.)
    Bleached, enriched white bread (i.e., “wonder bread”) or white bread products
    Muffins and baked goods made with white flour, sugar and or hydrogenated oils

    D-grade proteins & dairy products

    Low fat sliced chicken breast (lunch meat)
    Low fat sliced turkey breast (lunch meat)
    Low fat sausage
    Low fat ground beef
    Cream cheese, full fat
    Cottage cheese, full fat
    Sour cream, full fat
    Butter
    Cream, half and half
    High fat cuts of red meat
    Roast Beef
    Ham, pork
    Reduced fat beef jerky
    Reduced fat Hot dogs
    Reduced fat Sausage
    Reduced fat Bacon

    F-Grade Foods

    F foods are the foods you should almost never eat. And if you do ever eat them, it should be a rare occasion indeed (holidays, celebrations, once weekly “reward” meals, etc). These are the foods that not only spell disaster for your physique; they’re also horrible for your health. F-grade foods include the following categories: 1) foods containing trans fats, 2) foods high in saturated fats, 3) Highly processed or refined foods, 4) highly sweetened foods or foods that are pure sugar, 5) foods that are high in refined sugars and fats, 6) processed, high fat meats.

    Hydrogenated tropical oils (Palm oil, Palm kernel oil, Coconut oil)
    Hydrogenated vegetable oils
    Anything deep-fried
    Margarine
    Very high calorie and high fat cuts of pork
    Very high calorie and high fat cuts of red meat such as porterhouse and prime rib
    Foods made mostly of white sugar or other refined carbohydrates (corn syrup, etc)
    Candy
    Sweets
    Chocolate
    Cookies
    Soda (Coke, Pepsi, etc)
    Sugar Sweetened beverages
    Pastries and Baked goods high in both fats and sugars
    Pies
    Doughnuts
    Croissants
    Éclairs
    Cinnabons
    Cakes

    Foods high in both refined carbohydrates and saturated fat

    Fettuccine Alfredo
    Potato chips
    Hot Dogs on white bun
    Fast food hamburgers on white buns (even worse with cheese, bacon)
    Sweetened peanut butter
    Chocolate milk (full fat, whole milk)
    Meats that are processed and high in fat
    Sliced full fat ham (lunch meat)
    Sliced full fat turkey breast (lunch meat)
    Sliced full fat chicken breast (lunch meat)
    All other full fat luncheon meats and cold cuts
    Bologna
    Hot dogs
    Salami
    Beef jerky
    Beef sticks (“Slim Jim”)
    Sausage
    Bacon
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    If you want to get fit, just ride your bike lots (thats really all it boils down too)

    If you want to lose weight then eat healthy.

    Obviously they are related - i.e. if you ride your bike lots and eat healthly you will lose more weight.

    Cut out sugar, cut out processed foods. If you really need to eat sugar, eat fruit.

    Breakfast - Go for porridge like your kids do, rather than cereal/bread/fry ups

    Lunch - Lots vegetables & lean meat. With a bit of fruit if you feel the need

    Tea - Same as your lunch

    If you're cycling alot then add some proper carbs into your meals like pasta. Before you go cycling have a banana or similar perhaps.

    After cycling have some carbs & protein.

    Stick to eating 2000cals per day if you are cycling.

    I only eat 3/4 meals per day, I dont snack inbetween them cos I never have any food at work to snack on.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    styxd wrote:
    Stick to eating 2000cals per day if you are cycling.
    How can you pinpoint a number while knowing so little about the OP?
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    How can you pinpoint a number while knowing so little about the OP? 2000 could easily be 1000 too little even in deficit.

    Got to start somewhere. I know there are calculators that can work it out a bit better. But have a go at 2000 (or around that). If he doesnt lose weight then go for less, if he starts feeling weak and losing muscle then eat more I guess.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    styxd wrote:
    How can you pinpoint a number while knowing so little about the OP? 2000 could easily be 1000 too little even in deficit.

    Got to start somewhere. I know there are calculators that can work it out a bit better. But have a go at 2000 (or around that). If he doesnt lose weight then go for less, if he starts feeling weak and losing muscle then eat more I guess.
    Yes you have to start somewhere,but when giving advice that someone elses health and wellbeing depends on,don't just pull a number out of your censored . That's wreckless and dangerous.........

    I posted it above. BMR x activity - deficit of 500 (to start) Starting low is never recommended due to plateaus. When you hit the stage when loss stops,the usual option is to reduce cals further. You can't reduce when you aren't consuming anything to reduce.
  • cameraukcamerauk Posts: 998
    what about seeing if someone could give a week food sheet to show what a good balanced meal for breakfast dinner and tea giving an idea of calories for each meal say to around 2000 calories a day
    This would maybe give him and me :) a base to work from
    Specialized Camber Expert
    Specialized Allez Sport
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    camerauk wrote:
    what about seeing if someone could give a week food sheet to show what a good balanced meal for breakfast dinner and tea giving an idea of calories for each meal say to around 2000 calories a day
    This would maybe give him and me :) a base to work from
    Good luck with that.
  • cameraukcamerauk Posts: 998
    camerauk wrote:
    what about seeing if someone could give a week food sheet to show what a good balanced meal for breakfast dinner and tea giving an idea of calories for each meal say to around 2000 calories a day
    This would maybe give him and me :) a base to work from
    Good luck with that.

    yeah I know it would be asking a lot

    maybe just what someone has had for one day would help
    Specialized Camber Expert
    Specialized Allez Sport
  • mcnultycopmcnultycop Posts: 2,143
    Mens Health (whilst gimmicky) has regular meal plans and similar in them. It's a reasonable start - their pullouts they have in usually have a decent planner in them. I've only got them in hard copy so can't include here. Try:
    http://www.menshealth.co.uk/food-nutrition/
  • PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
    Thanks... T.M.H.N.E.T... for the food grade list it helps understand alot.

    Just had a quick look on mens health... will read fully tomorrow, its not looking too bad just a case of finding the right combination that i will enjoy eating... will also put my cooking skills to the test as you know i dont do much.

    As for exercising it appears to be a little but often... i dont want to be a body builder or even have a six pack just generally stonger and fitter than what i am, i will be trying these exercises for my lower back will let you know how i get on and if they make a difference over the next week or two

    My BMR is 1742.38.
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    PaulC7 wrote:
    Thanks... T.M.H.N.E.T... for the food grade list it helps understand alot.

    Just had a quick look on mens health... will read fully tomorrow, its not looking too bad just a case of finding the right combination that i will enjoy eating... will also put my cooking skills to the test as you know i dont do much.

    As for exercising it appears to be a little but often... i dont want to be a body builder or even have a six pack just generally stonger and fitter than what i am, i will be trying these exercises for my lower back will let you know how i get on and if they make a difference over the next week or two

    My BMR is 1742.38.

    Did you do this?
    Harris Benedict Formula

    To determine your total daily calorie needs, multiply your BMR by the appropriate activity factor, as follows:

    If you are sedentary (little or no exercise) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.2
    If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.375
    If you are moderatetely active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.55
    If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.725
    If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.9
  • PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
    No i didnt multiply it...

    so going by me getting out on my bike at least 3 imes a week... so lightly active

    my new BMR is...2395.25
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    Looks like somewhere around 2000 might be the way to go then....
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    PaulC7 wrote:
    No i didnt multiply it...

    so going by me getting out on my bike at least 3 imes a week... so lightly active

    my new BMR is...2395.25
    That isn't really a lot to be taking a deficit off imo. I would play it safe and eat to 2400 for a few weeks initially,if it's getting results then stick with while it works.

    ps:2000 cals a day would kill me, my first breakfast of the day can be 800+ :D
  • cameraukcamerauk Posts: 998
    [/quote]

    ps:2000 cals a day would kill me, my first breakfast of the day can be 800+ :D[/quote]

    800 + what are you having lol
    My coffee and muesli comes in at about 300
    Takes a bit of getting used to but starting to enjoy it now
    just trying to get into the habit of not picking and if I do go for fruit
    Specialized Camber Expert
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  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265

    ps:2000 cals a day would kill me, my first breakfast of the day can be 800+ :D
    camerauk wrote:
    800 + what are you having lol
    My coffee and muesli comes in at about 300
    Takes a bit of getting used to but starting to enjoy it now
    just trying to get into the habit of not picking and if I do go for fruit

    100g(dry weight) porridge 250ml+milk + protein shake totals around 650-700 + I sometimes have eggs and/or wholegrain toast too. Otherwise the eggs/toast are second breakfast in work but it really depends on the day and what I'm doing.
  • RanklesRankles Posts: 144
    If I were you mate I'd check out Chris Carmichael's The Time Crunched Cyclist.

    It includes a background to fitness and nutrition and crucially involves a 6 hr a week training plan to get you fit on your bike - aimed mainly at people like yourself who have to put families and jobs before their training!

    The case studies are great and Carmichael's qualifications and track record are fantastic, I'm part way into it and I can already see huge improvement.
  • PaulC7PaulC7 Posts: 112
    Judging by the reviews it sounds one too have, but the reviews dont give too much away.

    Can you share a little bit about what the book gets you doing and how the 6 hours training is a help
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