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Wich all mountain bike?

Glyn RichardsGlyn Richards Posts: 9
edited January 2012 in MTB buying advice
I am going to build my spech enduro into a new frame.I will use it for all my riding wich usually is climbing up double track to find something steep and knarly to come down as fast as poss.I also do 3 alps trips a year.The most important thing is how it decends rather than climb.My enduro has 36vans.I have narowed it down to a few frames.
Ibis mojo hd carbon
Santa cruz nomad carbon
Yeti sb 66
or maybe just buy another Enduro.
Has anyone got any thoughts that would help me to decide.
Many thanks,Glyn
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  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    Maybe I'm a bit slow, but why would you build the bits of your current Enduro into another Enduro???

    But your main deciding factor is what from your old bike will fit on the new frame.
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  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    For the sort of riding you describe, which is pretty much all I do. A Giant Reign X would be spot on for you, climbs extremely well & descends like a mini downhill bike. Mine weighs 31lb and I can still confidently launch it off big jumps & drops and it's more than up to the job for uplift days.
  • bluechair84bluechair84 Posts: 4,352
    Or there is the Enduro evo, which is slacker and more gravity orientated. Isn't the Mojo still a bit trail for what you're describing? If the Enduro isn't man enough on the descents, then maybe you should be going light FR bike like a Slash? I've just picked up a Canyon Torque frame - 170mm travel and some 170 Lyriks for my light FR bike.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Nomad Carbon, but I'm biased ;)
  • oodboooodboo Posts: 2,171
    Another enduro. That's if you've got the old one and want the new one. I've got a 2010 enduro and been thinking about doing something similar. I like the look of the Ragley G6 frame and I'm quite hooked on the idea of mismatched travel to improve climbing without sacrificing descending too much.
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  • dan45adan45a Posts: 143
    Glyn, Of your 3 choices I would say the yeti and the Ibis are less capable descending than your enduro. Carbon Nomad is a good one though.

    But if you are doing a frame build and want something speacial a Nicolai helius AM is worth a look. I've ridden against these in XC marathons to the Megavalanche. Very capable bikes. I think its in the Dirt 100 this year as well....
  • lawmanlawman Posts: 6,868
    would have to say the mojo, but then i am biased :lol:

    as for whether the nomad descends better dan, whats your argument? geometry is pretty much identical, same travel, similar wheelbase, and the mojo is just as stiff if not stiffer... the mojo is also abit cheaper than a nomad carbon too, so you could always add an angleset and it'll still be cheaper.
  • dan45adan45a Posts: 143
    No technical argument just personal experience. Took the ibis for a day at lake Tahoe and quick and beautiful as it was it didnt fill me with confidence on the rocky desecents and I would say it was an overly technical trail, where as I tried a nomad at afan and thought it was really fast and stable. Agreed Nomad is very expensive.

    I have an alpine 160 and niether come close to that on the downs, it is a lump going up though ;)
  • cooldad wrote:
    Maybe I'm a bit slow, but why would you build the bits of your current Enduro into another Enduro???

    But your main deciding factor is what from your old bike will fit on the new frame.
    No,thought of just buying a complete new enduro,my 07 has been a great bike
  • For the sort of riding you describe, which is pretty much all I do. A Giant Reign X would be spot on for you, climbs extremely well & descends like a mini downhill bike. Mine weighs 31lb and I can still confidently launch it off big jumps & drops and it's more than up to the job for uplift days.
    Thanks Rockmonkey,will check one out
  • Or there is the Enduro evo, which is slacker and more gravity orientated. Isn't the Mojo still a bit trail for what you're describing? If the Enduro isn't man enough on the descents, then maybe you should be going light FR bike like a Slash? I've just picked up a Canyon Torque frame - 170mm travel and some 170 Lyriks for my light FR bike.
    my 07 enduro was fine descending,would the new evo or a nomad be as capable or better?
  • dan45a wrote:
    Glyn, Of your 3 choices I would say the yeti and the Ibis are less capable descending than your enduro. Carbon Nomad is a good one though.

    But if you are doing a frame build and want something speacial a Nicolai helius AM is worth a look. I've ridden against these in XC marathons to the Megavalanche. Very capable bikes. I think its in the Dirt 100 this year as well....
    Cheers Dan. Defo don't wan't anything less capable downhill than my 07 enduro,how would a new enduro or a carbon nomad compare to it on decents?
  • dan45adan45a Posts: 143
    Glyn, I've not had much time riding an enduro but my mate has an evo which he loves and uses for trail riding and uplift days. My other mate has a nicolai helius with a ccdb fitted, that is rapid. Either in my opinion would fit your bill.

    Bike scene have 2011 enduro experts for £2.5k which is pretty good value for the spec you get. Very good do it all bike!

    I'd test some out at a demo day see how they feel to you. There is lots of choice out there, enjoy making up your mind :)
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    At that price - demo definitely! Demo days or a local LBS that will let you demo it on some good local trails if you have any.
  • DodgeTDodgeT Posts: 2,255
    I've got a 2011 enduro expert and can't recommend it enough, it really does do everything well.
    It's fast everywhere, especially going down :lol:
    My mates who have rode it love it too.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    One problem with the Enduro is it's very difficult to fit a coil shock without spending a shed load of cash. Enduro Evo looks good though
  • DodgeTDodgeT Posts: 2,255
    /\ /\ how come, frame looks the same? And what would be the big advantage?
  • oodboooodboo Posts: 2,171
    Not sure of all the ins and outs but you need to buy an evo link to replace the existing one and I think the evo link comes with a shock as it's not a standard size.
    I love horses, best of all the animals. I love horses, they're my friends.

    Strava
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 49,314
    Since the best bike in the world is one that you own, I'd say get a Lapierre Spicy ;-)
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • dan45a wrote:
    Glyn, I've not had much time riding an enduro but my mate has an evo which he loves and uses for trail riding and uplift days. My other mate has a nicolai helius with a ccdb fitted, that is rapid. Either in my opinion would fit your bill.

    Bike scene have 2011 enduro experts for £2.5k which is pretty good value for the spec you get. Very good do it all bike!

    I'd test some out at a demo day see how they feel to you. There is lots of choice out there, enjoy making up your mind :)
    Thank's Dan,very helpfull.Youre right,so many good bikes around these days.Looks like it could be a new Enduro!
  • DodgeT wrote:
    I've got a 2011 enduro expert and can't recommend it enough, it really does do everything well.
    It's fast everywhere, especially going down :lol:
    My mates who have rode it love it too.
    Thank's DodgeT,any idea what changes they have made from 2011 bike to evo,presumably the evo is a better bike?
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    They just don't fit in the space in the frame. Coil shocks give much better damping performance than air shocks which makes a real difference on a long travel frame. They also don't overheat as badly as air shocks on long alpine descents.
  • DodgeTDodgeT Posts: 2,255
    @ glyn - no expert on this (mind the pun :) ) but think the forks have 10mm more travel which slackens the angles by 0.2 - 0.5deg and obviously the coil shock at the rear. There's prob a bit more to it.

    Where you based? You not got any mates with similar bikes to try?
  • 1mancity21mancity2 Posts: 2,355
    New one is slightly longer making to more stable going down, coil shock copes better with constant big hits, a rp2 or rp23 will cope with light FR/DH duties just depends how hard you land and how light you are over the narly stuff.
    Finished, Check out my custom Giant Reign 2010
    Dirt Jumper Dmr Sidekick2
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    When things get rough no air shock will match a good coil shock.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Good is the key. Remember, BSOs feature coil shocks!
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    Some are even worse than Manitou Swingers :-P
  • DodgeTDodgeT Posts: 2,255
    Would us mere mortals honestly notice a difference between a good air / good coil shock though, considering we're not racing against Danny Hart etc??
  • 1mancity21mancity2 Posts: 2,355
    DodgeT wrote:
    Would us mere mortals honestly notice a difference between a good air / good coil shock though, considering we're not racing against Danny Hart etc??

    On the DH stuff you will, the back end dosn't get bounced around the same.
    Finished, Check out my custom Giant Reign 2010
    Dirt Jumper Dmr Sidekick2
  • dan45adan45a Posts: 143
    Would us mere mortals honestly notice a difference between a good air / good coil shock though, considering we're not racing against Danny Hart etc??

    I must say yes, when I went to a CCDB coil shock on my alpine160 the difference over the RP23 air can was massive! Particular on fast rocky sections, does loose speed. Even jumping is better? Could be the damping settings?
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