Forum home Road cycling forum Tours, routes, audaxes & organised rides Sportives/audaxes/training rides

Is what I'm doing an Audax??

rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
I plot a route of my own using a photocopied map and sometimes my Garmin (if I can get it to work!) and set off with some food supplies and a toolkit in my saddlebag. I'm always on my own and get myself to and from the start/finish and stop for more substantial food when I see the chance.

What's the difference between this sort of ride and an audax? Other than I plot my own route?
«1

Posts

  • You need a route card to stamp :D
  • WooliferkinsWooliferkins Posts: 2,060
    Control points where your Brevet card is stamped to prove to the organisers you've done the route, £3 or £4 entry and fellow riders should you wish. Certificate and badge should you desire.
    Neil
    Help I'm Being Oppressed
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    Oh I know about all the official stuff. I'm just thinking I'll keep on plotting my own routes rather than bothering to join the Audax club etc etc.
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    What you're doing is commonly known as 'going for a bike ride'.
    More problems but still living....
  • shedmanshedman Posts: 26
    amaferanga wrote:
    What you're doing is commonly known as 'going for a bike ride'.
    :lol:
  • Hi - I spent the past three weeks cycling 2200 miles through the French countryside across a number of 'stages' that I created on my Garmin. My wife followed in a car with a spare bike on the roof and shouted instructions out of the window every so often. What's the difference between this sort of the ride and the Tour de France - apart from the adulation of the crowds, TV coverage, and having to p!ss in a pot every night? :wink:
  • Mike67Mike67 Posts: 585
    I'm looking to do my first Audax around the New Year, having only done a Sportive or three to date...too busy doing CX at the moment(AKA not allowed out on my own more than one day at the weekend :D )

    From talking to the people in my club that have done them, you'll be missing out on the cameraderie of riding with others (if you want to that is), a mid ride cafe meet up and some end of ride food and drink laid on...sounds quite good to me.

    I've also heard rumours that you may be missing out on having to fit mudguards....that may or may not be true though :wink:
    Mike B

    Cannondale CAAD9
    Kinesis Pro 5 cross bike
    Lots of bits
  • Yesterday I rode an audax with some friends the organisation was superb, lots of good quality refreshments before and after the ride, an excellent route sheet and all for £5 entry. Why bother to spend £40 or more on a sportif
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    amaferanga wrote:
    What you're doing is commonly known as 'going for a bike ride'.

    My point exactly. Isn't that what an Audax is?? :D
  • crakercraker Posts: 2,060
    Rather than asking us (we're all a bit wrongheaded imho) I think you should sign up for your next local audax and see if it's any different to just going for a bike ride.

    Tell us what you find out.
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    I'm enjoying these "bike rides" that I've just discovered. They're even cheaper than an audax!
  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    You can do your own audax but you need receipts eg from cashpoints to show location and time. there are 'permanents' or permsin the audax calendars which are set routes and once again you get receipts/atm slips. More info on the Audax UK website or over on www.yacf.co.uk
    M.Rushton
  • fish156fish156 Posts: 496
    ooermissus wrote:
    .... What's the difference between this sort of the ride and the Tour de France - apart from the adulation of the crowds, TV coverage, and having to p!ss in a pot every night? :wink:
    Podium girls.
  • A DIY Audax by GPS is easier, remember to calculate your AAA points :shock:
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    You race on a race bike, do sportives on a sportive bike, audaxes on an audax bike and bike rides on a bike ride bike :lol:
    Faster than a tent.......
  • ooermissus
    Next time drop in for a recovery drink--Beer works best I find (-:
    Come and visit--- HAPPINESS is riding in the sunshine.

    http://chez-ray.vpweb.co.uk/
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    If you want to do Audax you need to:

    1. Grow a beard
    2. Fit mudguards
    3. Get the biggest saddlebag you can find and carry as much stuff as you can muster
    4. Ride 120 miles to a pub and grumble with other like-minded people into your real ale that cycling has gone to hell in a handcart and has an image problem because it keeps attracting attention to itself
    :wink:
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • elliebellieb Posts: 436
    ^ you forgot the sandals
  • Monty Dog wrote:
    If you want to do Audax you need to:

    1. Grow a beard
    2. Fit mudguards
    3. Get the biggest saddlebag you can find and carry as much stuff as you can muster
    4. Ride 120 miles to a pub and grumble with other like-minded people into your real ale that cycling has gone to hell in a handcart and has an image problem because it keeps attracting attention to itself
    :wink:

    Oh, here we go again. Same old rubbish pedalled out by some one that has clearly never ridden an audax

    Grow up.
  • DaveMossDaveMoss Posts: 236
    This really is a silly question.

    Obviously, unless you have the stamped card (from an audax) or the official published time (from a sportive) or your name on the result sheet (time trial or road race) you cannot prove you really did the ride.For all you know you might have dreamt it.

    And anyway, you can enter a lot of audaxes (or one closed road sportive)for the price of a GPS
    Sportives and tours, 100% for charity, http://www.tearfundcycling.btck.co.uk
  • Sounds pretty clear to me ---- you could do a weeks cycling in Provence for the price of a GPS as well !!
    Come and visit--- HAPPINESS is riding in the sunshine.

    http://chez-ray.vpweb.co.uk/
  • rodgers73 wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    What you're doing is commonly known as 'going for a bike ride'.

    My point exactly. Isn't that what an Audax is?? :D

    Many audaxers are riding it with a view toward the:

    (i) Joining the fun and camaraderie of a mass participation event (equally applicable to sportives, charity rides, etc).
    (ii) AUK points competitions such as Altitude Awards, Randonee Round the Year, etc;
    (iii) Prequalification to ultra-randonee such as PBP; or,
    (iv) Validation of a challenging an exerting ride.

    If none of these features register on your radar then I suggest there is little point in you entering an audax or any of form of organised massed cycling event.
  • simon_esimon_e Posts: 1,685
    rodgers73 wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    What you're doing is commonly known as 'going for a bike ride'.

    My point exactly. Isn't that what an Audax is?? :D
    No. An Audax is an organised event on a specific day with a predefined route and stops. What you're doing is a bike ride.

    Don't know if this holds up but I'd say it's a bit like the difference between paying to hire a pitch and play a match with others vs kicking a ball around in the park by yourself.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    rodgers73 wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    What you're doing is commonly known as 'going for a bike ride'.

    My point exactly. Isn't that what an Audax is?? :D

    Many audaxers are riding it with a view toward the:

    (i) Joining the fun and camaraderie of a mass participation event (equally applicable to sportives, charity rides, etc).
    (ii) AUK points competitions such as Altitude Awards, Randonee Round the Year, etc;
    (iii) Prequalification to ultra-randonee such as PBP; or,
    (iv) Validation of a challenging an exerting ride.

    If none of these features register on your radar then I suggest there is little point in you entering an audax or any of form of organised massed cycling event.

    They do register as I do a lot of sportives. I always imagined people who did audaxes ended up cycling alone due to low number of participants and long distances involved, thats all.
  • rodgers73 wrote:

    They do register as I do a lot of sportives. I always imagined people who did audaxes ended up cycling alone due to low number of participants and long distances involved, thats all.

    Fair point but I think that that it all depends upon what event you are entering. There are some audaxes that attract few entrants whilst there are a others with large fields of a few hundred. Personally, I tend to view last year's results to view the number of entries in order to avoid small field events (remembering the not all riders are actually listed in the results because the did not bother with brevets). Another good indicator is whether the event is backed by a strong club. That way it is possible to enjoy the camaraderie of fellow riders.

    Events such as the Cotswolds audaxes, The Elenith, Barry's Bristol Ball Bash, Cheltenham Flyer, Tinsel and Lanes, amongst many others, often attract large fields. For the Snowdrop and Sunrise Express, I usually shut down entries at around 250 although cold winter weather usually wittles down the actual number of riders to 150ish.

    I note that you come from Doncaster and I am unable to comment upon big events in your region. I think that there a few reasonable events operated in the Peak District by Peak Audax and possibly by Sheffrec.


    Don't give up too early - it is a case of careful selection
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    I've found slim pickings so far on the main Audax website for stuff in this area. I'd happily give one a go if I found a route and time that fits well with me, but as I asked originally - would I notice a great deal of difference in doing a small scale audax and just heading out on my own?

    I'd hope not, obviously. Audax is perennially plugged by the bike mags as something we should all have a go at, but in reality I feel I might be getting a broadly similar experience already. None of which is meant as a criticism, they sound like good events and I'm quite jealous of the bigger ones you mentioned.
  • As I've posted earlier I did an Audax last Sunday. I think there were about 80 people riding. We ended up riding in a group of 5, but we all knew each other to start with. We started off in a large group but inevitably over the course of 100+miles groups split up and it depends a lot on where people decide to stop for refreshments and their level of fitness. You usually get a chance to join a group at a common refrshment stop.
    I'd say give one a go and see if you enjoy it. I expect that the more you do the more you meet the same people and as a consequence have people to ride with.
  • ermintrude wrote:
    Yesterday I rode an audax with some friends the organisation was superb, lots of good quality refreshments before and after the ride, an excellent route sheet and all for £5 entry. Why bother to spend £40 or more on a sportif

    I'm with you ermintrude.

    A lot less testosterone (or female equivalent) fogging the air as well.
    Riding a Scott Carbon CR1
    Website: http://www.landsend-...hnogroats.co.uk
    A wise man once said that people who make quotes have too much time on their hands
  • Is that what it costs over there ? The 3 cols here cost 14 Euros I think last year -- refreshments, and a meal with wine at the end of the ride
    I think some ''Organizations'' are cashing in on a ) Cycling becoming so popular and b) Because a bike can cost so much there are a lot of wealthy people riding and are prepared to pay for what sometimes must be a simple money making excercise ?
    Oh and Wendy I have a number of female clients who are looking at a Ladies holiday next summer ?
    Come and visit--- HAPPINESS is riding in the sunshine.

    http://chez-ray.vpweb.co.uk/
  • de_sistide_sisti Posts: 1,191
    rodgers73 wrote:

    They do register as I do a lot of sportives. I always imagined people who did audaxes ended up cycling alone due to low number of participants and long distances involved, thats all.

    Fair point but I think that that it all depends upon what event you are entering. There are some audaxes that attract few entrants whilst there are a others with large fields of a few hundred. Personally, I tend to view last year's results to view the number of entries in order to avoid small field events (remembering the not all riders are actually listed in the results because the did not bother with brevets). Another good indicator is whether the event is backed by a strong club. That way it is possible to enjoy the camaraderie of fellow riders.

    Events such as the Cotswolds audaxes, The Elenith, Barry's Bristol Ball Bash, Cheltenham Flyer, Tinsel and Lanes, amongst many others, often attract large fields. For the Snowdrop and Sunrise Express, I usually shut down entries at around 250 although cold winter weather usually wittles down the actual number of riders to 150ish.

    I note that you come from Doncaster and I am unable to comment upon big events in your region. I think that there a few reasonable events operated in the Peak District by Peak Audax and possibly by Sheffrec.


    Don't give up too early - it is a case of careful selection

    The audaxes that Philip organises (the one's I've ridden) are pretty good, imo.
Sign In or Register to comment.