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Any runners? Transitioning from bike...

huuregeilhuuregeil Posts: 780
edited September 2011 in Training, fitness and health
Hello,

I've (possibly stupidly) been roped into running a few races over the next couple of months (a 5km in a few weeks, followed by a couple of 10kms). Despite having run a bit in the distant past, and played a fair bit of football, the last time I ran seriously was a few years ago. If there are any runners out there, I'd be very keen to get some tips about managing the transition to running.

I feel in good shape on the bike, I've been riding lots this year - the question is, though, how does this translate? I'm inclined to think this translates pretty well, and that all I need at the minute is miles in the legs, coupled with quite a bit of speed work (400/800/1500m intervals). The 5km race is in 3 weeks, I did a relaxed 45min run at on Sunday and my legs feel pretty fine. My plan is to do some 400m intervals tonight, same again Thursday, longer run at the weekend. Next week two sessions of 800m intervals, and a longer run. Third week 1000m intervals then the 5km. I'll go from there as regards the 10k's. Does this sound reasonable? Any more tips for handling the transition?

Thanks for any tips!

Posts

  • twotyredtwotyred Posts: 822
    I'm doing the same as you. Have got a 10k coming up at the start of October. I usually do one run a week but didn't run from April to end July so I'm just now building it up and am running 4 days a week and biking for one. Aerobically I'm in good shape because I've been doing lots of cycling but because cycling is non-impact it means my legs have "gone soft" so I've been building up gradually to get my joints and muscles used to the impact again. Because you haven't run for years I think you should be very careful building up the running volume gradually to avoid injury. Sounds to me like you're doing a bit too much to start but take care and listen to your body.

    I think you have the right idea about mixing longer steady runs with shorter interval sessions I've been following a training programme I've adapted from the Runners World website and its quite similar to what you are doing.

    Must say I can't wait to get the 10 k done and get the balance back to biking as its much more fun than running.
  • huuregeilhuuregeil Posts: 780
    Thanks for the advice. Yes, the "getting used to the impact" thing and not getting injured is the thing I'm most wary of. That said, I've done a couple of solid winters in the gym doing, including some olympic lifting, so I have been stressing my legs, it's not a complete standing start. Out of curiosity, what kind of mileage are you doing?

    And, yes, biking is more fun, but I did what turned out to be a 5x600m interval session last night and it was very satisfying (and time efficient!).

    Regards,
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    Do hill work - rather than flat sprints, much more appropriate for avoiding injury than really fast intervals with your bike fitness.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674
    jibberjim wrote:
    Do hill work - rather than flat sprints, much more appropriate for avoiding injury than really fast intervals with your bike fitness.
    Running downhill will hurt, it's the "getting used to the impact" thing to the max!
  • huuregeilhuuregeil Posts: 780
    jibberjim wrote:
    Do hill work - rather than flat sprints, much more appropriate for avoiding injury than really fast intervals with your bike fitness.

    Good idea, thanks!
  • BiaggiBiaggi Posts: 14
    Do not do any hill work/uneven ground until you're happy with running on the flat with a relaxed and efficient form.

    Hills/uneven ground can induce ankle/knee and the dreaded IT Band/Piri Syndrome - not good!
  • BiaggiBiaggi Posts: 14
    Do not do any hill work/uneven ground until you're happy with running on the flat with a relaxed and efficient form.

    Hills/uneven ground can induce ankle/knee and the dreaded IT Band/Piri Syndrome - not good!
  • I was doing some running earlier in the year before my bike arrived - I did a 10 week "beginners" running course designed to get you up to 5k sort of ability. I did manage a few 5k's, but then my bike arrived and I've not really done any serious running since.

    Firstly, if you google for "Parkrun", you might be able to find a regular 5k near you. They're generally run every saturday and it's free to turn up and run. Running in a bunch with other people is a great way of providing motivation.

    Regarding your intervals - I always found it better to run for a set amount of time at a perceived effort level, rather than doing a set distance. Some of our sessions included:

    - 6x 30 second high intensity effort sessions.
    - 3,2,1 session - find a local, short circuit that you can easily run round, then - one lap at easy (talking) pace, another lap at a more difficult pace (talking possible, but not sustained for any length of time) and then a final lap as flat out as you can go.
    - Out and back sessions - run for 5/10/15 minutes along a particular route (after warming up). Once you've done that, turn back and try and get back in a faster time.

    I've always found that cycling and running fitness doesn't really corrolate. I can be reasonably bike fit, but still turn into a wheezing mess once I try to run. I need to pick it back up again - I have aspirations to doing a triathlon one day, so I suppose I'm going to need to work at it!
    Twitter: @FunkyMrMagic
  • huuregeilhuuregeil Posts: 780
    Firstly, if you google for "Parkrun", you might be able to find a regular 5k near you. They're generally run every saturday and it's free to turn up and run.
    ...
    Regarding your intervals - I always found it better to run for a set amount of time at a perceived effort level, rather than doing a set distance.

    parkrun - genius, thanks, that looks like a great idea!

    Intervals... actually I'd possibly disagree, but do whatever works! Running set distance: a) makes you confront pacing head-on; b) gives you instant comparable/measurable feedback. I have a decent idea of what personally constitutes good 400/800/1000 times from when I ran previously, so it's useful to gauge myself.

    Cheers!
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Seb Coe's coach (his Dad) had him running up hill a lot in the Peaks. Never let him run down though for fear of injury.

    And my knees know from bitter personal experience that it's unwise to run down steep hills carrying a heavy rucksack.

    And my latest orthopaedic surgeon told me not to run but that cycling's OK (and that I'd need to have my knees replaced by the time I'm 60)
  • crakercraker Posts: 1,739
    Got some proper shoes right? Go to a running shoe shop (a proper one) where someone can look at your gait and fit you properly. If not you'll end up injured (probably...).

    Running shoes are about the only bling you can buy for running which is surely why I like cycling.

    Talking of bling, I've got a GPS watch (Garmin 405) which can make the training a bit more organised. It's nice to know what sort of pace you're at and how far you've gone for example.

    I don't quite get the intervals / sprinting thing. I'm sure it's important if you want to compete or beat a PB but if you want to just enjoy running... go for a run somewhere nice. I use a heart rate monitor to keep my effort in check. If you want to run fast / hard go ahead but you might find yourself not wanting to go out for a training session next time around.

    Edit -

    Have you thought about signing up for a longer race like a 1/2 marathon? I found the training for that much more satisfying than for a 10k. A 10k you could almost do without trying but a 1/2 requires some distance runs at least.
  • twotyredtwotyred Posts: 822
    Got some proper shoes right? Go to a running shoe shop (a proper one) where someone can look at your gait and fit you properly. If not you'll end up injured (probably...)

    Have a read of this before you go off spending a fortune on running shoes.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/6968891/Why-expensive-trainers-could-be-worse-than-useless.html

    I've bought a used Garmin 305 off ebay and find its min/km pace readout useful for working out what various race paces actually feel like. Its also handy for fixed distance intervals if you don't have access to a track or don't want to measure off a piece of road.

    I'd second hill intervals (I just gently jog down recovering for the next one) and also a bit of Fartlek adds variation.

    At the moment I'm doing about 35k a week and my longest run has been 10k. I don't see any need to run further than 10k when training for a 10k.
  • crakercraker Posts: 1,739
    twotyred wrote:
    Have a read of this before you go off spending a fortune on running shoes.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/6968891/Why-expensive-trainers-could-be-worse-than-useless.html

    Yes I have read that article.

    What shoes do you run in? :wink:
  • twotyredtwotyred Posts: 822
    Cheap pair of Karrimor's with a very thin sole I found in a sale :)
  • huuregeilhuuregeil Posts: 780
    Thanks both!

    Shoes - yeah, I'm aware of the barefoot debate! I have a decent pair of trainers, not sure I'm prepared to go through the "learn to run barefoot" process for occasional spurts of running.

    mr_si - i guess our ideas of fun differ somewhat! Sprints==fun, distance runs==not fun (I tend to spend the time on a long run wishing I was on the bike instead ;-) ). I ran 800m/1500m in my teens and "enjoyed" it, in a brutally masochistic way! For me, short and sharp and competitive is the only way I really enjoy running.
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    twotyred wrote:
    Cheap pair of Karrimor's with a very thin sole I found in a sale :)

    They are expensive no matter how cheap they are. The worst shoes I have ever bought - soles made of cheese. Actually, cheese might have lasted longer.......
    Faster than a tent.......
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