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Quad Tendinitis?

sporting woodsporting wood Posts: 62
edited September 2011 in Training, fitness and health
After a bit of advice and I'm hoping that someone has experienced something similar.

For the past few years I've experienced discomfort around the top of my knee. Last year I found foam rollers helped a lot to begin with but since then their influence on the condition has weakened. This year I thought I'd shifted it after 2 months off the off the bike for a non-related injury but now it's back and with vengeance, after a while on the bike it will migrate down through the kneecap with increasing severity.

I've been told it's patella tendinitis, I've been told it's a misaligned kneecap and more recently I've been told it's quad tendinitis which would seem to make sense given what I've read about it.

I've been to stretch but I find that after stretching it seems to aggravate the condition, foam roller is still fine though. This is the bit I don't understand everything I read seems to say that stretching helps for any of the above.

If it's useful neither the patella or quad tendon is sensitive to touch.

Has anyone had a similar condition where they've found stretching makes it worse and if so have you got any advice?

Cheers

Ed

Posts

  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    You should get yourself to a specialist via a doctor or pay for it. However, if you go to a NHS doctor be aware that their job is to get you back on your feet and off to work so if you tell them "it hurts when I cycle". They will tell you not to cycle, job done, end of problem. If you were a Postman you might get some help. But if you pay for treatment they are obliged to get you cycling again, if possible.
    If you were to tell the NHS doctor that it hurt when you walked then I think you would stand a better chance of getting free treatment.
    Another thought, borrow a walking stick :wink:
    ...................................................................................................

    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
  • bristolpetebristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Ed,

    I am off the bike with a similar issue. However, my physio has pointed out that the quad issue is indeed pulling the knee cap over but the quad issue itself is being caused by a weakened right glute of which I am working on daily. I have had a week off the bike with the correct exercise should be back on it ASAP. So, get your glutes looked at as this could be the root of the issue. The odd thing is that my pain came out of nowhere form doing 190 miles a week to sudden pain but that's the nature of our sport I think.

    Hope thie helps,

    Pete.
  • Thanks for the responses both.

    Pete, your glutes suggestion makes sense, I've had a weak left glute for a long time. Out of interest is your physio in Bristol, if so who do you see?

    I live in Bristol and hear so many contradictory statements coming from my physio I'm tempted to look elsewhere.
  • bristolpetebristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Thanks for the responses both.

    Pete, your glutes suggestion makes sense, I've had a weak left glute for a long time. Out of interest is your physio in Bristol, if so who do you see?

    I live in Bristol and hear so many contradictory statements coming from my physio I'm tempted to look elsewhere.

    Hi. I used Blue Sky via Redwood Lodge. Donna Hull is a master in her craft and has dealt with more sports injuries than you care to name, given she is married to Paul Hull, ex Bristol Rugby and England Saxons coach.

    Very interesting sessions/advice and talks a lot of sense and is helping me change the way I train given that I have track riders legs - I am shifting my focus to plyometric exercise and light weights to help heavy legs and move forward.

    Lastly, the routine she has given me has helped. 10 days ago I could not even turn a pedal. Today as a test I climbed Jacobs Wells in the big ring no issues.

    Hope your injury is getting better.

    Reagrds,

    Pete.
  • PepPep Posts: 501
    cyco2 wrote:
    However, if you go to a NHS doctor be aware that their job is to get you back on your feet and off to work so if you tell them "it hurts when I cycle". They will tell you not to cycle, job done, end of problem.
    Absolutely true.
    Not sure private doctor would be better in this respect.

    See a decent sport-oriented phisyotherapist. I had similar problem myself, physio did massage and reccommended specific exercises. Exercises are VERY boring but you must persist and do them religiously regularly. I've been doing them every day 15min since Xmas and now see the result.

    See a physio.
  • jswbajswba Posts: 491
    It's a myth that all NHS physios simply look at the impact on your work.

    FWIW I'm currently seeing a very good NHS physio and have told her that my patella tendonitis doesn't affect my work but is preventing my cycling, which is my main leisure pursuit. She's doing an extremely good job and working on my ITB, glutes and patella misalignment while also giving ultrasound treatment. We're into a six-week block of regular sessions, with more to follow if there isn't enough improvement.

    It might be that cyco's had a problem with his/her physio in the past (if so, some evidence would be useful for others in the area) but that's no reason not to see if your GP can offer a referral.
  • avoidingmyphdavoidingmyphd Posts: 1,154
    I'd hesitate before taking medical advice on the internet off someone who doesn't even understand what NHS doctors do.
  • PepPep Posts: 501
    jswba wrote:
    It's a myth that all NHS physios simply look at the impact on your work.
    I agree completely.
    It's doctor that brush you off if it affects "only" sport.
    It might be that cyco's had a problem with his/her physio in the past (if so, some evidence would be useful for others in the area) but that's no reason not to see if your GP can offer a referral.
    Just to add my story: GP sayd that because it was a sport injury I should have seen a physio privately, he did not want to "waste" NHS resources.

    Never mind we do "waste" NHS resources to treat people because of lifestyle choices: diet, alcohol, drug, casual sex...
  • Thanks all. Pete, I may look up that physio, a bit out of my way but I may see if I can get up and see her one day.

    On the NHS argument.....

    I've been seeing private physios, I'm just not sure about their diagnosis on this because what had been suggested seemed to aggravate the injury. I saw an NHS doctor 5 months ago about a separate injury, after already resting for 5 weeks I was told to rest further. Went again a few weeks later (no progress) and they suggested I find a good physio. 2 days later I went private and 2 weeks later I was back on the bike. The original injury was a suspected torn soleus, I've since been told they were wrong but I don't care they got me riding again.

    I'll use NHS again but this particular doctor wasn't interested unless things were falling off, may not be their specific fault and more symptomatic of a stretched health system but hey ho. The NHS has helped me in the past in general I'm grateful.
  • Rod11Rod11 Posts: 293
    Hi there, just thought I'd add my 2 cents...

    I've had a similar sounding knee problem for quite a while now. Saw many physios, all gave me heaps of exercises working on glutes, quads, hamstrings, you name it. But recently I saw a specialist sports doctor who within 2 minutes said that my pelvis was slightly rotated ie one side was sitting a little higher than the other, therefore putting an unequal strain on one knee. He said it's very common, and often over looked. After 3 treatments and some very easy exercises, my pelvis is perfectly aligned and I'm no longer getting knee pain.

    So whoever you see, maybe ask for them to look at this, it's not something I could notice myself until my doctor pointed it out.
  • PepPep Posts: 501
    I'll use NHS again but this particular doctor wasn't interested unless things were falling off, may not be their specific fault and more symptomatic of a stretched health system but hey ho.

    I think this is sadly common for doctors. They see sport and leisure as something outside their world.

    Not sure there is much diffeence between NHS and private though. But huge difference between doctors and physios. Physios consider their job to put you back doing sport. Doctors' job instead is to keep you alive. In short.
  • Thanks all. Pete, I may look up that physio, a bit out of my way but I may see if I can get up and see her one day.

    On the NHS argument.....

    I've been seeing private physios, I'm just not sure about their diagnosis on this because what had been suggested seemed to aggravate the injury. I saw an NHS doctor 5 months ago about a separate injury, after already resting for 5 weeks I was told to rest further. Went again a few weeks later (no progress) and they suggested I find a good physio. 2 days later I went private and 2 weeks later I was back on the bike. The original injury was a suspected torn soleus, I've since been told they were wrong but I don't care they got me riding again.

    I'll use NHS again but this particular doctor wasn't interested unless things were falling off, may not be their specific fault and more symptomatic of a stretched health system but hey ho. The NHS has helped me in the past in general I'm grateful.

    Any news? I am three weeks into my revised physio and swiss ball routines and feeling ok. Did 70 miles in 3.5 hours yesterday with Cheddar in the mix. Got up it slowly, spinning to not stress the knee - tougher than normal due to the break but all going to plan. In a way, I am glad winter is looming as I can focus on slow steady miles again which is nice. I now have 10 days off the bike as I am flying to Memphis to an Elvis convention for a well earned break :D

    Hope you are feeling better.
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