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GP4000s are rubbish

tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
edited April 2011 in Commuting chat
Had the fright of my life last night when my rear tyre sidewall blew out; sounded like someone had let a gun off behind me. 2nd time this year, and this one had done less than 1500 miles...

Thinking of trying Rubino Pros instead; anyone know what they're like in the wet? Are their sidewalls made out of something more robust than paper?
Pannier, 120rpm.
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  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,686
    That's fairly unusual i'd send them back to conti
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  • jzedjzed Posts: 2,926
    tgotb wrote:
    Had the fright of my life last night when my rear tyre sidewall blew out; sounded like someone had let a gun off behind me. 2nd time this year, and this one had done less than 1500 miles...

    Thinking of trying Rubino Pros instead; anyone know what they're like in the wet? Are their sidewalls made out of something more robust than paper?

    CJCP recommended me these tyres. In my previous 4000 miles I had one puncture. Since I have had these tyres (2 weeks) I have had three. Me thinks CJCP may have suggested them to keep me sat at the side of the road pulling tyres of rims rather than chasing him up the stats table. :twisted:
  • GussioGussio Posts: 2,452
    Rubino Pro III's get good reviews and I think that you can pick them up for under £20 if you shop around on t'Web.
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    tgotb wrote:
    Had the fright of my life last night when my rear tyre sidewall blew out; sounded like someone had let a gun off behind me. 2nd time this year, and this one had done less than 1500 miles...

    Thinking of trying Rubino Pros instead; anyone know what they're like in the wet? Are their sidewalls made out of something more robust than paper?

    You! You Wash your mouth out with soap right now!!!

    They are superb tyres and clearly the ones you had were either:

    1). Fake

    2). Defective - like the offspring of a brother, sister combo.

    I'm glad you are alright but GP4000s are spectacular tyres! They are a little lightweight for commuting though, I'd recommend 4season for the commute and GP4000s for sportives/weekend rides.
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  • vorsprungvorsprung Posts: 1,953
    tgotb wrote:
    Had the fright of my life last night when my rear tyre sidewall blew out; sounded like someone had let a gun off behind me. 2nd time this year, and this one had done less than 1500 miles...

    Thinking of trying Rubino Pros instead; anyone know what they're like in the wet? Are their sidewalls made out of something more robust than paper?

    1) if you run over stuff on the road then there is a chance it could destroy your tyre. After 1500 miles of road then you have to admit that this *could* happen. It is not the fault of the tyre

    2) 1500 miles isn't a new tyre. It should last a bit longer than that but it's not like you got them, fitted them and they got trashed the next day

    3) You are probably using GP4000s because they are light, fast and comfortable. Well here's the news: light, fast and comfortable is less able to deflect road debris. Flexible sidewalls are light. Flexible sidewalls are comfortable. Flexible sidewall get gashed more easily. There may be some wonder material that is *slightly* better for flexible sidewalls and *slightly* stronger. But generally speaking strong tyres that resist road debris well ( Marathon+, Durano+ etc ) have thicker, less flexible sidewalls

    Switching to Rubinos might be a bit cheaper but someone will come along in a minute and tell you how their Rubinos got shredded in seconds. Me? I have used some Rubino "Pro Tech" with reinforced side walls on the poor weather commute bike. They were ok but I switched back to marathon+ after a couple of punctures

    The good weather/ summer commute bike has Bontrager racelite hardcases on it.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,080 Lives Here
    Take half a bar or so out of them.

    What pressure you running them at?

    I did 5,000km on them, including the pyrenees with not a single puncture.

    And they weren't even the S, just straight up GP4000. (blue, if anyone's interested)
  • fathertedfatherted Posts: 199
    tgotb wrote:
    Had the fright of my life last night when my rear tyre sidewall blew out; sounded like someone had let a gun off behind me. 2nd time this year, and this one had done less than 1500 miles...

    Thinking of trying Rubino Pros instead; anyone know what they're like in the wet? Are their sidewalls made out of something more robust than paper?

    Can I ask a bit of a dumb question but are your brake blocks positioned 100% correctly ? the block isn't catching the tyre ? even by a fraction ?
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    I've been running them at 120psi (which is the max), partly because I'm under the impression that this reduces the risk of "normal" punctures caused by road debris. They've certainly performed very well in this respect, it's just the sidewall (which should never make contact with debris or the road) which lets them down. It's not isolated damage either, I can see several other areas where it looks like the plies are delaminating.

    I've dropped an email to Continental UK's customer service dept, I'll let you know if I get a response...

    Edit: Definitely not an issue with the brake blocks (or rubbing on frame, mudguard supports etc), I'm fastidious on that one.
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,080 Lives Here
    tgotb wrote:
    I've been running them at 120psi (which is the max), partly because I'm under the impression that this reduces the risk of "normal" punctures caused by road debris. They've certainly performed very well in this respect, it's just the sidewall (which should never make contact with debris or the road) which lets them down. It's not isolated damage either, I can see several other areas where it looks like the plies are delaminating.

    I've dropped an email to Continental UK's customer service dept, I'll let you know if I get a response...

    Edit: Definitely not an issue with the brake blocks (or rubbing on frame, mudguard supports etc), I'm fastidious on that one.

    I'm quite light (55kg odd) But I run my tyres between 6-7 bar, usually towards the 6 end.

    120psi seems a lot unless you weigh a lot.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    120psi seems a lot unless you weigh a lot.
    I do weight a lot; probably 95kg in normal cycling kit, plus a pannier for the commute...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • AguilaAguila Posts: 622
    My 4000s tyres have always been superb.

    I tried Rubino pros after good press on here, roll nicely and grip well but were comfortably the least puncture/cut resistant tyre I have ever used.

    RE pressures, I think there is an optimal pressure to avoid punctures that is a bit less than maximum. about 100-110, above this they seem to cut easier.
  • bobgfishbobgfish Posts: 545
    I think they are OK. In 3 months 3 punctures. Two were a piece of steel that not much would have stopped. The other was a snake bite where I'd taken a very large hit on the front wheel. Again any tyre would have done that. The GP4 season tyre is more comfortably and atter 3 weeks shows none of the cuts on them that seems to happen to the GP4000s. I used the 4000s over winter but next year will use the GP4 tyres instead.
  • solsurfsolsurf Posts: 489
    just changed a set of 4000s as they had gone through the worn markers and on inspection they still look pretty good. Put another pair on (4th pair now) never had any problems.
  • georgeegeorgee Posts: 537
    As stated above, GP400s isn't a commuting tire, I used them to race on and they're excellent, send it back as a sidewall blowout is a touch extreme.

    i've had Rubino pro 28's for about a year on the Roadrat and they are much grippier than gatorskins plus I picked them up for £20 for the pair!

    They're pretty P resistant but even last week I had a couple. I still think i'd buy them again and considered a pair of 25's for Flanders this coming weekend.
  • Rubino Pro - if you absolutely, positively have to scalp every mother on your commute, accept no substitute.
  • Butterd2Butterd2 Posts: 937
    tgotb wrote:
    120psi seems a lot unless you weigh a lot.
    I do weight a lot; probably 95kg in normal cycling kit, plus a pannier for the commute...

    For what it's worth I weigh 100kg and run my 4000s at 100-110psi, I don't want to tempt fate but lets just say I'm very happy with them.
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  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    Just received standard reply from Continental, saying please return to dealer for warranty inspection.

    I'll send it back to Wiggle, but reckon that's the last I'll hear of it...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • pitchshifterpitchshifter Posts: 1,476
    Who will be the first to blame wiggle?

    My set have been fine although not done much mileage..
  • simon_esimon_e Posts: 1,676
    vorsprung speaks much sense. I'd suggest that "GP4000s are not ideal commuting tyres" might be a better thread title :wink:

    Top everyday tyres those Bontrager hardcase. I've also run Rubino Pro II and found them a good compromise between the heavy, tough tyres and really light 'race' type ones.

    Perhaps running a lightweight tyre at the top end of the recommended pressure range isn't ideal, I'd suggest 'maximum' is not the same as optimum. I have a feeling that the thin sidewalls on Conti's lightweight tyres has been highlighted as a weakness before, and 1500 miles ridden by a heavier rider might be reasonable lifetime for a featherweight race tyre.

    Some info from Michelin and Schwalbe:
    http://bicycle.michelin.co.uk/bicycleuk ... 23108.html
    http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/racing_tires
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  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,448
    120psi is a heck of a lot and your pump guage might not be that accurate so it could be even more. 100psi is a lot better. I have had almost 6000 miles out of mine.
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  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,108
    I had an almost new GP4000 blow out on the sidewall. Another older one did the same. Had similar with a pair of Deda Tre tyres, which I managed to spot the problem with before any blow out occurred. Currently running Vittoria Diamantes, got a great big slash in the front very early but managed to superglue it and have done afew 1000 miles since. Light tyres are less durable, just one of those things...
  • GazzaputtGazzaputt Posts: 3,918
    Did you seriously think they were a commuting or training tyre? Conti's website clearly advises this isn't the case.

    1500 miles commuting at 120 psi with say 100kg of weight on them I'm cannot say I'm not surprised they gave way.

    Try Conti Gators for a more robust tyre that is more suited to the task.
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  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    Gazzaputt wrote:
    Did you seriously think they were a commuting or training tyre? Conti's website clearly advises this isn't the case.

    1500 miles commuting at 120 psi with say 100kg of weight on them I'm cannot say I'm not surprised they gave way.

    Try Conti Gators for a more robust tyre that is more suited to the task.

    What's the practical difference between commuting and racing? How can the tyre tell? At best I'm 3-4 kg lighter in weekend trim, and I'd still expect a race tyre to last > 1500 miles.

    I've tried Gatorskins in the past, and they are fully scary in the wet; never again! Apart from the sidewall issues, GP4000s seem to be great; fast, grippy, hard-wearing and about as puncture-resistant as you could reasonably expect...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • chadders81chadders81 Posts: 744
    Erm - shouldn't tyres last longer at a higher pressure?

    Surely there's less tyre well flex and less chance of picking up little nicks if they are hard.
  • bobgfishbobgfish Posts: 545
    I commute 25Km each way on the GP4000s. (with the odd 200Km route thrown in) They are fine. Just don't expect them to hold up to a lot of abuse and loads of glass. They are not a heavy tyre and do get a few cuts on them. If you are after a comuting tyre I would suggest you look elsewhere. I can see why they are good for racing. Good grip in the wet and feel very fast. Not the most comfortable either. I'm aprobaby looking at 4000Km for the set and I'm about 75Kg,
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 15,297
    I have a pair of second hand Rubino Pros on the bike I bought second hand. I've put a further 2000 miles on them and never had a puncture (apart from 1 of those mysterious overnight punctures). They are in an appalling state, cut to pieces but I'm loath to replace them until I puncture again.
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  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    jzed wrote:
    tgotb wrote:
    Had the fright of my life last night when my rear tyre sidewall blew out; sounded like someone had let a gun off behind me. 2nd time this year, and this one had done less than 1500 miles...

    Thinking of trying Rubino Pros instead; anyone know what they're like in the wet? Are their sidewalls made out of something more robust than paper?

    CJCP recommended me these tyres. In my previous 4000 miles I had one puncture. Since I have had these tyres (2 weeks) I have had three. Me thinks CJCP may have suggested them to keep me sat at the side of the road pulling tyres of rims rather than chasing him up the stats table. :twisted:

    :lol: For sportives and stuff, yeah, but not for the commute.
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  • solsurfsolsurf Posts: 489
    Simon E wrote:
    vorsprung speaks much sense. I'd suggest that "GP4000s are not ideal commuting tyres" might be a better thread title :wink:

    Top everyday tyres those Bontrager hardcase. I've also run Rubino Pro II and found them a good compromise between the heavy, tough tyres and really light 'race' type ones.

    Perhaps running a lightweight tyre at the top end of the recommended pressure range isn't ideal, I'd suggest 'maximum' is not the same as optimum. I have a feeling that the thin sidewalls on Conti's lightweight tyres has been highlighted as a weakness before, and 1500 miles ridden by a heavier rider might be reasonable lifetime for a featherweight race tyre.

    Some info from Michelin and Schwalbe:
    http://bicycle.michelin.co.uk/bicycleuk ... 23108.html
    http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/racing_tires

    I use my 4000s for my commute this includes potholes, country lanes, cattle grid and level crossing and they have been great, maybe I shouldn't have said that but they have been good.
  • AguilaAguila Posts: 622
    tgotb wrote:
    Gazzaputt wrote:

    Try Conti Gators for a more robust tyre that is more suited to the task.

    What's the practical difference between commuting and racing? How can the tyre tell? At best I'm 3-4 kg lighter in weekend trim, and I'd still expect a race tyre to last > 1500 miles.

    I've tried Gatorskins in the past, and they are fully scary in the wet
    ; never again! Apart from the sidewall issues, GP4000s seem to be great; fast, grippy, hard-wearing and about as puncture-resistant as you could reasonably expect...

    Complete nonsense, gatorskins grip just fine in the wet.
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