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petrol price and more cycling ?

bearfraserbearfraser Posts: 495
edited March 2011 in The bottom bracket
just quick one -- has this insane petrol hike ( and probably more to come ) made any differance to how much you are all cycling/commuting ??? :?:
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  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 46,746 Lives Here
    No.


    Then again, I use the tube.
  • ProssPross Posts: 22,156
    I'm aiming to commute more by bike but that is more to do with getting some miles in with a view to racing again but the cost of fuel certainly provides more encouragement. Unfortunately I tend to need the car a lot to attend meetings and site inspections so can't ride as much as I would like.
  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,226
    Do high petrol prices affect the way drivers drive?
    Do they use more advanced driving skills to think ahead and use less fierce acceleration and braking?
    Probably not.
  • davieseedaviesee Posts: 6,473
    The weather is much more likely to affect whether I cycle or not.

    If I was a city centre resident and worker then things would be very different.
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • PepPep Posts: 501
    No change here.
    this year so far commuting by

    driving: 3 times
    riding: 37 times

    Prob will get worse but very good so far.
  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    I'll commute by bike if I can. But really people have 'invested' in a car and the petrol price is only going to affect the 'poorer' motorists or those who have to pay out of their own pocket. There will be some fall-off in traffic but not much
    M.Rushton
  • shm_ukshm_uk Posts: 736
    It's incentivised me to cycle more than the two or three times a week I usually do.
  • Not really: I drive my 'normal' car when I have to as far as I have to and as frugally as I can (within reason), but in the Summer months I also drive for fun and have a car that is so spectacularly thirsty that I can get through a full tank in about three hours of lead-footing it round the local backroads...

    My carbon-foorprint is the size of Antarctica - but growing, not shrinking.

    Have fun and use it while you can - when it's gone, it's gone...
  • GazzaputtGazzaputt Posts: 3,918
    I only use the car for 'essential' journeys now.

    I use local shops now and public transport.

    I ride all the time to work so that hasn't changed.
  • shm_uk wrote:
    It's incentivised me to cycle more than the two or three times a week I usually do.

    Likewise. I'm now planning to ride to work 4-5 times a week to save some much-needed money
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 46,746 Lives Here
    I'd imagine the kind of rider who rides for economy reasons is unlikely to join a forum discussing cycling.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,035
    It might mean more people out on bikes who are Not Real Cyclists
  • bompington wrote:
    It might mean more people out on bikes who are Not Real Cyclists
    i have noticed that in my area.
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    The killer is the effect on tourism up here in the Highlands, other parts of the UK too I'm sure. Public transport is limited in many areas and the more remote areas will have less trade due to high fuel prices, don't forget that fuel can be up to 10p a litre more up here even on the mainland! The hilly and twisty nature of the roads means the mpg is lower than in areas with better highways.

    I suspect that those who have the ability to use their car less have been doing so for some years now. Good for the environment, bad for areas reliant on tourism or with poor public transport.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
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  • You will know how much petrol/diesel prices will hurt when drivers start to be "more" economical with their accelerating, braking and speed. Otherwise car drivers moan and groan at the cost but do little about it.

    The big factor in cycling where I live is the new Tyne Tunnel getting built. Lots of extremely heavy traffic queues in the mornings and afternoons means there's tons of new cyclists using the old cyclist tunnel rather then spend 1 hour in a traffic queue. Unfortunately, this new "commuting cycling age" also coinsided with the cyclist tunnel lifts and escalators breaking down for months!
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,433
    MichaelW wrote:
    Do high petrol prices affect the way drivers drive?
    Do they use more advanced driving skills to think ahead and use less fierce acceleration and braking?
    Probably not.
    Funnily enough I saw a report on BBC news the other evening, discussing exactly this. I can't remember the detail, there was a survey mentioned, but apparently a lot pf people are considering the way that they drive (driving slower, accellerating less hard) since the fuel prices have rocketed.

    Me......... I drive my 1.9TDi Passat estate the way you would expect it to be driven and get good fuel economy. My Dax however, has never had good fuel economy, so I drive it like I stole it ! (where conditions permit :) )
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,433
    bompington wrote:
    It might mean more people out on bikes who are Not Real Cyclists
    You mean not cycling enthusiasts. Surely, due to the simple fact that they use a bike reguarly, they're cyclists ?

    Some oik who used a £25 stolen BSO to go to the off licence once a week isn't a cyclist, but what about the person who has absolutely no interest in cycling, but uses the bike every day to commute that two miles to work ?
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,035
    MattC59 wrote:
    bompington wrote:
    It might mean more people out on bikes who are Not Real Cyclists
    You mean not cycling enthusiasts. Surely, due to the simple fact that they use a bike reguarly, they're cyclists ?

    Some oik who used a £25 stolen BSO to go to the off licence once a week isn't a cyclist, but what about the person who has absolutely no interest in cycling, but uses the bike every day to commute that two miles to work ?
    I think you missed the ironic dig at cycling snobs buried deep in my post :wink:
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,433
    bompington wrote:
    MattC59 wrote:
    bompington wrote:
    It might mean more people out on bikes who are Not Real Cyclists
    You mean not cycling enthusiasts. Surely, due to the simple fact that they use a bike reguarly, they're cyclists ?

    Some oik who used a £25 stolen BSO to go to the off licence once a week isn't a cyclist, but what about the person who has absolutely no interest in cycling, but uses the bike every day to commute that two miles to work ?
    I think you missed the ironic dig at cycling snobs buried deep in my post :wink:
    I did think it was a little odd coming from yourself :)
    Sorry, busy day, last day before I'm off work for 2 weeks. i clearly wasn't giving 'Cake Stop' my full attention. :wink:
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    If I didn't need my car for meetings etc I would cycle every day, but unfortunately I need the car most days. It annoys me but not a lot I can do about it.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 5,669
    I'm self employed and have to use the car to go about my business, averaging about 250 miles per week.

    These price rises are hurting, my own personal income has suffered noticeably. censored all I can do except hope the government sees sense and reduces tax on the stuff, I was surprised to see myself in agreement with Ed Balls for once when he said VAT on fuel should be reduced.
  • PigtailPigtail Posts: 424
    I bought a Times to read on the train today, and they are saying that the chancellor is likely to provide some relief for motorists in the budget. He is mindful of the mess Labour got into with the fuel protests.
  • cakewalkcakewalk Posts: 220
    bearfraser wrote:
    just quick one -- has this insane petrol hike ( and probably more to come ) made any differance to how much you are all cycling/commuting ??? :?:

    Why insane? Petrol is cheap.
    "I thought of it while riding my bicycle."
  • Buckled_RimsBuckled_Rims Posts: 1,648
    cakewalk wrote:
    Why insane? Petrol is cheap.

    Can't remember where I heard it, but apparently a gallon of petrol has enough energy stored within itself to heat your home for 2 years. If correct, petrol is cheap!
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • MrChuckMrChuck Posts: 1,663
    No car so makes no odds to me (well, apart from higfher transport costs in general being passed on to the consumer of course).
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 5,669
    cakewalk wrote:
    bearfraser wrote:
    just quick one -- has this insane petrol hike ( and probably more to come ) made any differance to how much you are all cycling/commuting ??? :?:

    Why insane? Petrol is cheap.
    No it isn't, the price is increased out of all proportion to it's extraction and refining costs by very high taxation rates.

    And tree-hugger arguments can't alter that fact, whatever their merits may or may not be.
  • mingmongmingmong Posts: 613
    Yes for me. Added two fifty mile round trips in a week. These plus a night and weekend ride may result the need for new work attire - Still cheaper than LPG driving though :D
  • Smokin Joe wrote:
    cakewalk wrote:
    bearfraser wrote:
    just quick one -- has this insane petrol hike ( and probably more to come ) made any differance to how much you are all cycling/commuting ??? :?:

    Why insane? Petrol is cheap.
    No it isn't, the price is increased out of all proportion to it's extraction and refining costs by very high taxation rates.

    And tree-hugger arguments can't alter that fact, whatever their merits may or may not be.

    Hasn't petrol stayed level in inflationary terms? Lets assume there has been an average of 2.5% inflation and then assume petrol was 99p in 2000. Petrol should be about 129.8p...which is roughly what it is - and that's with a weak pound and raised oil price.

    (Apologies if my economics and assumptions are wrong. :oops: )
    What wheels...? Wheelsmith.co.uk!
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 46,746 Lives Here
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    cakewalk wrote:
    bearfraser wrote:
    just quick one -- has this insane petrol hike ( and probably more to come ) made any differance to how much you are all cycling/commuting ??? :?:

    Why insane? Petrol is cheap.
    No it isn't, the price is increased out of all proportion to it's extraction and refining costs by very high taxation rates.

    And tree-hugger arguments can't alter that fact, whatever their merits may or may not be.

    Hasn't petrol stayed level in inflationary terms? Lets assume there has been an average of 2.5% inflation and then assume petrol was 99p in 2000. Petrol should be about 129.8p...which is roughly what it is - and that's with a weak pound and raised oil price.

    (Apologies if my economics and assumptions are wrong. :oops: )
    It's a little misleading, because oil is one of the biggest components of inflation - since the oil price affects so many prices of everything else . Such is the economy's dependance on the stuff.
  • Smokin Joe wrote:
    cakewalk wrote:
    bearfraser wrote:
    just quick one -- has this insane petrol hike ( and probably more to come ) made any differance to how much you are all cycling/commuting ??? :?:

    Why insane? Petrol is cheap.
    No it isn't, the price is increased out of all proportion to it's extraction and refining costs by very high taxation rates.

    And tree-hugger arguments can't alter that fact, whatever their merits may or may not be.

    Hasn't petrol stayed level in inflationary terms? Lets assume there has been an average of 2.5% inflation and then assume petrol was 99p in 2000. Petrol should be about 129.8p...which is roughly what it is - and that's with a weak pound and raised oil price.

    (Apologies if my economics and assumptions are wrong. :oops: )
    It's a little misleading, because oil is one of the biggest components of inflation - since the oil price affects so many prices of everything else . Such is the economy's dependance on the stuff.

    Good point - But is it the case that petrol is actually priced correctly in proportional level compared to at any point in the past 10-15 years?
    What wheels...? Wheelsmith.co.uk!
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