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Sutton Sky Asthma

frenchfighterfrenchfighter Posts: 30,642
edited February 2011 in Pro race
puff.JPG
Contador is the Greatest
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  • cornerblockcornerblock Posts: 3,228
    Ventolin? Matches the Sky kit. Great attention to detail. 8)
  • calvjonescalvjones Posts: 3,850
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?
    ___________________

    Strava is not Zen.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,010 Lives Here
    That's not the strongest look I've ever seen.
  • HibbsHibbs Posts: 291
    calvjones wrote:
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?

    Why? Cycling caused my asthma and I'm sure it's the same for many others.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Yep, diagnosed with asthma myself in 2009...
  • Karl2010Karl2010 Posts: 511
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?
  • LangerDanLangerDan Posts: 6,132
    Karl2010 wrote:
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exercise-induced_asthma
    'This week I 'ave been mostly been climbing like Basso - Shirley Basso.'
  • moray_gubmoray_gub Posts: 3,328
    calvjones wrote:
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?

    I suspect not too many people would even be aware of this or even give a monkeys either way if they were.
    Gasping - but somehow still alive !
  • SpaceJunkSpaceJunk Posts: 1,157
    I'm always amazed how the peloton is littered with asthmatics, yet I've nearly ever seen a rider pull out the puffer during a race.

    Odd.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,010 Lives Here
    SpaceJunk wrote:
    I'm always amazed how the peloton is littered with asthmatics, yet I've nearly ever seen a rider pull out the puffer during a race.

    Odd.

    Petacchi got caught...
  • calvjonescalvjones Posts: 3,850
    Karl2010 wrote:
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?

    Li et al, 2003 say 'possibly'

    There is growing epidemiological evidence that in- creased cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality follow a sudden surge in ambient PM levels [36,37]. The acute respiratory events include acute asthma exacerbations, as reflected by increased symptom score as well as increased use of medication and hospitalization [38,39]. In addition to these acute effects, there is evidence that DEP act as an adjuvant for allergic sensitization to common environmental allergens

    Other study also shows athletes significantly overmedicate with inhalers.
    ___________________

    Strava is not Zen.
  • Hibbs wrote:
    calvjones wrote:
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?

    Why? Cycling caused my asthma and I'm sure it's the same for many others.

    Calvjones - I'd be interested to see the figures for the proportion of the pro peleton who have TUE certificates for ventolin.

    Without wishing to take away from anyones hard work it does make me wonder how many of them are taking the micky with ventolin. The fitter I get and the more I ride the less I need my inhaler and the higher I blow on the peak flow meter. Also if the NHS can successfully manage my asthma symptoms why can't the team doctors? I'm not sure I buy into the theory that they inhale more air/allergens than me either.

    Hibbs - do you mean exercise triggers your asthma, you first became aware of your asthma whilst cycling or that cycling definatively caused your asthma? The general view fom my asthma clinic is that aerobic exercise is good for people with asthma and is actively encouraged.
  • cornerblockcornerblock Posts: 3,228
    Karl2010 wrote:
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?

    Was just asking myself this. Had asthma since childhood, if anything cycling along with swimming has helped my condition no end. To the point that I sometimes go out on a long ride without my inhaler. Always good seeing or hearing of professional sportsmen/women with asthma, as it shows children who have it that they can still take part in sports and get to the top. Were not many role models around when I was a kid, so show off them inhalers with pride!!
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,010 Lives Here
    Karl2010 wrote:
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?



    I thought it was more just gulping large volumes of air for long periods of time - especially cold air.
  • calvjonescalvjones Posts: 3,850
    Karl2010 wrote:
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?



    I thought it was more just gulping large volumes of air for long periods of time - especially cold air.

    Time for a study with separate samples of Classics and GT riders methinks.
    ___________________

    Strava is not Zen.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,010 Lives Here
    calvjones wrote:
    Karl2010 wrote:
    Cycling causes asthma?

    Is this becuase we are gulping down exhaust fumes?



    I thought it was more just gulping large volumes of air for long periods of time - especially cold air.

    Time for a study with separate samples of Classics and GT riders methinks.

    Ah, my favourite distinction...
  • hammeritehammerite Posts: 3,408
    I'm not sure the amount of salbutamol you get from a couple of puffs would be enough to have much of an effect on a rider (from a PED point of view). My understanding was that Pettachi was found to have levels of salbutamol much higher than you'd be able to get from pufing on an inhaler.

    As for having asthma under control... I've had asthma for about 30 years (since before I was at school!), I can't remember the last time I had to take my inhaler while out cycling or running, doesn't meant to say I stop carrying my inhaler. I asked whether I should stop carrying mine at my last asthma clinic appointment, the nurse advised me never to not carry my inhaler even though it's under control.

    I'm probably one of the fittest people who visits my Dr's surgery (rarely), yet I score shockingly bad on the peak flow! My Dad (also an asthmatic) failed a fitness test at Royal Mail years back based in his peak flow yet had only just completed a marathon in 3hrs dead (he proved this and he was offered the job)
  • HibbsHibbs Posts: 291
    Hibbs wrote:
    calvjones wrote:
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?

    Why? Cycling caused my asthma and I'm sure it's the same for many others.

    Calvjones - I'd be interested to see the figures for the proportion of the pro peloton who have TUE certificates for ventolin.

    Without wishing to take away from anyones hard work it does make me wonder how many of them are taking the micky with ventolin. The fitter I get and the more I ride the less I need my inhaler and the higher I blow on the peak flow meter. Also if the NHS can successfully manage my asthma symptoms why can't the team doctors? I'm not sure I buy into the theory that they inhale more air/allergens than me either.

    Hibbs - do you mean exercise triggers your asthma, you first became aware of your asthma whilst cycling or that cycling definatively caused your asthma? The general view fom my asthma clinic is that aerobic exercise is good for people with asthma and is actively encouraged.

    No, cycling definitively caused my asthma. Well, as definitive as it can be from a doctor I suppose. That was his belief and he said there was no other identifiable trigger.
  • SpaceJunk wrote:
    I'm always amazed how the peloton is littered with asthmatics, yet I've nearly ever seen a rider pull out the puffer during a race.

    Odd.

    Raced in a stage race my end last year. Some pretty high standard riders taking huge gulps before climbs...
    "A cyclist has nothing to lose but his chain"

    PTP Runner Up 2015
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    Hibbs wrote:
    Hibbs wrote:
    calvjones wrote:
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?

    Why? Cycling caused my asthma and I'm sure it's the same for many others.

    Calvjones - I'd be interested to see the figures for the proportion of the pro peloton who have TUE certificates for ventolin.

    Without wishing to take away from anyones hard work it does make me wonder how many of them are taking the micky with ventolin. The fitter I get and the more I ride the less I need my inhaler and the higher I blow on the peak flow meter. Also if the NHS can successfully manage my asthma symptoms why can't the team doctors? I'm not sure I buy into the theory that they inhale more air/allergens than me either.

    Hibbs - do you mean exercise triggers your asthma, you first became aware of your asthma whilst cycling or that cycling definatively caused your asthma? The general view fom my asthma clinic is that aerobic exercise is good for people with asthma and is actively encouraged.

    No, cycling definitively caused my asthma. Well, as definitive as it can be from a doctor I suppose. That was his belief and he said there was no other identifiable trigger.

    Are you sure you're not confusing cycling being the trigger for the asthma symptoms as opposed to cycling actually giving you asthma? I have asthma (very mild fortunately apart from a single severe attack when I was 21) and the trigger for me is going from cold-hot. That doesn't mean though that going from cold-hot environments gave me asthma.
    More problems but still living....
  • HibbsHibbs Posts: 291
    amaferanga wrote:
    Hibbs wrote:
    Hibbs wrote:
    calvjones wrote:
    I wonder if the proportion of pro cyclists with inhalers has to drop somewhere near the population average before the sport is taken properly seriously?

    Why? Cycling caused my asthma and I'm sure it's the same for many others.

    Calvjones - I'd be interested to see the figures for the proportion of the pro peloton who have TUE certificates for ventolin.

    Without wishing to take away from anyones hard work it does make me wonder how many of them are taking the micky with ventolin. The fitter I get and the more I ride the less I need my inhaler and the higher I blow on the peak flow meter. Also if the NHS can successfully manage my asthma symptoms why can't the team doctors? I'm not sure I buy into the theory that they inhale more air/allergens than me either.

    Hibbs - do you mean exercise triggers your asthma, you first became aware of your asthma whilst cycling or that cycling definatively caused your asthma? The general view fom my asthma clinic is that aerobic exercise is good for people with asthma and is actively encouraged.

    No, cycling definitively caused my asthma. Well, as definitive as it can be from a doctor I suppose. That was his belief and he said there was no other identifiable trigger.
    Are you sure you're not confusing cycling being the trigger for the asthma symptoms as opposed to cycling actually giving you asthma? I have asthma (very mild fortunately apart from a single severe attack when I was 21) and the trigger for me is going from cold-hot. That doesn't mean though that going from cold-hot environments gave me asthma.

    Yes, that's what my doctor told me. I didn't have asthma. I then developed asthma. The Dr reckons it was because of the amount of cycling that I did. (I did A LOT at that time as a teenager.)
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    Hibbs wrote:
    Yes, that's what my doctor told me. I didn't have asthma. I then developed asthma. The Dr reckons it was because of the amount of cycling that I did. (I did A LOT at that time as a teenager.)

    I guess that's one GPs opinion. He really should be practising evidence-based medicine and not just sprouting stuff like this cos he's got a hunch.
    More problems but still living....
  • Paul EPaul E Posts: 2,052
    I always carry mine with me, cold air does make it harder to breathe but when I last saw the asthma nurse she was a bit confused that I could push the peak flow meter to the end and when I said yeah I cycle quite a lot you could see a light go on in her head and she said "ahh that's why, keep it up it's helps a lot"

    The only time I need my releiver is when I am ill with a chest infection mainly in the winter, I am on seretide twice a day though which is a steriod and a long term bronchio dialator in one.

    I still out pace a few people even though I have asthma, for the most part I don't even think about it.

    I developed mine after a severe chest infection that meant I ended up in casualty with 25% lung function left and quite ill.
  • andyxmandyxm Posts: 132
    amaferanga wrote:
    Hibbs wrote:
    Yes, that's what my doctor told me. I didn't have asthma. I then developed asthma. The Dr reckons it was because of the amount of cycling that I did. (I did A LOT at that time as a teenager.)

    I guess that's one GPs opinion. He really should be practising evidence-based medicine and not just sprouting stuff like this cos he's got a hunch.

    I caught asthma off a dog! I'd never had asthma then I stayed in a house with a dog and now I've got asthma. ;-)
  • dulldavedulldave Posts: 949
    I think I remember reading somewhere that ventolin wasn't particularly helpful unless you actually had asthma. Anyone know more about this? Did I dream it?
    Scottish and British...and a bit French
  • Paul EPaul E Posts: 2,052
    dulldave wrote:
    I think I remember reading somewhere that ventolin wasn't particularly helpful unless you actually had asthma. Anyone know more about this? Did I dream it?

    It can only open up your airways in your lungs so much as there is a limit, depends if you have inflammation but if you have that would be asthma.

    Maybe it just opens them up that little bit extra if you don't have asthma and it's just a bigger effect if you do have asthma.
  • ratsbeyfusratsbeyfus Posts: 2,841
    puff.JPG

    That's not an inhaler... that's a periscope for Mini-Mr-Sutton.

    HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHA


    hahahahhahahabhhahahhahahhahaha



    ahahhahahhahahahhahah


    hahahah



    haha?


    ahem...


    (cough)







    I'll get my coat...


    I had one of them red bikes but I don't any more. Sad face.

    @ratsbey
  • jerry3571jerry3571 Posts: 1,532
    I can't remeber who it was (English speaking rider) who said that he found out when he retired from bike racing that he had Asthma. This, so he reckons, was because he commonly used Steriods through his career which masked the condition.
    The sign of an (steroid) inhaler is no bad thing. If he was on the high octane doping patches (Di Luca style) then there would be no need for the Ventolin.
    Hmmm... :wink:

    -Jerry
    “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving”- Albert Einstein

    "You can't ride the Tour de France on mineral water."
    -Jacques Anquetil
  • Ventolin isn't a steroid. It's a Beta-agonist. Still, the point you make is valid :-p
  • sheffsimonsheffsimon Posts: 1,282
    andyxm wrote:
    amaferanga wrote:
    Hibbs wrote:
    Yes, that's what my doctor told me. I didn't have asthma. I then developed asthma. The Dr reckons it was because of the amount of cycling that I did. (I did A LOT at that time as a teenager.)

    I guess that's one GPs opinion. He really should be practising evidence-based medicine and not just sprouting stuff like this cos he's got a hunch.

    I caught asthma off a dog! I'd never had asthma then I stayed in a house with a dog and now I've got asthma. ;-)

    Didnt know asthma was an STD :wink:
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