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Another HR question

AirwaveAirwave Posts: 483
How accurate do other people find resting HR at predicting recovery from a hard training sessions.I'm talking about taking it in the morning roughly at the same time each day after a hard training session or a long ride the day before.I ask because quiet often my RHR will be back to normal the morning after a training ride or a TT.Even 3/4days consisting of long rides&TT/training rides it will be around my normal RHR.Sometimes my RHR is low but my legs are telling me no don't ride.Just seems to me RHR can be a bit hit&miss at predicting training stresses.Just asking realy how others find the balence between training&recovery.

Posts

  • chrisw12chrisw12 Posts: 1,246
    'how others find the balence between training&recovery.' trying to answer this question using hr was the tipping point to me buying a power meter. I'd messed around with trimps, knew my hr patterns inside out, did a lot of reading and realised that using hr for anything relating to long term training and performance was an in-exact science (aka a complete waste of time.)
  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    The heart is a small muscle in relationship to others in the body and will recover very quickly.The entire leg muscles being bigger will need more time to recover. However, all muscles are effected by the contents of waste products in your blood. Until these are flushed out they will not be fully recovered. The weariness you feel in the muscles means they are still producing waste products.
    These waste products get flushed out by the kidneys in to the urine. So, as a rough guide when you are completely rested do a litmus test on it. Then when after training track the changes that take place with how you feel. Couple this with your RHR and you may find you have some interesting data.
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    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
  • cyco2 wrote:
    However, all muscles are effected by the contents of waste products in your blood. Until these are flushed out they will not be fully recovered. The weariness you feel in the muscles means they are still producing waste products.
    These waste products get flushed out by the kidneys in to the urine.
    What waste products are you referring to?
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    cyco2 wrote:
    However, all muscles are effected by the contents of waste products in your blood. Until these are flushed out they will not be fully recovered. The weariness you feel in the muscles means they are still producing waste products.
    These waste products get flushed out by the kidneys in to the urine.
    What waste products are you referring to?

    Fiver says he refers to lactic acid.
  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    Sorry Tuck, but you're going to lose your fiver. :) The products in blood of a muscle working at different levels is numerous. I am not able to tell you what they are, but I guess it's on Google somewhere. Or in someone's notes somewhere.

    As a start check this one out. http://www.anytestkits.com/utk-ketones-in-urine.htm


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    ...................................................................................................

    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
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