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Hill climbing simulation on turbo

dabberdabber Posts: 1,620
I'm interested in how others simulate hill climbing with a turbo. In particular in the standing position.
Do you do anything to raise the front wheel SIGNIFICANTLY off the ground? I've just got a Tacx Sirius and for a normal turbo workout I have the front wheel on an old copy of Yellow Pages but will probably get a Cyclops Climbing Riser Block for better stability. I don't think this in itself will raise the front significantly higher than the old Yellow Pages but I know I could stack a couple of the Cyclops Blocks to additional height.
I ask the question as standing with the turbo doesn't feel very natural to me at the moment and my Sufferfest "Angels" is telling me to stand up..
“You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Calibre Bossnut

Posts

  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    I stick up the resistance to about 7 or 8 (I have the satori) and drop down a couple of gears (harder), this I find perfectly simulates a tough but do-able gradient incline. If I'm following a sufferfest vid I may make it harder/easier dependant on the instructions.
  • dabberdabber Posts: 1,620
    It's not a problem with being able to simulate the load/workrate element. I'm still learning but playing around with the Tacx load lever and/or the gear selection seems to work pretty well. It's the "feel" of standing up when, in reality being pretty parallel to the floor. I feel I'm hanging off the front of the bike and it's quite a different feel from when I'm standing up going up a real climb.
    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

    Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Calibre Bossnut
  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    Well what are you wanting the floor to move for you?

    Most things wont 'feel' right as nothing can simulate actually going out for a ride and doing it for real.

    :lol:
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Bearing in mind the wheelbase of a bike is roughly 1 metre, then raising the front wheel by, for example, 6cm gives you roughly a 6% gradient.
    I just do seated climbing on mine.
  • I've often used a 12-pack of Whiskas under the front wheel - it tends to be what's lying around the garage most of the time.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    I use my cordless drill box...
  • dabberdabber Posts: 1,620
    Garz wrote:
    Well what are you wanting the floor to move for you?
    :lol:

    That's what I keep asking SWMBO..... but back to cycling. :lol: :shock:
    The front wheel automatically rising would be a nice feature... unfortunately my turbo is a bit more basic than that. :cry:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Bearing in mind the wheelbase of a bike is roughly 1 metre, then raising the front wheel by, for example, 6cm gives you roughly a 6% gradient.
    I just do seated climbing on mine.

    I hadn't thought of it in those terms. Fair comment. The reason i'd like to try simulating standing is that I find that when out actuallyon the road, rising and getting up out of the saddle for a climb effects my breathing a lot more than staying in the saddle. I don't know if that is usual or not. :oops:

    So, drill boxes, whiskas... do you think a crate of beer might be more efficaceous as I could dip in for a little refreshment at the same time. :?
    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

    Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Calibre Bossnut
  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    dabber wrote:

    I hadn't thought of it in those terms. Fair comment. The reason i'd like to try simulating standing is that I find that when out actuallyon the road, rising and getting up out of the saddle for a climb effects my breathing a lot more than staying in the saddle. I don't know if that is usual or not. :oops:

    That's fair comment Dabber. I have found that this tapers off (your breathing issue) if you practice out of saddle by increasing the resistance.

    Watch something which has a clock/timer on it on the telly for example I used to watch a football match. In intervals of every five minutes spend 30 seconds out of the saddle watching the clock to assist when to start/stop.

    As you get better you can up it to say 60 seconds out of the saddle and can play around with your own training ideas.
  • cyco2cyco2 Posts: 593
    When I did hill work I raised the front forks on a frame I made from 2 plywood triangles. Held 6" apart with screwed rod,washers and nuts. The forks sat on a bar that could be raised through holes at different heights.

    There is also a cross trainer that I stood up on too cycle. But if you want some real hill climbing pain do one legged squats on your toes. :) You may need to rest your hands on something to keep your balance.
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    If you want to be a strong rider you have to do strong things.
    However if you train like a cart horse you'll race like one.
  • dabberdabber Posts: 1,620
    Looks like you really went to town with your special frame. Clever idea.

    I had a go at those one legged, tiptoes squats.hhhmmm, painful. I'd have to build up slowly with those.
    Cheers
    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

    Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Calibre Bossnut
  • simon_esimon_e Posts: 1,676
    Garz wrote:
    Watch something which has a clock/timer on it on the telly for example I used to watch a football match. In intervals of every five minutes spend 30 seconds out of the saddle watching the clock to assist when to start/stop.

    As you get better you can up it to say 60 seconds out of the saddle and can play around with your own training ideas.
    I found that, when trying to increase the time spent out of the saddle, counting up to four, once for each pedal stroke, kept my mind on the job. I kept it at four as I found after a dozen or so I would start wondering whether I should stop at 16 or maybe 20, whereas repeating the one-two-three-four over and over kept my mind on just doing it and I wouldn't think about whether I did more or fewer last time and so on.

    I also find counting pedal strokes easier than watching the clock, which ticks painfully slowly when you're doing something like that.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    Yeah I know what you mean but basically what I was getting at was the more you practice this the easier it becomes (fitness improves). I used to struggle to maintain 30 seconds when unfit but after a few weeks 2min+ out of the saddle is when it gets tougher as opposed to the original 30secs.

    I might try the counting technique though..
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