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Seat height

fixiebobfixiebob Posts: 222
edited December 2010 in MTB beginners
Hi all I'm fairly new to mountain biking being a roady and triathlete.
I am doing trails in the winter months for training and really enjoying it but am not sure about bike set up should I have my seat height the same as my road bike or lower for more control.

Posts

  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Whatever feels best to you! I would start at the same pedal to saddle height, you can always drop it a little if needs be. MTBers have all sorts of different heights.
  • LjStrongeLjStronge Posts: 287
    It is down to rider preference as Supersonic says, they are loads of Articles on the net about what is the "right " height and how to maximise pedalling efficency blah blah blah.

    For me - I start with it quite high while I'm on my way to the trails and then just drop it down when I start doing the down hill trails.

    I never have a specific height I always put it at, I just drop it and sit on it and if it feels right then for me it's spot on.

    Just remember that if you start taking decent steep drop offs or similar you will need to start getting your backside over the back of the bike and a lower saddle will help you do that
    Specialized Rockhopper Comp 2009.
  • fixiebobfixiebob Posts: 222
    Thanks to you both I have a second hand Rockhopper Comp I will see if I can get a quick release for seat post so I can change it easy.
  • A quick release for your seat is really important as you will be moving it far more often than on your road bikes.
    I stick my seat up into the optimum pedaling position if there is a long climb or fire road section ahead, drop it a couple of inches for levelish trail sections where I am in and out of the saddle and drop it even lower for long downhill sections. Not too low though, you don't want to slam too hard on it if you slip a pedal!
  • fixiebobfixiebob Posts: 222
    Just need to find somewhere to get a 30.9 quick release seatpost clamp now :(
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    30.9? WHat is your bike? Specialized?
  • thel33terthel33ter Posts: 2,684
    supersonic wrote:
    30.9? WHat is your bike? Specialized?

    He said a rockhopper a few posts up
    And now you know, and knowing is half the battle
    05 Spesh Enduro Expert
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  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Seat clamp not 30.9 then - that's the seat post size.

    Is 34.9mm
  • LjStrongeLjStronge Posts: 287
    supersonic wrote:
    Seat clamp not 30.9 then - that's the seat post size.

    Is 34.9mm

    Spot on - I have the same bike as him! lol
    Specialized Rockhopper Comp 2009.
  • fixiebobfixiebob Posts: 222
    Thanks all quick release seatpost clamp on the way.
  • Glad i found this post, I just ordered one of ebay, 30.8 one doh!! Need to get hold of the a 34.9 now, funnily enough for my rockhopper :P
  • For general XC, most experts suggest lowering your saddle by 10mm from your normal road height. it means you sit into the bike more and can move your bodyweight around more easily, apparently it even helps with your climbing.

    I'm predominantly a mountain biker but do a fair amount of road miles for training, commuting and fun. If I've spent a long time on my road bike and jump on my MTB it feels really weird having a lower saddle so I tend to run mine only a tiny bit lower (3-5mm) but it's still a very noticeable drop. Because I'm so sensitive to small height adjustments I use a bolt-up seatpost clamp and resist the temptation to drop the saddle for descents. When I first started riding I was moving the saddle up and down all the time, but as I've got more confident and my legs have become so attuned to pedalling I find no benefit in slamming the saddle. If you're a fit roadie type I'd say leave it up but do make measurements from the pedal at it's furthest point from the saddle as MTB's often have longer cranks than road bikes. Also bear in mind that on cold days when you're wearing lots of layers (thick padded bibs + tights + baggies) you may need to drop the saddle, sounds daft but happened to me yesterday!
    I had to beat them to death with their own shoes...
    HiFi Pro Carbon '09

    LTS DH '96

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  • A quick release for your seat is really important as you will be moving it far more often than on your road bikes.
    I stick my seat up into the optimum pedaling position if there is a long climb or fire road section ahead, drop it a couple of inches for levelish trail sections where I am in and out of the saddle and drop it even lower for long downhill sections. Not too low though, you don't want to slam too hard on it if you slip a pedal!

    Someone needs a drop post badly!!!!!
  • gezzzagezzza Posts: 324
    I never adjust my saddle height i fail to ever see the need.

    For XC riding theres absolutely no need to adjust the height
  • diydiy Posts: 6,473
    How come these 'Hoppers don't have QR already? I don't think I have seen one without a QR clamp?

    These are pretty good:
    http://superstar.tibolts.co.uk/product_ ... ducts_id=4

    Some of the above advice doesn't apply to Full sus, but its good advice for Hard tails.
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