Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

road side repairs...

leflef Posts: 728
edited October 2010 in Road beginners
When changing an inner tube is it safe to carefully sit the rear end of the bike down so its resting on the derailleur when leaning against a tree / wall etc?

The bike is light so not a lot of weight on it.

Posts

  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 9,675
    I wouldn't, but I'm a bit OCD with this kind of thing.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    I definitely wouldn't. For a start, I figure it would be easy to screw the alignment of the rear mech, etc. (I just had to buy a new one after a mechanical, but that's another story). I would also be very wary about resting the chain/mech in the dirt and crud. I can see lots of grit and crud getting picked up by an oily chain, with a potential of wrecking the cassette, etc.
  • AndyOgyAndyOgy Posts: 579
    What's wrong with flipping the bike upside down?
  • I believe I have a solution

    http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoon ... yn904l.jpg


    Sorry, couldn't resist
    Specialized Secteur Elite 2011 - SRAM Apex
    Specialized Rockhopper Comp 2008 - Shimano XT
    Mtbs for 12 years - now a newbie to the road - be gentle with me
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    It absolutely is NOT ok to rest the bike on the derailleur.

    Upend it.
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,565
    Upside-down damages saddles, computers, bar tape and it may still fall over. Put the bike on its side (and remove/refit wheels with the bike the right way up).
  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,164
    Remove the wheel with the bike upright. Place the bike down drive side upwards whilst you change the inner. Insert the wheel, holding the bike upright.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    balthazar wrote:
    Upside-down damages saddles, computers, bar tape and it may still fall over. Put the bike on its side (and remove/refit wheels with the bike the right way up).
    Take the computer off.

    The only "damage" saddles and bar tape will suffer can be wiped off with your glove.
  • AndyOgyAndyOgy Posts: 579
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    balthazar wrote:
    Upside-down damages saddles, computers, bar tape and it may still fall over. Put the bike on its side (and remove/refit wheels with the bike the right way up).
    Take the computer off.

    The only "damage" saddles and bar tape will suffer can be wiped off with your glove.

    Exactly! And if you want to make things even more stable - Take the relevant allen key with you and rotate the bars upward slightly. It'll then be the hoods in direct contact with the ground and computers/lights etc will not get damaged. It'll add about a minute to the total repair time.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Why wreck your saddle, lever hoods and bar tape when you can usually find a convenient fence, tree of ride-buddy to hold your bike for you? Otherwise, there's plenty of ways to lay-down a bike without resting it on the rear mech or needing to up-end it.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • balthazar wrote:
    Upside-down damages saddles, computers, bar tape and it may still fall over. Put the bike on its side (and remove/refit wheels with the bike the right way up).

    +1

    Why would I want to risk scuffing an expensive saddle and hoods?
  • softladsoftlad Posts: 3,513
    I always rest the bike on the mech when dropping the rear wheel out - right or wrong, it's never been a problem...
  • sundogsundog Posts: 243
    balthazar wrote:
    Upside-down damages saddles, computers, bar tape and it may still fall over. Put the bike on its side (and remove/refit wheels with the bike the right way up).

    +100

    Lay the bike on its side, if your worried about scratching your pedals or levers then take up knitting
    I like white bikes
  • 1_reaper1_reaper Posts: 322
    Can't see the problem with the saddle and bars on the grass verge(if there is one) just going to get wet at worse and will dry and or wiped off. Job done
  • leflef Posts: 728
    ...okay i better stick to the knitting! So clearly two schools of thought on this one. I'm somewhat ocd about scratches, at least about the exoensive stuff. If its my commuter then yeah I'll chuck it wherever but my good bikes get looked after.

    So has anyone actually damaged the mech or mech hanger from doing this?
  • sheffsimonsheffsimon Posts: 1,282
    softlad wrote:
    I always rest the bike on the mech when dropping the rear wheel out - right or wrong, it's never been a problem...

    Same here, wont be a problem. Bit of grit on the chain isnt going to ruin your cassette, bikes are made of metal not cheese.
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    Or you could carry a repair stand on your back?
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • Just find a nice patch of grass and place it down drive side up. Wouldn't rest it on the rear mech, and wouldn't want to scuff the saddle/bars by upending, but thats just me.
    Limited Edition Boardman Team Carbon No. 448
    Boardman MTB Team
  • this is basically quite easy I carry a plastic bag in my saddle bag with 3 rubber bands,
    gloves of place one on each hood with an elastic band cover the saddle with the plastic bag and wrap a rubber band around the saddle ,then turn the bike upside down.

    jackthelad
  • sheffsimonsheffsimon Posts: 1,282
    jackthelad wrote:
    this is basically quite easy I carry a plastic bag in my saddle bag with 3 rubber bands,
    gloves of place one on each hood with an elastic band cover the saddle with the plastic bag and wrap a rubber band around the saddle ,then turn the bike upside down.

    jackthelad

    :shock:
  • bilirubinbilirubin Posts: 225
    jackthelad wrote:
    this is basically quite easy I carry a plastic bag in my saddle bag with 3 rubber bands,
    gloves of place one on each hood with an elastic band cover the saddle with the plastic bag and wrap a rubber band around the saddle ,then turn the bike upside down.

    jackthelad

    Looks like knitting for you then!!, please tell me you are winding us up, its a bike not a priceless antique.
  • bam49bam49 Posts: 158
    I usually rest my bike upside down on a patch of grass - if you are worried about the speedo then you can stick your gloves underneath it to avoid any scratches.. I then put on a pair of latex / surgical gloves ( a mate at work gets them off his hairdresser chum :) , not me honestly :oops: ), to actually change the tube etc , they are easy to carry & stop your hands getting covered in censored ...
  • feltkuotafeltkuota Posts: 333
    I always carry a sky hook.
  • bilirubin wrote:
    jackthelad wrote:
    this is basically quite easy I carry a plastic bag in my saddle bag with 3 rubber bands,
    gloves of place one on each hood with an elastic band cover the saddle with the plastic bag and wrap a rubber band around the saddle ,then turn the bike upside down.

    jackthelad

    Looks like knitting for you then!!, please tell me you are winding us up, its a bike not a priceless antique.

    why create damage when it can so easily be avoided,what weight is their in a small plastic bag and a couple of rubber bands
  • feltkuota wrote:
    I always carry a sky hook.

    +1 - essential equipment
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    Why not buy better tyres so your bike doesn't suffer punctures? Problem solved.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • softladsoftlad Posts: 3,513
    feltkuota wrote:
    I always carry a sky hook.

    I always levitate my bike off the ground using the force....
Sign In or Register to comment.