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Bendy bike for benders

rapid_uphillrapid_uphill Posts: 841
edited July 2010 in The bottom bracket
A bicycle with a flexible frame that can be wrapped around lamp-posts to be locked up has won a design prize, although im not sure why as it is totally pants.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/green-motoring/7885788/Bendy-bicycle-that-can-be-wrapped-round-lamp-posts-wins-design-prize.html?utm_source=tmg&utm_medium=TD_bendy&utm_campaign=moto1307am

bendybike01_1677654c.jpg
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  • Yes, but think about it, you could cycle to work and cycle home at the same time - that's got to be a real timesaver :wink:
  • CrapaudCrapaud Posts: 2,483
    Where an ordinary bicycle's frame would have the crossbar and down-tube, Mr Scott's design has two segmented tubes, containing a cable. When the cable is tightened, using a ratchet device below the saddle, the frame is rigid and can be cycled.
    I wouldn't want to be pelting downhill when the cable - as it must inevitavly do - snaps!
    A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject - Churchill
  • And if you look at the image, the only thing holding the bike in place is the D-lock around the front wheel. 2 nuts off the front wheel and the bike, already conveniently folded, is ready for chucking in the back of the van.
  • nottscobbnottscobb Posts: 147
    The bike in the picture has no brakes or gears either - conveniently avoiding the issue of what happens to the these cables when the bike is bent around the lamp post!
  • Mister WMister W Posts: 791
    This is the sort of concept that people take ideas from to put on new bikes, like car companies do with concept cars. You aren't ever going to see the full concept out on the road but ideas and technology from it makes its way into production cars.

    Unfortunately this designer is planning to put it into full production. Say goodbye to that cash you've just won :lol:
  • re-cyclesre-cycles Posts: 107
    nottscobb wrote:
    The bike in the picture has no brakes or gears either - conveniently avoiding the issue of what happens to the these cables when the bike is bent around the lamp post!
    Not quite sure why the cables would be an issue... If they were run along the side of the frame rather than the top then the bike would still be able to "bend" in one direction without stretching the cables?

    I'm not 100% convinced about the design myself, but I'm sure it'll appeal to some if the price is right.
  • ProssPross Posts: 31,637
    Ridiculous. No matter what the potential short comings are of the design it is no more secure (and probably less so) than D locking the frame to a column. Looks like a typical case of trying to overcome a problem that doesn't exist :?

    Might lack a bit of rigidity in a sprint too :wink:
  • PorgyPorgy Posts: 4,525
    Pross wrote:
    Ridiculous. No matter what the potential short comings are of the design it is no more secure (and probably less so) than D locking the frame to a column. Looks like a typical case of trying to overcome a problem that doesn't exist :?

    +1

    why would you make a compromise on the strength of you frame for such a non-problem as how much space it takes up on the pavement when locked up - or so you can D lock your wheels together!! what to save about £10 on buying a cable that can thread through your wheels - works just as well - probably cheaper that the extra expense of a bendy bike, and you won;t look like a censored having to ride it either.
  • freehubfreehub Posts: 4,257
    Bet the metal parts of the frame are cheap pieces of shite as well. I bet those wheels ain't true.
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,175
    Looks like a novel idea to me. He just needs to integrate the lock into the frame and I reckon that's not a bad basis for a city bike.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • Porgy wrote:
    why would you make a compromise on the strength of you frame for such a non-problem as how much space it takes up on the pavement when locked up - or so you can D lock your wheels together!!

    It doesn't even actually take up less space, since it's still a full-size bike, just swaps a 'long but narrow' shape for a 'short but squat' one.

    In fact it works less well if anything in popular bike-locking areas than normal bikes, where you can put one on each side of the post parallel to the kerb (ie flow of traffic). Trying to lock a 2nd bike to the post with all wheels parallel when that one's already there (or vice-versa) would be pretty difficult--meaning that one bike would have to be sticking out into the pavement or road
  • LillywhiteLillywhite Posts: 742
    Clearly designed by a non-cyclist. I wonder if he had help from Clive Sinclair. :lol:
  • shouldbeinbedshouldbeinbed Posts: 2,660
    so they've designed out the biggest thickest metal triangle on the bike that its most secure to lock a bike by.

    if space is such an issue ask Brompton, Birdy, Dahon,Moulton,Mezzo Airnimal etc if theyve got any ideas for solving it. theres also plenty of 26 inch wheelers that hinge already that are goint to be more stable in use.

    they've also got their head round cable routing too
  • LillywhiteLillywhite Posts: 742

    they've also got their head round cable routing too

    Exactly. The bke is not road legal as it stands.
  • pst88pst88 Posts: 621
    Put it this way: no one would want to steal it even if it wasn't locked because it's rubbish.
    Bianchi Via Nirone Veloce/Centaur 2010
  • rapid_uphillrapid_uphill Posts: 841
    I suppose it would fit in the boot of a car, which could be handy.
  • I think it's an interesting alternative approach.
    Clearly a bit of a Marmite concept from the comments so far...

    Baffling how several posters have written it off already, based on one picture :?



    "theres also plenty of 26 inch wheelers that hinge already that are goint to be more stable in use"

    "I wouldn't want to be pelting downhill when the cable - as it must inevitavly do - snaps!"


    Seems to be a lot of people who are suddenly experts in something they've never ever seen before :wink:
    Earn Cashback @ Wiggle, CRC, Evans, AW Cycles, Alpine Bikes, ProBikeKit, Cycles UK :

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  • LillywhiteLillywhite Posts: 742
    Baffling how several posters have written it off already, based on one picture :?



    Time will tell but I seriously wonder how much cycling experience the young lad who designed this bike has. Judging by the way bike thieves easily cut through cable locks they would have some fun with this bike but then I don't reckon it would be worth stealing in the first place. :wink:
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    Sometimes I really do wonder about the level of intelligence of the people who post on here..............

    There are a number of things to take into account when considering an informed and intelligent reply to the OP.

    1) This is a University design project. It's not Trek designing their next bike.
    2) The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    3) The design project is not there to assess the student's ability to design a bike, it's there to assess the student's understanding of design processes, techniques and tools.

    Hats off to the guy, he's done a good job.

    As for some of the comments, especially the one about the cables............ engage brain before typing.
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • LillywhiteLillywhite Posts: 742
    MattC59 wrote:

    Hats off to the guy, he's done a good job.

    That's a matter of opinion since he's attempting to market the idea.
  • MonkeypumpMonkeypump Posts: 1,528
    MattC59 wrote:
    Sometimes I really do wonder about the level of intelligence of the people who post on here..............

    There are a number of things to take into account when considering an informed and intelligent reply to the OP.

    1) This is a University design project. It's not Trek designing their next bike.
    2) The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    3) The design project is not there to assess the student's ability to design a bike, it's there to assess the student's understanding of design processes, techniques and tools.

    Hats off to the guy, he's done a good job.

    As for some of the comments, especially the one about the cables............ engage brain before typing.

    A little condescending, perhaps?

    Anyway, as a design exercise this may well be deemed a 'success' by those in the position of judging, but as pointed out above - it's design for design's sake.

    The 'solution' is for a non-problem, the design introduces problems which didn't exist before, and there is little likelihood of translation into real-world sales.

    All-in-all, it seems a bit of a folly.
  • White LineWhite Line Posts: 887
    edited July 2010
    So now all you have to do is cut the cables on the top tube and down tube? I'm sure they'd be easy to replace. The D-lock is pointless.

    Studying the course as this guy, I can say that it's a good idea, but just not though out well enough and is destined for failure.
    MattC59 wrote:
    The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    Pretty sure his main goal would have been to make it hard to steal; not to make a bike that bends. Rubber bike. Done. You can't ride it, but it bends really well. :roll:
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    Monkeypump wrote:
    MattC59 wrote:
    Sometimes I really do wonder about the level of intelligence of the people who post on here..............

    There are a number of things to take into account when considering an informed and intelligent reply to the OP.

    1) This is a University design project. It's not Trek designing their next bike.
    2) The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    3) The design project is not there to assess the student's ability to design a bike, it's there to assess the student's understanding of design processes, techniques and tools.

    Hats off to the guy, he's done a good job.

    As for some of the comments, especially the one about the cables............ engage brain before typing.

    A little condescending, perhaps?

    Anyway, as a design exercise this may well be deemed a 'success' by those in the position of judging, but as pointed out above - it's design for design's sake.

    The 'solution' is for a non-problem, the design introduces problems which didn't exist before, and there is little likelihood of translation into real-world sales.

    All-in-all, it seems a bit of a folly.
    You're missing the point, it's not design for design's sake, it's design to prove the individuals understanding of the design process, nothing more.

    Condescending, probably, but if you post a reply which leaves you wide open to such comments, then you have to expect someone to comment accordingly.
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • CrapaudCrapaud Posts: 2,483
    MattC59 wrote:
    Sometimes I really do wonder about the level of intelligence of the people who post on here..............

    There are a number of things to take into account when considering an informed and intelligent reply to the OP.

    1) This is a University design project. It's not Trek designing their next bike.
    2) The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    3) The design project is not there to assess the student's ability to design a bike, it's there to assess the student's understanding of design processes, techniques and tools.

    Hats off to the guy, he's done a good job.

    As for some of the comments, especially the one about the cables............ engage brain before typing.
    Why? What's wrong with it? Plenty of things fail, eventually, through fatigue / wear. I wouldn't want to be on a bike where the frame suddenly became as rigid as a cheese string.

    Incidentally, he was designing a bike - he's taking it to market. As such he'll probably appreciate the thoughts and concerns so that he can address them and allay a potential purchaser's fears. For me it'd be what would happen when the cable or ratchet failed.
    A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject - Churchill
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    White Line wrote:
    So now all you have to do is cut the cables on the top tube and down tube? I'm sure they'd be easy to replace. The D-lock is pointless.

    Studying the course as this guy, I can say that it's a good idea, but just not though out well enough and is destined for failure.
    Monkeypump wrote:
    The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    Pretty sure his main goal would have been to make it hard to steal; not to make a bike that bends. Rubber bike. Done. You can't ride it, but it bends really well. :roll:
    If you can't ride it, it's not a bike :roll: :wink:
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • guillianoguilliano Posts: 5,495
    I can imagine it would be pretty heavy, having steel cables that run through small pieces of tubing that interlock when the cables are tightened. As for being road legal.... if it's a fixie it needs no brakes to be allowed on the road surely?
  • rapid_uphillrapid_uphill Posts: 841
    edited July 2010
    here is some better pics:

    article-1292986-0A5AA91A000005DC-918_470x423.jpg

    article-1292986-0A5AA9DD000005DC-459_470x423.jpg

    article-1292986-0A5AA905000005DC-852_470x750.jpg

    article-1292986-0A5AA91E000005DC-181_470x750.jpg
  • MonkeypumpMonkeypump Posts: 1,528
    White Line wrote:
    So now all you have to do is cut the cables on the top tube and down tube? I'm sure they'd be easy to replace. The D-lock is pointless.

    Studying the course as this guy, I can say that it's a good idea, but just not though out well enough and is destined for failure.
    Monkeypump wrote:
    The student wasn't designing a bike, but a method of making the bike flexible.
    Pretty sure his main goal would have been to make it hard to steal; not to make a bike that bends. Rubber bike. Done. You can't ride it, but it bends really well. :roll:

    I didn't write that!
  • MonkeypumpMonkeypump Posts: 1,528
    MattC59 wrote:
    You're missing the point, it's not design for design's sake, it's design to prove the individuals understanding of the design process, nothing more.

    I'm not sure there's a difference.

    Either way, judging from the comments on this thread (where the posters are likely to represent a cross-section of potential customers), the bike may well be orange but it's future is not looking bright...
  • White LineWhite Line Posts: 887
    Monkeypump wrote:
    I didn't write that!
    Whoops! Seems I deleted the wrong part when I copy and pasted the whole post. :oops: Fixed now. :)

    Also, the designer is clearly not a cyclist. Look at that saddle height. Plus, everybody knows that the bars shouldn't be that wide on such a bike. :roll:
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