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Going from complete novice to Mega-Avalanche

Tango_nutsTango_nuts Posts: 3
edited July 2010 in MTB beginners
... in 13 months

Hi all, long time lurker here...

Recently started new job and met some new colleagues who are really into there MTB's and have done competitions etc. all over Europe.

There's talk afoot now of attempting Mega Avalanche next year - I've only been out on my bike with them once and absolutely loved it, so I'm now working on getting to a decent level solo as they are running much higher level stuff than me (I had a go at what they called a training run and nearly crapped myself!)

Is it possible to work up to a good enough level for Mega Avalanche in such a short period of time? Would it be worth upgrading from my bike (2008 HT Felt Q620) to http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Felt_ ... 360049677/? Would the Redemption be suitable for a MTB beginner? I'm guessing fitness is a very important factor? I currently do a bit of road cycling (Around 80 miles a week) just to keep what little fitness I have (A lot of a beer belly going on!)

Posts

  • omegasomegas Posts: 970
    If you have the time , money , commitment and can stay injury free it can be done.

    I would question why you want to do it after one time out riding with friends, maybe better to ride off road for a few months and then rethink what you want out of your new hobby .
  • omegas wrote:
    If you have the time , money , commitment and can stay injury free it can be done.

    I would question why you want to do it after one time out riding with friends, maybe better to ride off road for a few months and then rethink what you want out of your new hobby .

    Oops, I have only ridden with them once but have enjoyed light MTB (Well, I thought it was fairly tough stuff!) for quite some time, and they just showed me how it's done, and it sort of just clicked that I really would quite like to do it!

    Thanks for the response :)
  • omegasomegas Posts: 970
    Start with some easy competitive rides throughout this year as you might find you hate it.
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 15,475
    edited June 2010
    Definately true that.

    I think skillswise it'll be challenging but perfectly possible, in about 18 months I've gone from blue-route terror to doing the world cup downhill route on a trailbike, with a few months off for injury, and though I'm pretty decent I'm not "gifted" or anything like that, I just kept riding and kept challenging myself. So I'm sure pretty much anyone could do it if I could ;) The question is, do you want to? I'm confident I could put in a fair performance at the mega, might be able to qualify for the main event on a good day, I just find I've no desire to.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • peter413peter413 Posts: 5,120
    I went from being terified of doing anything on the blue routes about 14 months ago to what I am now, determined to thrash the Innerleithen DH stuff. I should mention that 13 months ago I broke my leg which dented my confidence even more but I went out riding with other people who were very suportive and put up with all my whining and now I keep up with them most of the time, sometimes am quicker.

    I as well am not a very gifted rider but I just practice practice practice and push my limits all the time.

    I always find following quicker riders makes you push yourself and then the next time, I am just as quick on my own :D
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    first ride on an MTB to doing the megavalanche sounds like "I went for a nice walk in the park the other day, and I really enjoyed it. Now I want to go up Everest"

    Seriously get out on th bike more, off road first, the Megavalanche is a challenge and a half.
  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    first ride on an MTB to doing the megavalanche sounds like "I went for a nice walk in the park the other day, and I really enjoyed it. Now I want to go up Everest"
    .

    +1 on that,

    However there are some people out there with the determination, money and time to get stuff like this done.

    So first thing I would do is go upto fort william for a weekend and hit the red (and if you do nto crash) the black DH run there. rent a BIG bike and armour so you do not get hurt.

    Do you have the balls to do it?

    If so, bike training courses, weekends at Fort William and spending you free time doing learning techniques.

    Your bike is nice, but if you have £4k to throw on a bike, go for it.

    Keep us posted, i would love to see someone do this!


    subscribing to either the biggest win or fail in ages!
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    Thinking about it sticking some higher quality wheels on that bike would help.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 15,475
    I can't compare with the mega at all but a mate of mine's done it a couple of times and reckons the nevis red rather than offbeat DH is the best training for it in the UK, more in keeping with the megavalanche terrain. Second hand advice though obviously.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • HyufskoHyufsko Posts: 37
    If you want to get better you are going to have to ride more and push more. Dont be afriad of bailing because its gonna happen at some point. Some stuff on a bike is like diving of a high board. You just gotta go for it. So go for it.
    _______________________

    Specialized FSRxc Comp '10
  • nferrarnferrar Posts: 2,511
    I'd get yourself on a skills course, Tony @ UK Bike Skills is always highly recommended, it's surprising how much even experienced riders can pick up. Then once you know what you're supposed to do you can practice it properly in the months of prep time you have.
  • pauljoespauljoes Posts: 186
    Don`t worry, "if in doubt hit it flat out" that will be your answer to everything on the trails :D
    TREK REMEDY 9
    ORANGE CRUSH
    DOLAN TUONO
    PLANET X PRO CARBON
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 15,475
    That works up to a point. Unfortunately when you reach that point, you die instantly :lol:
    Uncompromising extremist
  • pauljoespauljoes Posts: 186
    but you die doing something you enjoy, and not sat at a desk!
    TREK REMEDY 9
    ORANGE CRUSH
    DOLAN TUONO
    PLANET X PRO CARBON
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    more impressive for future generations to remember you dying by hitting a tree at 50mph, 40 feet off the floor, than for dying of old age :lol:
  • captainflycaptainfly Posts: 1,001
    Getting the skills and the bike will probably be the easier part getting fit enough will be hard. Unless you have been (rock) climbing and road riding for years, it may be tough to have the downhill stamina, especially in the upperbody, I reckon a tailored gym routine four or five times a week, some off road running and a powerball, gripmaster and other hand strenghtening stuff combined with a mix of XC and downhill biking several times a week, might get you there in a year, give it two or three years and you won't have to train like a pro athlete 8)
    -_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
    Mongoose Teocali
    Giant STP0

    Why are MTB economics; spend twice as much as you intended, but only half as much as you wish you could afford? :roll:
  • What if you love your desk and then die whilst counting paper clips...heaven!! ;-)
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