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MTB Shoes

Jonnycrawford7Jonnycrawford7 Posts: 56
edited June 2010 in MTB beginners
Just a quick question, baring in mind that im a total novice i apologise if this is a silly question,

Can the mtb shoes which are designed to be used with clipless pedals still be used on flat pedals?

Its just i need some mtb shoes and dont feel im ready to start using clipless pedals yet, but if i can use the shoes on flat pedals it saves me buying an extra pair of shoes just for my flat pedals while i get my confidence up!

Cheers
2010 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp

2012 Cannondale Caad8 Tiagra

Posts

  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Oh for god's sake. Enough with the whole
    dont feel im ready to start using clipless pedals yet
    You don't have to EVER switch. Don't feel pressured by the blowhards. If at some point you want to give it a go, fine, but there's nothing wrong with flats.

    I'm sorry, but this really annoys me when so many people push the attitude of "if you don't ride spuds you're not a real MTBer" It's personal preference, simple as that.
  • Im well aware its a personal choice, its the thought that they make you a more efficient rider that appeals to me. But i didnt ask should i or shouldnt i switch to clipless pedals, i know ill try them eventually which is why i wanted to know if clipless shoes work on both pedals?
    2010 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp

    2012 Cannondale Caad8 Tiagra
  • kaytronikakaytronika Posts: 580
    Definately don't feel forced to switch. I use SPDs as it's my preference.
    In answer to your question, MTB shoes have a stiff sole and can be used with regular pedals. They're a bit off for walking in, but the stiff sole works well for pedalling in.
    --
    '09 Carrera Fury
    '94 GT Timberline FS
    '89 Saracen Tufftrax
  • Great thanks, thats all i needed to know! i shouldnt be walking far in them anyway, garage and back hopefully!
    2010 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp

    2012 Cannondale Caad8 Tiagra
  • kaytronikakaytronika Posts: 580
    I usually walk in to the cafe for some cake... Cleats make me sound like some sort of outlaw.

    Or a really censored tap dancer. :lol:
    --
    '09 Carrera Fury
    '94 GT Timberline FS
    '89 Saracen Tufftrax
  • omegasomegas Posts: 970
    You can use shoes designed for cleats on flat pedals but they don’t give the best of grip with or without the plates.

    Sometimes I swap to V8 flats and use my cleated mountain bike shoes when messing about on the pump track which are ok but not fantastic grip.

    For serious riding I use SPD,s :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
  • haha i'll take the outlaw image over the tap dancer i think! Although if im completly honest id be better as a tap dancer than an outlaw :(
    2010 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp

    2012 Cannondale Caad8 Tiagra
  • jonny

    just my experience but others may have more knowledge as i have little experience riding flats.

    my old shimano shoes had a softer ruberier grips/ sole and provided better grip than my new more plasticier sidi ones.

    may need to bear this in mind when purchasing
    Cheers

    Colin
  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,203
    The first cycling shoes i ever bought were Vans style flats which were great on flat pedals and when I bought some SPD pedals you could cut a specific section of the sole out and fit the cleats. I think they might have been made by Shimano but can't be sure...
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • CraziScotCraziScot Posts: 66
    I've got some 661 Filters to use for clipless, cleats are hidden up in the sole so no clicking when walking, look like skate shoes, not too stiff to walk in but best of all out of the box the cleat holes are covered by a tear out rubber section so you can ride them on flats. :D

    As to the not being ready, I've only been clipped in for about 4-5 months, at first I was pooing myself as I used to dab my foot loads etc worrying I would fall off. I did fall three or four times but mostly just stupid slow speed topples, now I'm much more likely to stay upright and work though tough terrain. Spent the last week on flats for one reason and another, what a horror show, I felt uneasy on the pedals, no where near as confident riding the rough stuff, putting in twice the effort for half return, and don't even start me on hopping off the pedals! Just my experience though.
  • ChronicbintChronicbint Posts: 172
    Decent trainers are fine for flats, don't need to buy any special needs shoes.
  • hounslowhounslow Posts: 153
    Decent trainers are fine for flats, don't need to buy any special needs shoes.
    30e9e8a8.jpg
    black one is a 2 week old nike from jdsports, gum rubber one is a 5 month old nike6.0 nigel sylvester bmx shoe.

    point being, normal shoes get torn to censored from pedals. get skate/bmx/mtb shoes.
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    or five tens... the definitive mtb flat shoe.

    Personally I don't like spds off-road unless it's for a really dull training ride or cx. Flats are more fun for jumping etc. which is why i ride my mtb - fun.
  • I am also new to mtbs (ish2) - bought the bike 2 years ago and only done 500 miles! I have just bought some cycling trainers from Lidl, there is a cover secured by an allen key, I am using them on a flat pedal, do I leave this in or take it out?
  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,203
    leave it in, that is where you would fit the cleat if you were going for SPD's.
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • monkeylizardmonkeylizard Posts: 155
    Leaving aside the SPD/flats argument...

    I started out on flats wearing trainers and after a couple of months tried SPDs as I thought it was the done thing. I didn't get on with being clipped in so changed back to flats and removed the cleats from the SPD shoes - not great in terms of grip but not noticeably different to trainers.

    Although I was slipping of the pedals a few times per ride I put this down to bad technique as much as the shoes. I've now changed to Five Tens (as a result of one slip off the pedals putting me in hospital - long story :lol: ) and the difference is huge.

    I'm really not one to believe the hype when it comes to anything, but the difference between SPD shoes on flat pedals and Five Tens is like comparing Pritt Stick and Superglue.
  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,203
    Decent trainers are fine for flats, don't need to buy any special needs shoes.

    I completely disagree with this, the stiffer soles of cycling shoes make a huge difference.
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • GHillGHill Posts: 2,402
    For the original question, depends on the shoe. Some are essentially smooth plastic on the bottom, which isn't great for gripping to flat pedals (and will get scratched).
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