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Weird discrepancy from climbing to flats

fastercyclistfastercyclist Posts: 396
As title. I climb much stronger then I can cycle on flat ground - disproportionately to almost all the other cyclists I've cycled with. I'm 5 foot 11 and 156 lbs so hardly a racing snake. Around 8 lbs overweight! :shock:

I would really appreciate advice on how I can up my "diesel". I find in races I can drop people anywhere I want to, but cannot beat average speed of Peloton - did a chain gang the other night and got tortured with an average heart rate of 177 over an hour but I could put out fast accelerations still. Got about 6 months of cycling in my legs if that makes any difference (1800 miles).
The British Empire never died, it just moved to the Velodrome

Posts

  • softladsoftlad Posts: 3,513
    if you are winning races, then I wouldn't worry too much.

    Some people are simply better suited to one discipline than another. Plus, a single rider is unlikely ever to be able to outpace a bunch riding at speed - unless they are significantly stronger or if the bunch is sitting up...
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    Erm - 5 foot 11 and weighing 156 lbs IS a racing snake!!!


    No wonder you go up hills fast. At 70KG taking into account your height - you weigh less than many pros do!


    (I'm 5'11 and 180 lbs and I go faster on the flats. I wonder why?)
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I weigh 70kg but I'm only 5'6", so to me you'd be the very definition of a racing snake.

    I'm more of a touring piglet.
  • BarteosBarteos Posts: 657
    Sounds like you may have a moderate power output but very good power to weight ratio.
    Grab a bike with a power meter and do some testing (FTP).
    You'll know where you are :)
  • ut_och_cyklaut_och_cykla Posts: 1,594
    I suspect its a matter of W/kg. You perhaps dont generate as many Watts as others so on the flat you are struggling a bit, but on the hills your relative light weight means you can get up them easier than your slightly heavier group members.

    Eg (made up numbers :) You can generate 250W at threshold 250/70 = 3,57W/kg
    Club mate generates 300W but weighs 90kg = 3,33W/kg

    You need to improve your speed on the flat - more Watts - perhaps using appropiate intervals eg 5 x 4:4 or 2 x 20 mins. As long as you dont go up in weight this will help you climb even faster too - but it could be your lower weight is a slight hinder to pumping out Watts according to this http://www.endurancecorner.com/strength_and_endurance
    But perhaps someone else has a better take on this .... :)
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    I suspect its a matter of W/kg. You perhaps dont generate as many Watts as others so on the flat you are struggling a bit, but on the hills your relative light weight means you can get up them easier than your slightly heavier group members.

    Aerodynamics too, I suspect you may be very unaerodynamic, so as the speeds drop, the relative advantage of the more watts helps.

    Where's a photo of you on your road bike?
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    You've only been cycling for 6 months, your body isn't really accustomed to cycling yet. But you've got the lungs and strength to do bursts very well and are just lacking the practice to churn along.
  • fastercyclistfastercyclist Posts: 396
    jibberjim wrote:
    I suspect its a matter of W/kg. You perhaps dont generate as many Watts as others so on the flat you are struggling a bit, but on the hills your relative light weight means you can get up them easier than your slightly heavier group members.

    Aerodynamics too, I suspect you may be very unaerodynamic, so as the speeds drop, the relative advantage of the more watts helps.

    Where's a photo of you on your road bike?

    In the black.

    ryanracing.jpg

    I'll read that article now thanks ut_och_cykla.
    The British Empire never died, it just moved to the Velodrome
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    I think its the peak on your helmet slowing you down.
    More problems but still living....
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    In the black.

    So, yes, you're pretty upright there, get in the drops for a start, and try and get yourself out of the wind, when you're not on a wheel, you need to be low and flat and as aerodynamic as possible.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • shockedsoshockedshockedsoshocked Posts: 4,021
    Being strong in hills doesn't equate to speed on the flats (despite popular belief).

    Hit the flat rides, go hard, ride into the wind, it'll bring you on. Different kind of riding hard.
    "A cyclist has nothing to lose but his chain"

    PTP Runner Up 2015
  • oldwelshmanoldwelshman Posts: 4,733
  • fastercyclistfastercyclist Posts: 396
    Being strong in hills doesn't equate to speed on the flats (despite popular belief).

    Hit the flat rides, go hard, ride into the wind, it'll bring you on. Different kind of riding hard.

    Cheers guys, I'll incorporate 2 x 20 minute intervals on a flat section nearby into my routine.
    The British Empire never died, it just moved to the Velodrome
  • vorsprungvorsprung Posts: 1,953
    I live in Devon too, and funnily enough I go better on the hills
  • phil sphil s Posts: 1,128
    Is your bike too small? Looks like you should be a lot longer and lower across the top than you are in that picture.

    And, yeah, lose the peak on the helmet.
    -- Dirk Hofman Motorhomes --
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Here's your big mistake right here!

    ryanracing.jpg

    You should be behind Robin drafting on the flat (heh heh, you two really do look like batman and robin :shock: )
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