Anyone running two top road bikes...?

bristolpete
bristolpete Posts: 2,255
edited March 2010 in Road buying advice
I have been pondering another road bike, only pondering, but it got me wondering, aside from the winter thing, is anyone running dual or even more bikes?

If yes, do you target specific rides on a certain machine? Furthermore, if you have to validate them how do you answer people when they ask two road bikes?

Thanks in advance,

Pete.
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Comments

  • sturmey
    sturmey Posts: 964
    Plenty of people run two or more expensive roadbikes.
    Don't feel you have to justify it.
    Just buy another.
    It's only money.
  • Wheelspinner
    Wheelspinner Posts: 6,604
    You mean there are people out there with only ONE good bike!?!?!? :lol:

    Let's see...
    1. Carbon race bike for those trips through the hilly bits, and longer rides generally. (Pinarello Paris FP, full Campag Chorus carbon, Ksyrium SL)
    2. Carbon TT bike, even though you may as well measure my TT speed with a calendar instead of a stopwatch. :D (Pinarello FT1, Dura Ace, Reynolds wheels)
    3. Alloy frame, carbon fork race bik (Principia RSL) converted to flat bar road for days when I am out riding with friends for fun, coffee, lunch, whatever, when outright speed is not important. (Dura Ace drivetrain, Ksyrium Elite wheels). Could be my favourite bike, a hoot to ride!
    4. Another one like 3, Fondriest Top Level aluminium with carbon fork, wild custom paint job, flat bars but with Campag Chorus drivetrain and Eurus wheels. For days when I feel like being noticed.. 8)

    There's more. These are the "good" ones...

    You can never have too many bikes! Who needs to be able to justify that?
    Open One+ BMC TE29 Seven 622SL On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • APIII
    APIII Posts: 2,010
    Yes, I've got two top end bikes, but no, I don't have to validate/justify them or whatever.
  • mrushton
    mrushton Posts: 5,182
    2 here, plus a custom steel winter bike, a Pompino and a Trek MTB plus there are my partners bikes. No need for validation but unfortunately we don't have room for more otherwise (like a number of people on this forum), we would keep on going. There is always something else out there
    M.Rushton
  • bristolpete
    bristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Thanks all.

    I know, its a real paradox but I worry about it.

    I am going to get a Cervelo to go with my FP3 - build it up slowly, but dont want to end up in a Harry Hill fight over the two bikes with myself, not knowing which to ride and when but figure I will figure that when I ride them, if that makes sense.

    Pete.
  • Westerberg
    Westerberg Posts: 652
    I'm desperately strapped for cash and am living hand to mouth. Needless to say I'm just about to splash out 2.5k on a new bike. It's akin to a crack addiction I feel.
  • bristolpete
    bristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Westerberg wrote:
    I'm desperately strapped for cash and am living hand to mouth. Needless to say I'm just about to splash out 2.5k on a new bike. It's akin to a crack addiction I feel.

    Classic.

    Yep, too true. The thing is we feel and see the differences in bikes, others do not, hence my opening gambit. It seems most people think fuck them however!
  • Westerberg
    Westerberg Posts: 652
    well...to be fair, it'll only be my second bike, and my first carbon (decent) bike. So I'm not feeling too bad!

    Nice photos btw. I'm from Bristol also so some familiar sights.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Get yourself a "too good to race" bike and therefore it warrants a decent race bike i.e. one that you wouldn't be heartbroken to throw down the road. From there you can build on a training bike, fixed, single speed, TT, cyclo-cross etc. I have six at present.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    I "live" in North Wales and In Manchester.

    So I have a carbon bike (+ 3 Al alloy bikes) in Wales, and a Titanium bike in Manchester. Neither are particularly expensive bikes, but each probably cost more than a lot of people spend on a bike.

    It's only so that I don't have to carry bikes about though, and I just ride whatever bike I have with me at the time. But the Ti bike would be considered my "race bike" if I was to ever square my sh!t away and get fit enough to race.
    I like bikes...

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  • trtimothy
    trtimothy Posts: 117
    have a trek madone 5.2 with zipp 404 clinchers with powertap for training

    cervelo s2 with zipp 606 tub wheels for racing

    cervelo p4 with ffwrd wheels for TTs

    and no nobody has ever asked me to justify it (except the parents when they find out where the student loan has gone!)
  • dbg
    dbg Posts: 846
    My current bestest bike is a Scott Addict, my previous bestest now relegated to crappy weather day bike is a full carbon LeMond. Oh and I recently bought a Trek 6700 mtn bike. No more room in the garage so that's it for me!
  • kingrollo
    kingrollo Posts: 3,198
    I currently have 3 road bikes. 1 is my commutter\hack the other are my best bikes - but one has to be sold, I just can not justify having around £500 tied up in bike that won't get much use.
  • sampras38
    sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    At the moment I have 2, but only one I would consider a top road bike. I have a carbon Scott CR1 Pro with a few upgrades and fulcum racing wheels coming soon, plus an entry level Trek 1.2 that I use in the winter and on the turbo (spare wheel).
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    Westerberg - save yourself 1500 and buy a one grand bike. You wont notice the difference in the bike and you can spend the rest on stuff that you would appreciate - like nice kit, or a training holiday in the alps.
  • flanners1
    flanners1 Posts: 916
    The more the merrier, I use different bikes on different rides, training, weather, sportives etc. I like owning a few and variety is the spice of life.
    Colnago C60 SRAM eTap, Colnago C40, Milani 107E, BMC Pro Machine, Trek Madone, Viner Gladius,
    Bizango 29er
  • Westerberg
    Westerberg Posts: 652
    cougie wrote:
    Westerberg - save yourself 1500 and buy a one grand bike. You wont notice the difference in the bike and you can spend the rest on stuff that you would appreciate - like nice kit, or a training holiday in the alps.

    thanks - problem I see is that I don't think £1k will buy me an appreciably better bike than the one I own - which is fine, but a bit heavy and tends to rattle bones on longer rides. £1k might buy a carbon frame but with crummy wheels and groupset. I'd rather spend a bit more and not have bad wheels / groupset dragging down an excellent frame.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I have 3 'good' bikes but not 'top'.

    Top would involve Lightweight wheels...
  • Lig
    Lig Posts: 178
    Hi Pete,

    I can't really see your logic.. I have two bikes but I made a point of not going down the two carbon frame route, so that they would deffo be different.

    My best bike is a Cervelo R3SL with Record and Zipps and my 'training' bike is a Colnago with carbon rear seat stays, Record/Chorus/Centaur and Easton EA70s. I really do love them both. The Cervelo for the performance, but the Colnago for the heritage!!

    IF I were you try and get a good old (but not that old say 2005-2008ish) traditional 'exclusive' Italian beauty (Colnago, Cinelli, Coppi) and then have your best really smart bike....

    My thinking was if you have two similar bikes, you will like one over the other and always want to ride that one!!

    This is just in my humble opinion and the route I took....however if you have won the lottery then buy lots!!!

    Lig..
  • bristolpete
    bristolpete Posts: 2,255
    edited March 2010
    Lig wrote:
    Hi Pete,

    I can't really see your logic.. I have two bikes but I made a point of not going down the two carbon frame route, so that they would deffo be different.

    My best bike is a Cervelo R3SL with Record and Zipps and my 'training' bike is a Colnago with carbon rear seat stays, Record/Chorus/Centaur and Easton EA70s. I really do love them both. The Cervelo for the performance, but the Colnago for the heritage!!

    IF I were you try and get a good old (but not that old say 2005-2008ish) traditional 'exclusive' Italian beauty (Colnago, Cinelli, Coppi) and then have your best really smart bike....

    My thinking was if you have two similar bikes, you will like one over the other and always want to ride that one!!

    This is just in my humble opinion and the route I took....however if you have won the lottery then buy lots!!!

    Lig..

    Its a valid point - I take it on board and I agree.

    I have not won the lottery. I do a lot of cash work photo wise which leaves me a nice bit of disposable income and pin money. I have decided to sit on things for a while (excuse the pun) but will likely test ride a Cervelo S2 / S3 in the coming months.

    In the best worst case scenario, I see my FP3 becoming my winter bike but thats another story.

    Just to say, I hope this thread never sounded bombastic. Historically, I have had terrible battles with depression, suicide attempts etc. However, since I found road cycling back in March 2008 I have never looked back. Simple as that. Cycling literally saved me. In fact I want to fast forward and enjoy my bikes/time/money as much as I can. Long story, but I am sure people get the picture. It seems there are lots of people in the same boat.

    Thanks for the comments all.

    Pete.
  • bristolpete
    bristolpete Posts: 2,255
    NapoleonD wrote:
    I have 3 'good' bikes but not 'top'.

    Top would involve Lightweight wheels...

    Surely your S2 can be classed as a top bike?
  • kingrollo
    kingrollo Posts: 3,198
    Lig wrote:
    Hi Pete,

    I can't really see your logic.. I have two bikes but I made a point of not going down the two carbon frame route, so that they would deffo be different.

    My best bike is a Cervelo R3SL with Record and Zipps and my 'training' bike is a Colnago with carbon rear seat stays, Record/Chorus/Centaur and Easton EA70s. I really do love them both. The Cervelo for the performance, but the Colnago for the heritage!!

    IF I were you try and get a good old (but not that old say 2005-2008ish) traditional 'exclusive' Italian beauty (Colnago, Cinelli, Coppi) and then have your best really smart bike....

    My thinking was if you have two similar bikes, you will like one over the other and always want to ride that one!!

    This is just in my humble opinion and the route I took....however if you have won the lottery then buy lots!!!

    Lig..

    Its a valid point - I take it on board and I agree.

    I have not won the lottery. I do a lot of cash work photo wise which leaves me a nice bit of disposable income and pin money. I have decided to sit on things for a while (excuse the pun) but will likely test ride a Cervelo S2 / S3 in the coming months.

    In the best worst case scenario, I see my FP3 becoming my winter bike but thats another story.

    Just to say, I hope this thread never sounded bombastic. Historically, I have had terrible battles with depression, suicide attempts etc. However, since I found road cycling back in March 2008 I have never looked back. Simple as that. Cycling literally saved me. In fact I want to fast forward and enjoy my bikes/time/money as much as I can. Long story, but I am sure people get the picture. It seems there are lots of people in the same boat.

    Thanks for the comments all.

    Pete.


    Similar to me, I suffered with depression - I never got to suicide - but there were long years when I just couldn't see a way out. My dream of being big legged, lean cyclist, roaring around on a carbon bike with zipp wheels , kept me going. I would always come back from a ride, with a chink of light at the end of the tunnel.
    Its mostly behind me know - but I do sometimes look at cycling as in investment in my mental health
    One of the worst things with the big 'd' - is that no one understands for example if you get cancer (don't get me wrong is terrible illness) you get time of work, sympathy, - where as depression - you get told to pull yourself together.
  • tigerben
    tigerben Posts: 233
    I have just taken delivery of my 5.2 Madone and whilst I love it I have already started thinking about my next bike. Whilst I cannot justify another carbon racer I can justify either a single speed steel bike or a tourer to replace my flat bar commuter.

    I did try and focus my desire to buy another bike on building a bike for the missus (I thought it was a winner - satisfy my bike buying urges and get brownie points at the same time!) Unfortunately the apathy of the girlfriend meant this was doomed to failure.

    For me half the fun is the looking / researching and the thinking about buying rather than the actual buying - so it will be a good 6 -12 months before i commit to anything.
  • I had the "misfourtune" to win a Cannondale R4000 in '97 just after I'd ordered a custom build steel frame. I decided to go ahead with the custom frame anyway, which I used for TT's and then used the 'dale for road racing.

    I've since sold the 'dale and replaced it with a carbon frame, but still have the custom steel. I haven't raced for years, but go carbon if I want to go fast (or should that read go as fast as I can, which is actually quite slow) or use the steel if I want to just plod along.

    I like the contrast between the two, both are great to ride, very different and I'm not sure I'd want to just have one "summer" road bike.

    Not sure I'd want two top end carbon frames, rather have something that's a bit different, but it doesn't really matter. As long as your riding and enjoying yourself, that's all that counts :D
  • iain_j
    iain_j Posts: 1,941
    kingrollo wrote:
    One of the worst things with the big 'd' - is that no one understands for example if you get cancer (don't get me wrong is terrible illness) you get time of work, sympathy, - where as depression - you get told to pull yourself together.

    Definitely agree with this.

    It seems that mental illness isn't taken seriously by a lot of people, as if it's not really illness, it's just an excuse. Maybe it's because it can't be physically seen. See someone in a wheelchair or hobbling round with their leg in plaster, or someone going through chemo, with no hair or eyebrows, there it is, right in front of you. No need for them to explain any further. But someone with depression? It's so easy for someone to say "look, there's nothing wrong with you, just cheer up".
  • Slow1972
    Slow1972 Posts: 362
    + 1 too.

    It seems that mental illness isn't taken seriously by a lot of people

    That includes the government (and previous ones), for something that affects so many it's historically been horrendously underfunded with no proper strategy, save for throwing pills at people.

    My wife has suffered with depression previously - I've found the variation in attitude within the medical profession is bad enough, so expecting the general public to understand or empathise is even less realisitic.

    Tbh, I think the only way a person can understand is to have it or live with or spend a reasonable amount of time with someone who has. I didn't take it seriously or fully appreciate its effects until I experienced it at close quarters.

    Physical illness or incapacity is more tangible and therefore a lot easier to understand.
  • DIESELDOG
    DIESELDOG Posts: 2,087
    Depression is a vile illness. My brother in law took his life last Thursday, he was never into cycling and never would have either, shame. Trying to get my OH though out but struggling, that was until Jimmy Cambridge dragged him out on Monday and didn't batter him. That made him feel better, thanks Jimmy. xx
    Eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

    www.onemanandhisbike.co.uk
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    tigerben wrote:
    For me half the fun is the looking / researching and the thinking about buying rather than the actual buying - so it will be a good 6 -12 months before i commit to anything.


    I'm with you on this - its the daydreaming about the perfect bike, and somehow when you've bought it and spent the cash - it cant possibly live up to the expectation. I'm OK with this now so I'm not even doing the daydreaming thing - I'm perfectly happy physically riding the bikes - thats the best fun by far.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    NapoleonD wrote:
    I have 3 'good' bikes but not 'top'.

    Top would involve Lightweight wheels...

    Surely your S2 can be classed as a top bike?

    I suppose, but funnily enough, the frame on my winter/trainer was more expensive...