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hills on a road bike after an mtb - gearing difference

mouse5mouse5 Posts: 22
edited November 2009 in Training, fitness and health
took up cycling 6 months ago after buying a Carrera Fury MTB - only used it on road and am now thinking of getting a road bike (boardman team carbon) as I want to do sportives and racing. Am gradually getting fitter and totally hooked on cycling now - doing hills I couldn't manage before. What I'm not sure about is will I find the hills harder on the different gearing of the Boardman (50x34, 12-25) as I am using the granny gear on my Carrera (11-32, 22-32-44). There is a big weight difference in the Mtb (32.5lb with pannier and bag) - compared to Team Carbon(17.6lb )

Posts

  • I def noticed a diff going from a mtb to road bike with the same 50/34 12/25 gearing, and bigger rolling radius wheels.

    The good thing is once you get fit on your road bike you will be stronger for when you go back to mtb.

    I use a road bike 90 % of the time to get fitter for mtb racing.
  • markos1963markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    Welcome to the forum.
    You will find a few differences between your MTB and a road bike. It will feel very light and nervous but the other side of the coin is you will fly up hills compared to the MTB. The reasons for this are mainly less rolling resistance from the tyres, a better more ergonomic and aerodynamic position but mainly the fact you don't want any MTBers coming past you as you climb :wink:
  • vorsprungvorsprung Posts: 1,953
    There are lower gears on a MTB

    So on a very very steep hill on a MTB you select the tiny 22-30 and pedal at a fast cadence which makes you glide forward at a majestic 3mph
    On a road bike you select the 25-34 and out of the saddle you lurch up the hill at an awkward 3mph

    On a less steep hill the road bike will be a little bit faster probably but will hurt more

    On a shallow hill the road bike leaves the MTB for dead

    With a massive 15lb difference the road bike has an advantage on all the hills really

    I usually ride an audax bike. On hilly on-road courses this will out perform the racing bikes ( better gears) and the MTB ( it's lighter) uphill
  • MrChuckMrChuck Posts: 1,663
    You don't have the low gears but then you don't ride up hills the same way you would on your MTB either. If you get a road bike you'll realise what pigs MTBS are on the road and how much of your grunt is being wasted. You'll get up hills OK and your legs won't fall off!
  • Agree with all above comments.

    I went from MTBing to road biking (34/27 lowest on road bike) and found it very different. I struggled with long steep hills to start with but quickly got used to riding on the higher gearing. Riding a road bike is MUCH faster even over hilly routes. My MTB has now been converted into a slick teaded commuter bike. No more mud for me.
  • lastwordslastwords Posts: 304
    I rode mtb but about 4 months ago i got a road bike at first it was hard work but once your legs get stronger it is fine up hill, i really enjoy climbing and pick routes to deliberatly seek out the hills one thing i can say for road biking is it definatly improves your leg strength because you havnt got the tiny granny ring.
  • mouse5mouse5 Posts: 22
    thanks for everyones advice - I'm definately going for a road bike(boardman team carbon), I'll just have to get fitter for the hills but I'm sure that'll come with time and effort. If I struggle too much perhaps I could change to a 12-27 or 12-28 at the back. Looked on the web and in the boardman catalogue and it says its a compact gear set (easier for the hills - quote) but when I asked in Halfords the young lad said it wasn't a compact 'cause there were too many teeth - best to ask here I think, going on peoples opinion of Halford staff.
  • Not sure about the compact thing i think that relates to the crackset side if things someone else will be able to clarify this.

    Hills - unless you are riding in an area with big hills like wales, peak district etc i think you will be pleasantly suprised at how quick you get used to it. Changing the rear cassette is a good option if needed.
  • I'm pretty sure the carbon Boardmans have normal gearing, not compact - I think the cheaper alu bikes have compact gearing.
  • ProssPross Posts: 25,484
    If the Boardman come with a 50 / 34 chainset which I think it does (and you suggest in your original post) then it is a compact and it sounds like you've experienced the sort of Halfords service so many on here complain about! I believe compact actually refers to the bolt diameter of the chainset rather than the number of teeth itself but if it's a 50 / 34 it will be a compact. A standard double on new bikes will generally be 53 / 39 or 52 / 42 possibly (old school) which is why the compact is "easier for cimbing"
  • ProssPross Posts: 25,484
    moolarb wrote:
    I'm pretty sure the carbon Boardmans have normal gearing, not compact - I think the cheaper alu bikes have compact gearing.
    The Team carbon comes with compact on the standard spec, the Pro carbons have a traditional double.
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    Pross wrote:
    I believe compact actually refers to the bolt diameter of the chainset rather than the number of teeth itself but if it's a 50 / 34 it will be a compact. A standard double on new bikes will generally be 53 / 39 or 52 / 42 possibly (old school) which is why the compact is "easier for cimbing"

    The term 'compact' does in fact refer to the different gearing as you observed, not the BCD (although they do often have different bolt locations compared to the double chainset options from the same manufacturer). The downside is the big ratio gap between the two chainrings compared to a double (see plot, double in green, compact in red).

    4068881074_cdc2f649ba.jpg
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
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