Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB general

Sealskinz, how good are they???

jaysonjayson Posts: 4,606
edited October 2009 in MTB general
After a torrential downpour and a soaking this mornin on my ride to work i finally decided to buy some sealskinz waterproof socks and gloves for the coming winter and prob next summer :wink:

Was just wondering what other peoples opinions or experiences were with them, are they really that good or is it another case of marketing hype? the reviews on CRC were favorable for both items so im quietly confident :)

Ive got a breathable jacket and trousers already so i should be completely sorted now, bring it on!!!!!! :P :D
«1

Posts

  • bomberesquebomberesque Posts: 1,701
    I use them and like them.

    - wear merino liners inside. that way you don't need to wash them as much (wash the liner) and they last longer
    - tuck the top of the sock in. Water that gets in through the top will stay in
    - a solution good in all wet weaathers I have found is neoprene overshoes on top of your normal cycling shoes with sealskins and merin liners. The overshoes stop the socks filling and insulate the shoes. However they're a pita to get on and off.

    After a similar thread here a month or so back, I bought a pair of 2mm neoprene socks that I plan trialling in the wetter weather this year. Otherwise I will use sealskins
    Everything in moderation ... except beer
    Beer in moderation ... is a waste of beer

    If riding an XC race bike is like touching the trail,
    then riding a rigid singlespeed is like licking it
    ... or being punched by it, depending on the day
  • Pretty much the same as above, but I haven't tried the liner idea. Think I'll give that one a go.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • jaysonjayson Posts: 4,606
    Cheers guys appreciate the input, im pretty sure they're a good investment but u cant beat real world testimony can u from people that actually have and use the things.

    Now that ive actually gone and got a set though it'll prob be a warm and dry winter and i'll never need to use them DOH!!! :D
  • bomberesquebomberesque Posts: 1,701
    some people seem to machine wash sealskins without issue. I find after about 10-15 washes the goretex bit goes crinkly and they stop working. Perhaps it is my machine or the soap I use. Perhaps my feet are just especially noxious
    Everything in moderation ... except beer
    Beer in moderation ... is a waste of beer

    If riding an XC race bike is like touching the trail,
    then riding a rigid singlespeed is like licking it
    ... or being punched by it, depending on the day
  • _Ferret__Ferret_ Posts: 660
    got the socks and find them to be great for winter riding. I would also advise some extra socks underneath for extra warmth and I also use the neoprene overshoes.
    The only drawback can be clammy feet if you tend to sweat a lot in that region.
    Still the combination explained above is the best IMO.
    Not really active
  • The socks are great, but the gloves are rubbish.
  • zero303zero303 Posts: 1,162
    30 degree machine wash will be fine, any hotter and the gortex or whatever it is shrinks and crinkles. Don't dry on the radiator, basically, keep away from heat!

    They're alright, I've walked through streams and they deffo work. However they are kind of flawed in that they will inevitably fill up with water eventually, unless you have waterproof trousers. Rain will run down your leg and fill them even if you put leg warmers or tights on the outside of them although this does slow the process somewhat.
  • CraggersCraggers Posts: 185
    I've got a pair of the winter mid socks and they are great.....so long as you cover the top blue bit up (waterproof membrene endsjust below the blue bit). Cutting the wrist of a washing up glove and putting it round your ankle over the blue bit helps to give a watertight seal.
    I've also got a pair of the winter/thermal gloves and they are even better than the socks......well worth the money
  • bomberesquebomberesque Posts: 1,701
    zero303 wrote:
    30 degree machine wash will be fine, any hotter and the gortex or whatever it is shrinks and crinkles. Don't dry on the radiator, basically, keep away from heat!

    They're alright, I've walked through streams and they deffo work. However they are kind of flawed in that they will inevitably fill up with water eventually, unless you have waterproof trousers. Rain will run down your leg and fill them even if you put leg warmers or tights on the outside of them although this does slow the process somewhat.

    :lol: at the 30 degrees (as I wash everything at 40) figures!

    as for stopping water getting in the top, the only way I've found (aside from w/proof trousers on top which, let's face it, isn't the preferred solution) is neoprene overshoes. they overshoot the top of the sock and seal against your leg / tights enough to stop water actually "flowing" in. It's worked for me at least ... it's just that I *hate* neoprene overshoes with a passion;

    censored to get on
    horrible to get off when mucky
    worse to get back on again when you find you left them in a steaming heap on the floor after the last ride
    make you look like a smurf ... or worse ; a CXer

    alternatives to this conundrum would be gratefully received.
    Everything in moderation ... except beer
    Beer in moderation ... is a waste of beer

    If riding an XC race bike is like touching the trail,
    then riding a rigid singlespeed is like licking it
    ... or being punched by it, depending on the day
  • jaysonjayson Posts: 4,606
    I have to be honest, i'd never considered washing tham and how it may affect their performance.

    I have a gortex base layer shirt from berghause that ive washed hundreds of times and it still does what its sposed to do but it wasnt designed to be waterpproof like the socks so how would i reliably wash them without ruining them?

    £20 is alot of money for a pair of socks that will be ruined and no better than regular 99p socks after a couple washes.
  • wordnumbwordnumb Posts: 847
    Absolutely agree with the wash at 30 or lower comment. I usually cold wash 'em.

    I find the socks are great cycling but can become uncomfortable hiking. The gloves are awesome, not the warmest but I prefer having the liners for really cold days and a basic glove that can be worn three seasons.
  • llamafarmerllamafarmer Posts: 1,893
    I *hate* neoprene overshoes with a passion;

    ***** to get on
    horrible to get off when mucky
    worse to get back on again when you find you left them in a steaming heap on the floor after the last ride
    make you look like a smurf ... or worse ; a CXer

    They're not the nicest thing to wear, but they certainly work and they're far easier to clean and dry than a pair of shoes.
  • CraggersCraggers Posts: 185
    I've washed my socks about a dozen times (on cool) and they still work as good as new, just dont tumble em or dry em on a radiator or the glue bonding the membrane to the sock will melt, thats when you get the crinklyness
  • zero303zero303 Posts: 1,162
    I too hate neoprene over shoes but the pros far outweight the misery of not wearing them in certain conditions :)
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Got some new ones at the weekend - my old ones weren't working as well as they used to. But once again, any downpour and the water floods the tops and they fill up. I wear 3/4 length shorts in Winter so overtrousers are a no non. I emailed them to ask if they do anything that stops the water but they don't.

    I'm going to try snipping a couple of inches off the legs (ankle section) of an old wetsuit and see if that seals them.

    I pointed out in my email that they say "100% waterproof" but they aren't - hope my Heath Robinson plan works because if my feet get wet every time it rains, what's the point in them?!
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    Well, they are waterproof, so is a bucket but if you pour water in the top... :lol: It's weird though, I've never had that problem except when I was wearing my merino liners, they seemed to act like a wick and pulled water in. But other than if I do something really idiotic like sticking my feet in a deep stream over the top, they always do the job. I do wear the middle high ones, which probably helps.

    The other thing is, even if you do get wet feet they still keep you warmer than a normal sock- one time I fell in a reservoir a bit and no amount of socks and overshoes is going to help then, but even with water slopping around in my shoes and ice on the reservoir surface my feet stayed warm enough to carry on.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    They do act a bit like a wetsuit in that respect but a simple neoprene (single lined/smoothskin) "collar" would keep most of the rain out.

    Yes it was raining quite hard yesterday but they were full of water after only about five minutes of riding - you then have the "balloon foot" effect.

    If I can surf in decent sized waves in my Winter wetsuit and come out dry, then a sock should be able to keep a bit of rain out.

    I generally like them but reckon they need to come up with a way of sealing them better - using wetsuit or drysuit technology.
  • I've just bought a pair of army surplus waterproof socks for £7 a pair of Ebay, if they are meant for the troops, they are good enough for me...sod paying £25 for a pair of socks :lol:
    Caz xxx
  • I once borrowed a pair of wetsuit socks for a caving trip. They worked fine. Would they work on the bike? Anyone tried?
    Frank Yates
  • I find after about 10-15 washes the goretex bit goes crinkly and they stop working.

    I bought a 3-pack of socks from CRC last year - after one wash I got the "crinkly" effect with one pair but the others have remained perfest despite lots of use/washes! Maybe they are very sensitive to wash temperature?
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I once borrowed a pair of wetsuit socks for a caving trip. They worked fine. Would they work on the bike? Anyone tried?

    Far too sweaty - neoprene doesn't breathe.
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Well I snipped 2 inches off the bottom of the legs of an old wetsuit (Xcel Infiniti 3mm - thin and flexible) and used them as "cuffs" to seal the tops - works an absolute treat!

    Also fully waterproofed both pairs (short and 3/4 length) of Singletrack shorts using Nikwax Tech Wash and then Tx Direct - now 100% waterproof.

    That and the new Altura Reflex jacket (utterly brilliant) and I am now Mr Waterproof!
  • dave_hilldave_hill Posts: 3,877
    jayson wrote:
    Was just wondering what other peoples opinions or experiences were with them, are they really that good or is it another case of marketing hype? the reviews on CRC were favorable for both items so im quietly confident :)

    Probably the single best investment I've ever made for cycling. Marks out of 10? 11, no question.
    Give a home to a retired Greyhound. Tia Greyhound Rescue
    Help for Heroes
    JayPic
  • jaysonjayson Posts: 4,606
    dave_hill wrote:
    jayson wrote:
    Was just wondering what other peoples opinions or experiences were with them, are they really that good or is it another case of marketing hype? the reviews on CRC were favorable for both items so im quietly confident :)

    Probably the single best investment I've ever made for cycling. Marks out of 10? 11, no question.

    This is what i was thinkin but even more so now ive read of peoples experiences here, thanks guys appreciate all the opinions :D
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    They do act a bit like a wetsuit in that respect but a simple neoprene (single lined/smoothskin) "collar" would keep most of the rain out.

    Yes it was raining quite hard yesterday but they were full of water after only about five minutes of riding - you then have the "balloon foot" effect.

    See, that's what confuses me, I've just never had that at all, doesn't happen with mine. Maybe it's a fit thing, or some are better than others or something?
    Uncompromising extremist
  • izthewizizthewiz Posts: 154
    Like the Marigold idea on page 1.
    My solution to the 'water running down leg making socks wet even inside 100% waterproof overshoes/socks' problem is using scuba diving drysuit ankle cuffs (like these: http://www.sailboats.co.uk/Product~Latex_Drysuit_Ankle_Seal_Only_Pair_54026.html )over the top edge of the overshoe/sock. Pull the cuff on first to about mid-calf, put on socks/footwear/overshoes, pull bigger bit of cuff over top of overshoe/waterproof sock.

    With Sealskinz socks and this cuff arrangement, the overlap is enough that I have kept dry feet whilst wading a knee-deep stream! (the lower edge of my shorts didn't take long to dry, either)

    I don't have hairy ankles though, so that might make a difference.

    BTW, same subject here:http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=12545427&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0 but for roadies.
    The only bad view from the saddle is of the point of impact rising rapidly to meet you.
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    iz - link saying product not available but sounds good!

    My botch job will do for now though.

    Northwind - any time it rains heavily, it happens. But water from the ground stays out.
  • izthewizizthewiz Posts: 154
    The only bad view from the saddle is of the point of impact rising rapidly to meet you.
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Iz -nice one! The slight issue with that stuff is leg hair rippage. Mine are double lined material (no shiny rubber) so don't yank legs fur out. But they don't look as "professional" as those. A good find and bookmarked for future possible purchasing!
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    Northwind - any time it rains heavily, it happens. But water from the ground stays out.

    Mmm, but that's it exactly- we know about heavy rain up here :lol: But I've still never had that. But other people do, it's weird.
    Uncompromising extremist
Sign In or Register to comment.